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Volume X AUGUST, 1917 Number 4 

MJG 2 2 1917 

letufeton 

^tate iSonnal ^cfjool 

PuHetm 



General Catalog 



Published Quarterly by the Lewiston State Normal School at 
Lewiston. Idaho. 



Entered as second-class matter, August 5, 1905, at the Postoffice at 
Lewiston, Idaho, under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. 



Revised School Calendar 1917-1918 



First Semester. 

Registration Monday, September 17, 1917 

Training School Opens Tuesday, September 18, 1917 

Class Work Begins Tuesday, September 18, 1917 

First Quarter closes Friday, November 16, 1917 

Second Quarter begins Monday, November 19, 1917 

Thanksgiving Holidays. . . .Thursday and Friday, Nov, 29 and 30, 1917 

Christmas Holidays begin Friday, December 21, 1917 

Exercises resumed Wednesday, January 2, 1918 

First Semester closes Friday, January 25, 1918 

Second Semester. 

Second Semester or Third Quarter begins .. Monday, January 28, 1918 

Third Quarter closes Friday, March 29, 1918 

Fourth Quarter closes Monday, April 1, 1918 

Spring Vacation. .. .Thursday and Friday of the week during the 
meeting of the Inland Empire Teachers Ass'n. 
Exercises resumed the following Monday. 

Annual Field Day Saturday, May 18, 1918 

Training School closes Friday, May 24, 1918 

Commencement Exercises. .Sunday, May 26 to Friday, May 31, 1918 
Fourth Quarter closes Friday, May 31, 1918 

Siumner Session, 1918 

Summer Session begins Tuesday, June 4, 1918 

Summer School closes Friday, August 2„ 1918 

"Six-weeks Term" closes Friday, July 19, 1918 

Vacation, Independence Day Thursday, July 4, 1918 

In addition to the Summer Session, one special six-weeks course 
for teachers will be offered beginning September 10, 1917. This course 
is offered to accommodate teachers who wish to fulfill the require- 
ments of the School Law for securing, raising, or renewing county or 
state certificates. 



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in 2013 with funding from 

University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign 



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KiXTIiAXrio TO MAIN I !l JI I.I >IN(; 



Volume X AUGUST, 1917 Number 4 



^tate iSormal ^cftool 
PuUetin 



General Catalog 



Published Quarterly by the Lewiston State Normal School at 
Lewiston, Idaho. 



Sntered as second-class matter, August 5, 1905, at the Postoffice at 
Lewiston, liaho, under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. 



INDEX 

Accommodations for Students and Expenses 17 

Administrativ.6 Staff 5 

Admission Requirements 26-28 

Summary of Admission Requirements 29-30 

Answers to Questions 15 

Application for Advanced Standing 28 

Appointment Committee 32-33 

Assignment and Care of Rooms 18-19 

Attendance, Summary of 60-62 

Buildings and Grounds 12 

Calendars 6-7 

Care of Health 18 

Certificates and Diplomas 30-32 

Cost of Board and Room 20 

Courses of Instruction 

Courses in Outline: General 34, 35, 37;Primary, Rurals and 
Principals 36; Specialists 35, 37-38; Certificate 35, 37; Six 
Weeks 36. 

Description of Courses by Departments 41 

Agriculture 49-50; Education 41-43; English 45-46; Fine 
Arts 53; General Science 59; History and Civics 47-48; Home 
Economics 56-58; Library 60; Mathematics 48-49; Manual 
Training and Applied Arts 50-51; Penmanship 60; Physical 
Education 54-56; Primary 45; Public School Music 51-52; 
Rural 49; Science 58-59; Teachers Courses 43-44. 

Diplomas and Certificates 30-32 

Directory of 1916-17 Students 63-70 

Directory of Summer Students 70-73 

Dormitory for Men 19 

Executive Committee for the L. S. N. S 3 

Expenses Estimated 21 

Extension Work 23-26 

Faculty for 1916-17 8-10 

General Information 11 

Lewis Hall 17-18 

Lewis Hall, Dining-Room. 1^ 

History and Location 11 

Hot Lunches 16 

Index . 2 

Lewistonian, The 12 

Loan Fund, Normal School 23 

Outside Accommodations 20 

Piano and Voice Lessons 16 

Publications of the L. S. N. S 73-74 

Railroad Service 21 

Purpose and Organization H 

Rural Training Centers 4 1 

Schedule of Anspmblies 12 

State Board of Education 3 

State Educational InstitutioriH 4 

Student Aid 22 

Student Organizations 13-14 

Student's Outfit 1^ 

Traininjr School, Graded '^^ 

Visitors ^ ^ 



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

and 
BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO. 



Evan Evans, President Grangeville 

Ramsey M. Walker Wallace 

J. A. Keefer Shoshone 

J. A. Lippincott Idaho City 

William Healy Boise 

Ethel E. Redfield, State Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

Ex-Officio Member Boise 

Enoch A. Bryan, Commissioner of Education Boise 



Executive Committee of the State Board of Education 
for the Lewiston State Normal School. 

Evan Evans, Chairman. 

Enoch A. Bryan, Commissioner of Education. 

Oliver M. EJliott, President of the Lewiston State Normal School. 



state Educational Institutions. 



THE UNIVERSITY OP IDAHO, at Moscow, including Colleges of 
Letters and Sciences, Engineering, (including Mining), Agri- 
culture and Law. 

THE STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS, at Lewiston and Albion, for the 
training of teachers. 

THE IDAHO TECHNICAL INSTITUTE, at Pccatello, a school giving 
vocational, scientific, literary and technical work of a grade 
covered by the first two year® of college courses and such 
secondary school work as the needs of the state demand, 

THE INDUSTRIAL TRAINING SCHOOL, at St. Anthony; a home and 
school for boys and girls who in the judgment of the Juvenile 
Court need special care and discipline. 



Information concerning any of the above institutions may be ob- 
tained from the institution or from the State Board of Education 
at Boise. 



Administrative Staff. 



Oliver M. Elliott, President. 

of Bernice McCoy, Dean of Women. 
ri- 

P. E. Millay, Dean of the Rural Department and Recorder. 

Aurelia O'Connell, Executive Secretary. 

Verona E. Wood, Financial Secretary and Accountant. 

Pearl Leonard, Stenographer and Office Assistant. 



IDS 

Ida 

ich Irene Harrington, Matron of Lewis Hall. 



In the absence of the President, Francis E. Millay, Dean of the 
ind Rural Department, is his official representative. 

lilj The heads of the departments are directly responsible to the presi- 

dent for the details of administration within their respective depart- 
ments. 

Mr. F. E. Millay is in charge of the Extension work offered for 
teachers-in-service who are desirous of self-improvement in a profes- 
sional way but who are unable to take work in residence. Such courses 
are not as yet on a final credit basis. Requests for further informa- 
o"^ tion concerning extension work should be addressed to Mr. F. E. Millay. 
All General Inquiries and requests should be addressed to the 
President or the Executive Secretary. 



1917 CALENDAR 1917 | 


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School Calendar 1917-1918 



First Semester 

Registration Monday, September 10, 1917 

Training School Opens Tuesday, September 11. 1917 

Class Work Begins . Tuesday, September 11, 1917 

First Quarter closes Friday, November 9, 1917 

Second Quarter begins Monday, November 12. 1917 

Thanksgiving Holidays Thursday and Friday, Nov. 29 and 30, 1917 

Christmas Holidays begin Friday, December 21, 1917 

Exercises resumed Monday, January 7, 1918 

First Semester closes Friday, January 2 5, 1918 

Second Semester. 

Second Semester or Third Quarter begins . .Monday, January 28, 1918 

Third Quarter closes Friday, March 29. 1918 

Fourth Quarter closes Monday, April 1, 1918 

Spring Vacation . . . .Thursday and Friday of the week during th.e 
meeting of the Inland Empire Teachers Ass'n. 
Exercises resumed the following Monday. 

Annual Field Day Saturday, May 18, 1918 

Training School closes Friday, May 24, 1918 

Commencement Exercises ..Sunday, May 26 to Friday, May 31, 1918 
Fourth Quarter closes Friday, May 31, 1918 

Sumimer Session, 1918. 

Sum.mer Session begins Tuesday, June 4, 1918 

Summer School closes Friday, August 2, 1918 

"Six-weeks Term" closes Friday, July 19, 1918 

Vacation, Independence Day Thursday, July 4, 1918 

In addition to the Snmmer Session, one special six-weeks course 
for teachers will be offered beginning September 10, 1917. This course 
Is offered to accommodate teachers who wish to fulfill the require- 
ments of the School Law for securing, raising, or renewing county or 
state certificates. 



Faculty for 1917-1918. 



Oliver M. Elliott, President Education 

A. B., Marietta College; A. M., University of Iowa, 

Hazel Aldrich Special Room Teacher in Fifth and Sixth Grades 

A. B., Iowa State Teachers College. 

Nettie M. Bauer Assistant in the Department of Eng^lish 

A. B., University of Idaho. 

Carrie E. M. Burks 

Supervisor of the Primary Department (Grades I-IV). 

Graduate S. N. S., Edmond, Oklahoma; Student, University of 
California and University of Chicago; B. S., Columbia University. 

Charles F. Chessman 

Supervising Principal of the Training School; Acting- Head of 

the Department of Mathematics. 

A. B., Harvard University; Student, Bridgewater S. N. S.; Graduate 

Student, University of California, and Teachers College, Columbia 

University. 

Ida A, CoUings Penmanship 

Graduate of Special Training Class at Dubuque. Graduate Palmer 
School, Cedar Rapids. 

Mary Royce Crawford Librarian 

Diploma Library Training School, Riverside, California. 

Herbert E. Fowler Head of the Department of English. 

Graduate S. N. S., Mansfield, Pennsylvania; A. B., Princeton Uni- 
versity. 

Alvida L. Hansen. . .Rural Center Supervisor at the Sweetwater School 
Graduate. Lewiston State Normal School. 

Edith Hibbard Assistant in Library 

Library Training School, Riverside, California. 

Anna Hong Head of the Department of Fine Arts 

Graduate, Los Angeles State Normal School. Art Diploma, 
Iowa State Teachers College. Student, University of California. 

M. Edith Jones Piano 

Graduate Oberlin Conservatory; B. Music, Oberlin College; Student 
In Conservatory of Music, Leipzig. 

Ru.sh .Jordan Student Assistant in Junior High School 



Edna M. I^ckwood . . . .Rural Center Supervisor at th« Gurney School 
Graduate, Lewiston State Normal School; Student, University of 
Idaho. 

Grace McColIister 

Assistant in the Department of Home Economics, (Domestic 

Science). 

Graduate S. X. S.. Santa Barbara, California: B. S., University of 
California. 

Bernice McCoy Dean of Women, Economic* 

Graduate, Lewiston State Normal School. Graduate Student, 
Teachers College, Columbia University. 

Alice McDonald .... Special Room Teacher in First and Second Grades 

Graduate, Lewiston State Normal School. 

Elizabeth McDonald. .Rural Center Supervisor at East L#ewiston School 
Student, Northwestern Academy, Evanston, Illinois; Student, Agri- 
cultural College, Logan, Utah. 

Pranlc McDonald 

Assistant in the Department of English and Instructor in Ath- 
letics for Men. 

Graduate S. N. S., La Crosse, Wisconsin; A. B., University of Wis- 
consin. 

Pearl McEachran Assistant in the Department of Science 

Graduate, Lewiston State Normal School. 

Mary Wilson McGahey 

Head of the Department of Applied Arts and Manual Training 

A. B., Nebraska University; B. S., Columbia University. 

Agnes Catherine McHugh 

Assistant in the Department of Home Economics (Domestic Art) 
Student Idaho University; Graduate Drexel Institute. 

P. E. Millay Recorder and Dean of the Rural Department 

Graduate S. N. S., Cheney, Washington; A. B., and M. A., University 
of Washington. 

Melissa M. Minger 

Rural Center Supervisor at the Upper Tammany School 
Graduate, Lewiston State Normal School. 

Bernita Ninneman . .Special Room Teacher in Third and Fourth Grades 
Graduate, S. N. S., Mankato, Minnesota; Graduate Student, Lewis- 
ton State Normal School. 

O. M. Osborne Agriculture 

Graduate S. N. S., Oshko.sh, Wisconsin; B. S. A. University of Wis- 
consin. 

Joseph Reed 

Supervisor of Elementary Geography and General Science 
M. A., University of Denver. 

9 



Louise Shaff Assistant in the Department of History- and Civics 

Student, Lewiston State Normal School; A. B,, University of 
Washington; Graduate Student, University of Washington, and 
University of California. 

Henry L. Talkington. . Head of the Department of History and Civics 
A. B., and A. M., Drury College, Springfield, Missouri. 

Edith Thompson. .Assistant in the Department of Physical Education 
Graduate, Lewiston State Normal School. 

Myrtle Treadwell . . Head of the Department of Public School Music 
Northern Illinois Normal School; Columbia School of Music. 

Marguerite Griffith Tyler S 'ience 

A. B., and Teacher's Diploma, University of Michigan; S. M., Uni- 
versity of Michigan; S. M., University of Chicago. 

Addie M. White. .Special Room Teacher in Seventh and Eighth Grades 
Graduate, S. N. S., Dekalb, Illinois; A. B., University of Wisconsin. 

Glentworth M. Willson Education 

Ph. B. Alfred University. Graduate Student, Columbia University. 

B. Evangeline Wiseman Rural Center Super\'isor 

Graduate, Lewiston State Normal School. 



. .Head of the Department of Home Economics. 
Head of the Department of Physical Education. 

Training Center Supervisor. 

Director of Rural Education. 



'To be appointed. 



LEWISTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



General Information. 



-History. 

The Lewiston State Normal School was established in January, 
IS 93, its purpose and organization being set forth in the following 
extracts from the act passed by the Legislature of the State of Idaho 
and approved January 27, 1893. 

'An Act to Establish a State Normal School at lewiston, in the 
County of Nez Perce, Idaho, and to Create a Board of Trustees for the 
Management Thereof. 

•'Be It Enacted by the Legislature of the State of Idaho: 

"Section 1. That a Normal School for th.e State of Idaho is hereby 
established in the City of Lewiston. in the County of Nez Perce, to 
be called the Lewiston State Normal School, the purpose of which 
shall be for training and educating teachers in the art of instruction 
and governing in the public schools of the State and of teaching the 
various branches that pertain to a good common school education. * " 
Piiriiose and Organization, 

The Lev\'iston State Normal School desires to be known only as a 
technical school for the training of teachers. It claims as its field, 
however, the training of any and all types of teachers needed for ser- 
vice in rural and graded ischools. The courses which it offers are all 
offered to meet some direct demand for the training of some particu- 
lar type of the teacher needed. 

The definition of the purpose of the institution is stated in such 
general language in the Establishing Act that it serves stil? to define 
quite accurately the purpose of this Normal School. 
Location. 

Lewiston, a natural home city and a most fitting location for a 
state institution, is situated at the confluence of two of the greatest 
rivers of the Northwest — the Snake and the Clearwater. It is 
well served by railroads and will be a terminal for the proposed 
North-South Highway and also for the Montana-Idaho Highway which 
is under construction. Added to the.^e advantages those who tem- 
porarily make their home in the city enjoy the benefits of a well 
organized community life and are surrounded by the best facilities for 
promoting their religious and social as well as their physical wel- 
fare, --^n intelligent interest on the part of the citizens of Lewiston 
is taken in all types of educational effort and a fine spirit of coopera- 

11 



tion and consideration is manifested in caring for the young people 
whio attend the state normal school. 
Building and Grounds. 

The Normal School grounds consist of approximately twenty 
acres donated for this purpose by the city of Lewiston. These grounds 
are located on what is known as Normal Hill, in a pleasant residence 
portion of the city. 

During the past year cement walks connecting Lewis Hall with 
the street and connecting all the buildings on the campus have been 
laid. The improvements made from year to year have added greatly 
to the attractiveness of the Normal School Campus. The buildings, 
five in number, are all of red brick and produce a harmonious appear- 
ance. 

The proposed building plans for this year make possible the re- 
modeling and betterment of the Main Building and the construction 
of th€> first unit of the West W^ing. This improvement will afford new 
and adequate quarters for the administrative offices and for the ref- 
erence library and will by the in.stallation of a modern ventilating sys- 
tem and other necessary changes result in a building that contributes 
its part to the good health and efficient administration of the schooL 
Wtork will begin on th« improvements about August first. 
Visitors. 

This School is a State institution and desires especially that the 
citizens of Idaho become familiar with its purposes, its facilities for its 
special work, and the character of the results being obtained. To thia 
end all citizens of the State are urged to visit this institution whenever 
they are in this part of the State. Citizens of Lewiston and vicinity 
are urged to become more directly acquainted with the institution by 
making frequent visits to classrooms, laboratories, and the library,, 
and by continuing their generous patronage of the special lecturers 
and entertainments given under the auspices of the school. 

Addresses on educational topics, illus/trated lectures and demon- 
strations in art, music, home economics and agriculture, and special 
programs are presented in General Assemblies. The General Assembly 
is scheduled for Wednesday forenoon from 10:30 to 11:00 o'clock and 
the school cordially welcomes all who are interested in attending these 
exercises. Many will find the Monday and Friday assemblies of special 
inlorost. 
Schcdiik^ of Assemblies for the Year 1917-1918. 

All Assemblies are hold in the Normal School Auditorium from 
10::UJ to 11:00 o'clock. 

.Mondays — in charge of the "Asnociated Students." 

Wednesdays — in charge of the President. 

Fridays — In charge of a member of the faculty. 

Tuesdays and Thursdays — Chorus practice in Charge of the super- 
visor of 7)nbllc school music. 

Tho Ix'wlHtonlnn. a qunrtrrly school paper, is published by the 

12 



students of the Normal School under the direction and supervision of 
the department of English and aims to be a publication truly repre- 
sentative of the institution. The first number of the Lewistonian is 
distributed about the middle of November and subsequent numbers 
appear in January, March and May. The Senior Class takes charge 
of issuing the May number and publishes it as the School Annual, the 
••ELESENES." 

The Lewistonian has been a welcome visitor to the homes of stu- 
dents, members of the faculty, alumni and former students during 
the past year and all are pleased to know that it will be continued. 
Student Organizations. 

It is the general policy of the School to foster all such organiza- 
tions of the Student Body as can be made to serve as media for the 
special interests and activities of the various groups of students. 
Wihile all such organizations are under the advisory control and di- 
rection of the school it is desired at all times that they s,hall be con- 
ducted almost wholly by the students themselves. Since the oppor- 
tunities for training in initiative and leadership are more or less lim- 
ited it becomes especially desirable that the students shall take ad- 
vantage of every opportunity afforded by their own organizations. 

At the present time the following organizations represent the 
types of student organizations officially sanctioned by the school. 

1. The Associated Students of Lewiston State Normal School. 

2. A Dramatic Club. 

3. A Glee Club. 

4. A Science Club. 

5. A Debating Club. 

6. Athletic Organizations. 

The Associated Students of the Lewiston State Normal School. 

During the spring quarter, 1917, the student body organized as 
"The Associated Students of Lewiston State Normal School." The con- 
stitution of the organization states that the object is "to promote con- 
centrated efforts in student activities that concern the student body as 
a whole." The officers of the association are president, vice-presi- 
dent, secretary, treasurer and athletic, literary, social, music and 
science commissioners. These officers, with the assistance of the 
various student committees, have general control over all student 
activities. Members of the faculty act in an advisory capacity. Dur- 
ing the year one assembly period a week will be in charge of the As- 
sociated Students at which time they will give programs or discuss 
matters of business. 

The Dramatic Club is a student organization composed of those 
who are interested in promoting the literary activities of the school. 
Any normal school student is eligible for membership and participa^ 
tion in the programs of the club. The programs are arranged by stu- 
dent committees under the direct supervision of the English faculty 
and are presented every three weeks. The meetings are both instruc- 

13 



tional and social in character. Music, plays, farces, papers, recitations 
debates, and dialogues^ — all are given a place at some time during the 
year. The Club plans and direct® the presentation of one finished play 
annually. During the past school term the Dramatic Club has planned 
and executed some very creditable work and the detailed plans for the 
year are promising. 

The Glee Club has a membership of approximately thirty-five 
student^;. It meets one evening a week for practice. The Club, a 
voluntary organization, has been generous in contributing musical 
numbers in assemblies and for many special entertainments given by 
the school. Mrs. Treadwell, and the members of the Club have en- 
joyed many pleasant social evenings together during the year. 

The Science Club was organized for the purpose of fostering espec- 
ial interest in recent developments in the field of applied science. All 
students who show especial proficiency in Science are eligible to mem- 
bership in the Club. 

The Debating Club. In connection with the elective course in De- 
bating offered by the English Department, students especially interested 
in practical argumentation and public speaking have organized a De- 
bating Club. Occasionally this organization joints with the Dramatic 
Club in literary programs. 

Athletic Organizations. The athletic activities which have attracted 
a large number of students have centered around basket ball, track 
meets, and tennis for men, and basket ball, field hockey, and tennis 
for the women students. 

During the past year many enthusiastic games of basket ball have 
been played both at home and in neighboring towns. Sixteen out 
of twenty games were won by the men's team. This is a record which 
would do credit to an institution having a much larger enrollment of 
men students. 

Other forms of recreation which are becoming increasingly pop- 
ular with the students are "Hiking" and horseback riding. Large num- 
l>ers of students avail themselvesi of the opportunities afforded by in- 
vigorating hiking trips which often are combined with outdoor picnic 
features. These activities are possible at almost all times of the school 
year on account of the unusually mild winter climate of I>ewiston and 
vicinity. 
^\^lat to Do W hen You Heaoh Lfcwiston. 

Ff)r the information and guidance of students who are coming to 
Lcwiston for the first time and in particular for those who have not 
made the necessary living arrangements in advance, the following de- 
tailofl statement is given. 

Plan to arrive in Lewiston in the day time so that living arrange- 
mentH may be made before night. If late arrival is unavoidable, how- 
ever, HtudentR should telephone to the dean of women (telephone 1126) 
to hf flirectcd to accommodations for the night. 

14 



students arriving on day trains should take a taxi-cab and (tele- 
phone 550 or 114 if there are no cabs at the station. The charge for cab 
is 25 cents.) go at once to the office of the dean of women in the Ad- 
ministration Building on the Normal School campus. Any hand bag- 
gage may be checked at the parcel check room connected with the 
news stand at the west end of the station. 

At the ofiice of the dean of wdmen students will be assisted in 
finding satisfactory homes. 

Where they may have room and board. 
Where they may do light housekeeping. 

Where they may give household assistance in exchange for 
room and board. 
Accommodations in Lewis Hall may also be arranged for with the 
dean of women. 

Accommodations in the Dormitory for Men should be arranged 
for with Mr. Jordan if living arrangements have not been made in 
advance with the Advisor for Men. 

Answers to Questions. 

The regular session opens Monday, September 10, 1917, and covers 
a period of thirty-eight weeks, from September to June. The first 
semester consists of the first and second quarters, and the second sem- 
•ister, consists of the third and fourth, quarters. The division of sub- 
ject matter into courses is, in general, based upon the amount of work 
which can be done in one quarter. 

Students may enter at the opening of any quarter of the year and 
commence, or continue, any of the general courses to advantage. How- 
ever, students are encouraged to enter either at the opening of school, 
September 10, 1917, or at the opening of the Second Semester. January 
28, 1918. 

Students are requested to make their plans so as to arrive in 
Lewiston on day trains. See Railroad Service page 21. 

Women students secure living accommodations thru the office of 
the Dean of Women. Men students will receive assistance from the 
Advisor for Men. 

Any student who has completed three years of high school work or 
its equivalent, may register for permanent credit in this School. 

If you are in doubt concerning being able to meet the entrance 
requirements for normal school work, send a transcript of your pre- 
vious training to the Recorder stating definitely your plans. Please 
use the perforated sheet next to the back cover of this bulletin for this 
purposie, or apply to the School for a similar blank. 

Work completed in standardized institutions will be accepted for 
credit toward certification or graduation from this school in so far as 
the work submitted is transferable in the course for which the candid- 
ate registers, provided, that not less than one-half the credits re- 
quired for certificates or diplomas shall be earned in residence in th« 
T.ewiston State Normal School. 

15 



students entering the Lewiston State Normal School for the first 
time must present evidence of their previous training- on or before 
the day they register. Those who expect to enter September 10 are 
urged to send their records in before September 1. 

Holders of Normal School certificates who wish renewals are 
asked to submit the names and addresses of references (3) and write 
direct to the office of the President for a statement as to what furthez' 
requirements, if any, must be satisfied. For the most part, high school 
graduates may renew Normal School certificates upon satisfactory 
evidence of success in teaching. 
Hot liuiiches for Students., (December to April). 

Under the supervision of the Home Economics Department, the 
School maintains a lunch-room on the third floor of th,e Home Eco- 
nomics building for the students of the Training School and the Nor- 
mal who find it necessary to bring their lunches. One hot-dish is 
prepared from materials brought in by the students and is served by 
members of the rural class in cookery. Thus, it not only fills a need 
of those who depend upon cold lunches, but makes a practical prob- 
lem for those who are expecting to teach in the rural schools. 
Piano and Voice Lessons. 

Private lessons in Piano are offered by the school at the following 
rates: 

One lesson per week, per quarter $ 9.00 

Two lessons per week, per quarter $17.00 

Piano students who are not regularly enrolled in the school for 
other courses, are required to pay the regular registration fee of 50 
cents per quarter. The quarters are each nine weeks in length. All 
piano and voice students must register for their work promptly at the 
opening of the quarter; otherwise a full quarter of work cannot be ex- 
pected. Lessons are made up in cases of illness. Lessons missed for 
any other reason are made up at the discretion of the instructor. The 
work in this department follows the same schedule as work in all 
other departments of the school. Fees are payable strictly in ad- 
vance. 

Private lessons in Voice are offered by private teachers in the city. 
The rates will vary according to the teacher secured. 

Credit will be allowed for the Piano work under the direction of 
the .school and for Voice work when completed with th.e approval of 
the .sfho(»i. 

Use of practice piano per quarter (1 hour daily) $2.00. 

Schedule for piano work must be arranged with Miss Jonee; 
schedule for voice work must have the approval of Mrs. Treadwell. 



IC 



ACCOMMODATIONS FOR STUDENTS AND 
EXPENSES. 



For the information of all students attending the School the fol- 
lowing summary is made setting forth the various types of accommo- 
dations available. 

1. Lewis Hall, the dormitory for women, accommodates sixty- 
six women for both room and board. The Dining-room is open to all 
students for table board at $4.25 per week. 

2. The Dormitory for men adjoins the campus on the east and 
furnishes comfortable accommodations for 15 students. Residents 
of this dormitory take their meals at the Lewis Hall dining room. 

3. Outside Accommodations. 

1. Rooms in affiliated private homes under the supervision 

of the Dean of Women and the Advisor for Men. 

2. Rooms furnished for light housekeeping. Only a limited 

number are available. 

3. Cottages furnished or unfurnished. Only a limited num- 

ber are available. 
liEWIS HALL. 

Lewis Hall, the dormitory for women, was completed February 1, 
1908. The building is most artistic and most complete in its ap- 
pointments, and provides home a^ccommodations which are almost 
ideal for students. The architecture is after the early English type, 
ajid presents a most home-like appearance. The interior wood finish is 
of quarter-sawed fir, stained, and all the rooms are appropriately dec- 
orated. The building has accommodations for from sixty-four to sixty- 
six students in addition to such accommodations as are set aside for thie 
official household. The commodious living-room, library and dining- 
room, with their artistic finish and large, open fireplaces, form cen- 
ers for social life of the type which contributes especially to general 
culture in the student body. The furniture thruout is of solid oak in 
mission design. 

Among the many rooms, all of which are steam-heated, electric- 
lighted, and provided with hot and cold water, doubtless the most 
attractive are the sixteen suite consisting of a study and an alcove bed- 
room. Each such suite has an open fireplace in addition to the steam 
heat. All rooms are equipped with rugs, study tables, chairs, bureaus, 
and Y. M. C. A. cots with, excellent spring.9, mattresses, and pillows. 
Couch covers, hangings, and swiss curtains for the windows, are also 
provided. Thruout the building every arrangement has been made 
that is essential to the comfort, happiness and good health of the stu- 
dents. A bath-room is provided for ever:^^ eight students. 
Administration. 

The women students who live in Lewis Hall are under the dis- 

17 



ciplinary supervision of the dean of women, who is a member of the 
faculty of the institution. The social life of all the women of 
the School is under the direct supervision of the dean. The dean has 
also the executive control of the administration of Lewis Hall. Altho 
it cannot be said to be a finally adopted rule, yet it is understood that 
all women students under the age of twenty-four shall live in Lewis 
Hall, unless an especially designated home in the city has been chosen 
by the parents. In any case, it is understood that situdents not in resi- 
dence vv^ili secure the approval of the dean so far as residence outside 
the Hall is concerned. This is necessary to assure proper attention to 
the private life of each student and to protect every student who en- 
ters the School. Under these circumstances, parents may rely upon the 
School to accept full responsibility for young women entrusted to its 
tutelage. 
Home Life. 

Care is taken to render the home life not only comfortable and 
pleasant, but also conducive to the cultivation of these graces of char- 
acter which mark refined women. Only such restrictions are thrown 
around students in residence as are considered important for their 
health, for the best conduct of their work, and for their personal im- 
provement. Importance is attached to the cultivation of that consid- 
erate regard for the wishes and feelings of otliersi which leads to cour- 
teous deportment and to proper social adjustment. Thruout the year 
definite instruction is good form is given by the dean. 

A library well supplied with, standard essays, works of fiction, and 
current magazines, contributes in no small degree to the attractiveness 
of the life of Lewis Hall. 

Care of the Health. 

The health of the students is carefully safeguarded, both by the 
Department of Physical Education and by those in charge of the living 
arrangements and the disciplinary supervision of the students. To this 
end regular hours for study, recreation and sleep are required. 

At Lewis Hall most careful attention is given to the preparation 
and serving of meals. The school also endeavors to keep in touch 
with the living conditions of students outside of the Hall and through 
advice and suggestions aid such students in establishing and main- 
taining wholesome standards of living. 

Assignment and Care of Rooms. 

Jn the assignment of rooms, precedence is given to those who have 
been longest in residence, but after May 20th of each year, assign- 
ments will be made in the order of request. 

The occupants of each room are expected to keep it in order. 
All rooms are frequently Inspected by the Matron of Lewis Hall. 

Suites are assigned only to two students. No assignment of rooms 
ivlU bo made imless application for same Is accompanied by a deposit 
of .«5r,.00. This amount will be retained as a guarantee deposit for the 

18 



protection of property used by each student and will be credited on 
the final payment of board, less any deducations for breakage or dam- 
age to property. 

Should a person after having- had a room assigned, for any rea- 
son, wish to have this assignment canceled, the $5.00 deposit will be 
refunded, provided, application for same is received before September 
10th. Application for rooms should be made to the Eexecutive Secre- 
tary. Remittance should be made by Postoffice Orders, Express 
Money Order or by Rank Draft, made payable to the Liewiston State 
Normal School. 

Student's Outfit. 

Each student in residence in one of the school dormitories is ex- 
pected to provide the following outfit: 

1. Six table napkins, approximately 22 by 22 inches. 

2. A napkin ring. 

3. Three pairs of sheets, approximately ly^ by 2% yards. 

(Single beds only are used). 

4. Three pillow slips, 2 by 28 inches. 

5. The necessary blankets, comforts, towels, and bureau covers.. 
All articles should be plainly and durably marked with, the 

name of the owner. 

Students using the laundry are required to provide themselves with 
clothes pins, iron holders, ironing blankets and sheets. A charge of 
50 cents a quarter — i. e. nine weeks — will be made for the use of the 
electric current for ironing. Students who expect to do their own lauii- 
dry should provide electric irons. It is required that electric irons 
be used only in the laundry. 

IxjAvis Hall Dining-Koom. 

For the accommodation of students who cannot be assigned to 
rooms in Lewis Hall, but who are none the less under the direct super- 
vision of the school, table board is afforded in Lewis Hall at the regu- 
lar charge of $4,25 per week. Because of the low charge for taible 
board it is impossible to make anj"^ deduction or remittance for ab- 
sence from meals. The service is under the supervision of the Head 
of the Home Economics Department, and it is the best to be obtained 
at the price charged. Those living in private homes enjoy all the 
advantages, so far as table board is concerned, that are open to resi- 
dents of Lewis Hall. 

DORMITORY FOR MEN. 

The Men's Dormitory, a residence adjoining the campus, will ac- 
commodate about fifteen men. The rooms are comfortably furnished 
and porches have been screened so that those who desire, may sleei> 
out of doors. The dormitory is under the immediate supervision of a 
faculty assistant, and the general direction of the Advisor for Men. 
Applications for quarters in the dormitory should be accompanied by 

19 



a reservation deposit of $5. See pages 18 and 19. Names will be listed 
and assignments made according to the date of receipt. Those who fail 
to secure accommodations, will be aided in finding lodgings in private 
homes near the campus. 

The cost of living in the Men's Dormitory is the same as for resi- 
dents of Lewis Hall, $49.50 per quarter of nine weeks. Residents of 
this donnitor>' take their meals at Lewis Hall. 

The rooms in this dormitory are equipped similarly to those in 
Lewis Hail. The necessary outfit comprising table napkins, towels, 
sheets, pillow slips, and bedding is listed in detail under "Lewis Hall" 
on page 19. 

3. OUTSIDE ACCOMMODATIONS. 

Koonis in Affiliated Private Homes. Rooms in private homes in 
the best residence section of the city surrounding the Normal School 
are obtainable for students and will be reserved by the School on the 
same basis as reservations are nnade in Lewis Hall. The prices rang© 
from $8.00 to $12.00 a month for rooms large enough to accommodate 
two people and from $.6.00 to $10.00 for single rooms. In those cases 
the necessary bedding is supplied by the one from whom the room 
is rented. These rooms are under the direct supervision of the Dean 
of Wlomen and th<e Advisor for Men. 

Rooms Furnished for la^ht Housekeeping. Although not espec- 
ially recommended by the School, yet opportunities are available for 
those who prefer to undertake light housekeeping. The School does not 
recommend this method of living as being particularly economical es- 
pecially when interference with study and insufficient opportunity 
for recreation are considered. The regular demands of the school 
work are so heavy each day that, unless students are especially capa- 
ble in managing and above the average in their knowledge of Home 
Economics, it is difficult to live satisfactorily by engaging in light 
housekeeping. However, for all who desire to do so the school will , 
exert «very effort to be of assistance both in securing such accommo- 
dations and also in furnishing advice from time to time thruout the 
year. The head of the department of Home Economics will render 
direct guadance in the matter of the daily food supply of all who un- 
dertake light housekeeping. 

CottagCKS l\irnishcd or Unfurnished. Any who desire furnished 
or unfurnished cottages should communicate direct with, the Presi- 
dent's Office for further information. 

COST OF KOAUD AND llOO^f. 

l\)r the jmrjjosc of making an estimate of the cost of living, the 
cost per quarter in the school dormitories, for room and board, in- 
cluding light, heat and general use of laundry and telephone, may be 
taken a8 $49.50. The financial policy is to charge sufficient to guar- 



mtee that the Hall be self-sustaining, and at the same time assure the 
student good living at cost. 

Cost of Laundry: In so far as it is possible to do so the laundry 
will be made available for the use of the students living in private 
homes as well as those living in Lewis Hall. 

All bills arc due and payable at the office of tlie Financial Secre«- 
tary the first of each quarter in advance: September 10 and November 
12, 1917; January 2S and April 1, 1918. In eases where bills remain 
unpaid for five days after the beginning of a quarter, parents will 
be notified directly concerning the same. 

A limited number of guests of students in residence will be enter- 
tained at a nominal rate. 

Consultation with the Matron of Lewis Hall must be had before 
the invitation is given. 

EXPENSE ESTIMATED FOR A YEAH. 

As the expense of attending the Normal School will vary greatly 
with the individual tastes of students, it is possible to give only a con- 
servative estimate, as follows: 

Four quarters room and board at $49.50 $198.00 

Books and stationery (estimated) 18.00 

Library fee, two semesters, at $1.00 2.00 

Student Activity fee 3.00 

Gymnasium suit, (estimated) 5.00 



Estimated necessary expenses $226.00 

No special laboratory fees are charged in any of the special de- 
partments but the School reserves the right to charge a special fee in 
case any student undertakes a problem involving the use of costly ma- 
terial not in general use for class work. 

No tuition fee is charged for students registered in the regular 
session. 

All other fees for the year are due and payable upon registration. 

Upon personal application fees will be returned to students who 
withdraw within ten days after the date of registering. 

Students who leave school during or at the close of the first sem- 
ester will be entitled to a refund of the second semester fees, provided 
application for same is made in person not later than ten days after the 
opening of the second semester. 

RAILROAD SERVICE. 

Lewiston is served by the N. P. Railway and its branches, the 
Camas Prairie Railway and the Clearwater Railway, connecting with 
northern and central Idaho points, and by the O.-W. R. & N. Co. con- 
necting with all points in southern Idaho. For a number of years the 
School has made a practice of arranging for a special sleeping-mar for 

21 



students from south Idaho points so that students coming from that 
section of the state may experience no inconvenience at junction 
points enroute to Lewiston. 

If sufficient number of students from south Idaho inform the 
President that they will avail themselves of the convenience of this 
special sleeping-car service, arrangements will be made to secure the 
car. Students interested should communicate with the Office of the 
President not later than September first. If secured, this car will be 
attached to the regular west-bound Portland train, No. 19, passing 
thru south Idaho points on the afternoon and evening of Saturday, 
September 8, and arriving in Lewiston at 4:20 on the afternoon of 
Sunday, September 9. Students coming from points on branch lines 
in south Idaho should plan to leave home in time to connect at the 
nearest junction point with the above thru train. 

Students from the extreme north location of Idaho will reach Lew- 
iston most directly by way of Spokane. The Palouse branch of the 
N. P. runs two trains daily to Lewiston. For the accommodation of 
students the best train is the one leaving Spokane at 8:15 a. m. and 
arriving in Lewiston at 3:05 p. m. 
Student Aid. 

The school desires to aid students in finding opportunities for 
self-help. 

For young women, the most productive means of self-support is 
assisting in the care of private homes. The usual compensation for 
such service is room and board. Other sources of income are, (1) 
caring for children at night, (2) serving in private homes for social 
occasions, (3) assisting with plain sewing. 

Young men are occasionally given opportunity to assist the jan- 
itor in caring for the grounds and buildings. Occasional inquiries 
come for young men who can care for lawns and gardens, or do other 
work around private houses. 

Altho employment for young men is not always regular and can 
seldom be secured in advance, the School will actively cooperate with 
students in finding remunerative work. Ordinarily it is inadvisable 
for a student to enter with less than enough money to pay necessary ex- 
penses for one quarter or nine weeks. During that interval it is possi- 
ble to get in touch with sources of employment. 

Fi-uit- picking and packing give opportunity for work outside of 
school hour.s, during the fruit season. Help is most needed during- 
the cherry season which comes usually at the time of the Summer 
Session, Employment of students in the canning of fruit and vegeta- 
bles is now receiving the attention of a special committee on Student 
Employment. 

Under the direction of this committee and in connection with the 
work in Agrirulturo, a poultry house has been built and a yard laid 
out. The poultry is cared for by responsible students who are paid for 

22 



their services. A similar project based upon the maintenance of a 
vegetable garden for the school is under consideration by the commit- 
tee. 

NORMAIj SCHOOlJ IJOAN FUND. 

In addition to the student "Self-Help," a small amount of money 
is available which may be loaned to deserving students. Only those 
students who have been in attendance in the School long enough to 
have established a creditable record will be considered eligible to make 
application for a loan from this Fund. Inquiries concerning this fund 
should be addressed to the President. 

The Loan Fund is in use thruout the year. If this fund were 
double its present amount it would afford needed assistance to a larger 
number of students. 

EXTENSION AVORK. 

The following lines of work are illustrative of the types of ex- 
tension service which have been established. 
Agidculture. 

To the teachers in the rural schools desiring to do some valuable 
work for the community in the teaching of agriculture, the Lewiston 
State Normal School will furnish, free of cost, the use of a Babcock Milk 
Tester for a period of one week. The school receiving the use of the 
tester, however, must pay transportation by parcels post, both ways. 
An amount covering the cost of transportation one way, on a weight of 
fourteen pounds, should accompany the application. 

Since the number of testers on hand is quite limited, those de- 
siring the use of one should file their applications early. 

To avoid delay after the arrival of the tester, the school should 
have ready for use one pound of concentrated commercial sulphuric 
acid. The acid can be had for about ten cents per pound. One pound 
will be sufficient for testing several cows. 

Only teachers having seventh or eighth grade pupils should apply 
for the use of a tester. 

The application should include the following: 

1. The address to which the tester is to be sent. 

2. Sum covering the cost of transportation by parcels post 
one way. (Applicant also to pay return charges.) 

Idaho Rural Teacher's Monitor. 

The Rural Teacher's Monitor is a small paper published by the 
Rural Department. This paper, which is issued monthly during the 
regular session, is devoted especially to the problems of teachers work- 
ing in the rural schools of Idaho. It is expected that teachers who 
are in their first year of service will find it of greatest assistance. 

The "Monitor" is sent to all of our graduates, to all who hold Nor- 
m.al School certificates, and to all the rural teachers of Idaho so far 

23 



as we are able to secure the addresses of s'uch teachers. Anyone wish- 
ing the paper, may secure it upon request. If your address changes 
before the May number is issued, please advise us as to what address 
we may send the last number. 

Packet Libraries. 

Extension libraries for rural schools are being sent by the Normal 
School into rural communities. Each library consists of a set of books 
and bulletins, mainly professional reading for the teacher. It is being- 
sent out by parcels post, to the remote rural districts, upon request 
and the payment of the nominal fee of 25 cents to cover cost of post- 
age and depreciation. The Normal School prepays the postage on the 
library sent out and the person to whom it is sent is expected to prepay 
postage on th« library when he returns it to the Normal School. 

Each library may be kept four (4) weeks from the date on which 
it is received. To secure the use of one of these libraries write to tine 
Director of Rural Education, in care of the State Normal School, Lew- 
iston, Idaho, stating which packet you wish, as packet No. 1, etc. 

The lists of books and bulletins to be sent out under this plan are 
as follows: 
No. 1. 

Cabot — Ethics for Children, 

Gaynor — Songs of the Child World. 

Ledyard — Primary Manual Work. 

Wray — Jean Mitchell's School. 

Bulletins. 

Lists of Books for Public Schools. 

Nature Study and Agriculture for the Rural Schools of Texas. 

School Libraries. 

Occupational Seat Work for Rural Schools. 

Social Activities for the Organization for a Field Day and Play 

Picnic for Country Children. 
Teaching Elementary Arithmetic. 
No. II. 

Burket — Farm Arithmetic. 

Bryant — How to Tell Stories to Children. 

Daniels — School Drawing. 

Field — Corn Lady. 

Bulletins. 
Cornell — Rural School Leaflets. 
Course in Sewing. 
Farmers Chautauquas. 
Field — Farm Arithmetic. 
Language. 

Oufllnf) LosHons in llousekcoping. 
School Libraries. 
OccuiKitlonal Seat Work for llural Schools. 

24 



Social Plays, Games, etc. 
1 Some Things Girls Should Know How to do. 

Brigga and Coffman's — Reading in Public Schools. 
Buell — One Woman's Work for Farm Women. 
Dobbs — Primary Handwork. 

Bulletins. 

Farm and Home Mechanics. 

List of Books for Elementary and Rural Schools. 

Number Steps for Beginners. 

School Libraries. 

Occupational Seat Work for Rural Schools. 

Social Activities for Rural Schools. 
No. IV. 

Barnes — English in the Country Schools. 

Beard — Jolly Book of Box Craft. 

Bryant — Stories to Tell Children. 

Kern — Among Country Schools. 

McAfee — Pine Needle Basket Book. 

Biilletins. 

Moral Education. 

Plays and Games. 

Rural School Lunches. 

School Libraries. 

Seat Work. 

Social Activities for Rural Schools, 

System of Farm Accounting. 

University and Home School League. 

Other books and bulletins will 'be added from time to time. 

This work is considered of especial value for small one-room- 
rural schools in which the teacher and the children have little oppor- 
tunity to come in touch with books of interest and value. The work 
as here undertaken is being done in only a very small way but will be 
enlarged as conditions in the school justify. 

picture Collections. Several sets of one hundred selected copies 
of reproductions of paintings dealing with subjects from art, literature 
and the sciences are available for loan to rural schools. These packets 
may be kept four weeks. They are to be returned at the expense 
of the borrower. 

Victrolas. In order that the children of the more remote rural 
schools may have an opportunity to hear some of the better music and 
to play some of the organized games that need special music, arrange- 
ments have been made to loan to a limJted number of schools a vic- 
trola with an appropriate collection of records. The machines are 
shipped for the expense of transportation and the assumption of repair 
costs in case of breakages. Advice in making up collection of records- 
or in selecting song text books will be sent upon request. 



Ijantem Slides on the following subjects are available and fre- 
quently it can be arranged so that a mem'ber of the faculty can be se- 
cured to g-ive the accompanying lecture. 

1. Industries 

2. Commercial Cities 

3. Sciences. 

4. Peoples and Customs 

5. History and Literature 

6. Fine Art 

Requests for Bulletins and "loan" materials and the direction of 
home-study for professional advancement coming from teachers-in ser- 
vice are attended to promptly thru corresondence, if addressed to the 
Director of Rural Education. Altho it is never the purpose of the 
School to divert any question which should go direct to the office 
of th county superintendent or other educational agencies of the state, 
it is glad to render personal help either thru visitation or corre- 
spondence whenever possible and to this end frequently cooperates with 
the county superintendents in "following up" the teachers who have 
received their training in this institution especially those teachers who 
are teaching their first school. 

Upon request the Normal School endeavors to assist teachers and 
school officials in securing speakers for community meetings or similar 
organizations, in making plans for the arrangement, the building and 
the equipment of new buildings or the making over of old buildings, 
and in handling any specific problem pertaining to the work of the 
normal school. 



Admission Requirements. 

The present policy of the School is to place all courses on a basis 
of high school graduation. 

To fulfill the entrance requirements to the junior year, graduates 
of four-year high schools must have made during their high, school 
course a minimum of thirty credits. These credits should include at 
least six (6) credits of English, three (3) of Science, two (2) of Mathe- 
matics, and three (3) of History. The remaining sixteen (16) credits 
may be elected in any of the branches named above, or in language, 
music, drawing, manual training, domestic science, physical education, 
or commerce. 

By a credit is meant satisfactory work in a course for one semester 
(seventeen to twenty weeks) the class meeting five forty-five minute 
periods per week. If the subject be science or manual work, this time 
should be doubled to allow for laboratory or shop work. 

•^wenty-throo high school credits or approximately three years 
worlr is the minimum preparation required for registering for normal 
school work. 

26 



Rating of Holders of Certlficiites who Become Candidates for Normal 
School Certificates. 

It is the policy of the State Normal Schools of Idaho to place all 
courses on a basis of graduation from an accredited high school. But 
exceptions are made to meet special cases and to do justice to the claims 
of toachers of some experience. These are: 

1 All teachers who hold valid Third Grade County certificates are 
adniitted as candidates for normal school certificates on the basis of 
their preparation to do Normal School work. 

2. All teachers who hold valid Second Grade County certificates 
are admitted to a one-year professional course as candidates for Sec- 
ond grade Normal School certificates. 

3. All Teachers who hold valid First Grade County certificates 
andi who give satisfactory evidence of successful experience in teach- 
ing are admitted as candidates for First Grade Normal School certifi- 
cates. 

4. All teachers who hold valid State certificates and who give 
satirtfactory evidence of successful teaching experience for three years 
are admitted to classification as juniors with such advanced credit on 
their junior year's work as their previous preparation justifies. 

5. All teachers who hold valid State Life certificates and who 
give satisfactory evidence of successful experience in teaching for five 
years are admitted with provisional classification as seniors. 

6. Candidates of mature years are admitted as candidates for cer- 
tificates but the Schools reserve the right to pass upon the time re- 
quired to prepare for such certificates, or diplomas. 

Rating of Holders of Certificates Who Become Candidates for the 

Diploma. 

High School Graduates who hold valid First Grade Certificates 
issued previous to June 1, 1914, shall receive such credit toward grad- 
uation from diploma courses as their previous work in the normal 
school justifies. 

High school graduates who hold valid First Grade certificates is- 
sued after June 1, 1914, shall be given senior classification in general 
diploma courses. 

Holders of Second Grade Certificates issued after June 1, 1917, 
shall be given junior classification in general diploma courses when 
they have satisfied the high school requirements as stated above. 

The following plan is suggested as feasible for high school g^'ad- 
uates desiring to complete a two year Normal School course in one 
regular session and four successive summer sessions. Beginning the 
first v/eek in June and continuing through to the close of the following 
summer session they may complete one and one-half year's work as 
follows: 

One quarter in the 1917 summer session (June- August.) 

Four quarters in the 1917-18 regular session (September- June.) 

One quarter in the 1918 summer session (June-August.) 

27 



Those students may secure a certificate and teach during the fol- 
lowing school years, then return and finish the remaining half year 
of work in the summer sessions of 1919 and 1920. In this way any 
of the regular two-year courses may be completed in one full year and 
four summer terms with only one year without employment. 
Honorable Dismissal. 

A student desiring to enter from another school before completin?^ 
the work offered in that school should present a certificate of honor- 
able dismissal from that school. 
Foraaer Rating Recognized. 

Students from standardized institutions in other states who wish 
to enter this School, will receive the same rating they have in a nor- 
mal school in the state from which they come. The suggestions which 
follow will be found of definite assistance to those who contemplate 
entering thds School. 
Recognition of College Oi'edits. 

College or university graduates or undergraduates will upon for- 
mal application be granted such advanced standing in this School as 
their credentials warrant. For the most part, all who have completed 
ten credits or more of their undergraduate course can complete course 
A-4 in one year by taking ten assigned credits in education. See pages 
42-44. 
Make Up Work. 

Students who have not completed the requirements for admission 
to that course which they desire to enter will, provided they do not 
lack more than three semester credits, or one and one-half units of 
senior high school work, be admitted on condition and assigned to 
such Make-Up Work as may seem best adapted to their needs. 

However, in view of the fact that the Lewiston State Normal School 
has eliminated all senior high school work it is not advisable, except- 
ing under special circumstances, to depend upon completing entrance- 
requirements in this institution. 
Api)lication lUank for A«lvanced Standing. 

T. If you wish a statement of your rating in this School and an 
estimate of the time it will require to complete a given course on the 
basis of the work you have completed elsewhere please submit a rec- 
ord of your work beyond the elementary school on the blank inserted 
next to the back cover of this bulletin. Tt is best to have this blank 
filled out and returned to ua by the principal or registrar of the school 
or srhoola attended. 

FT. When this blank is returned write to us and give us the fol- 
lowing Information: 1. Aro you interested in securing our diploma 
by your attendance now? Tf so, what department do you expect to 
enter? 2. la your Immediate purpose in coming here to secure a 
certificate? If so what grade of certificate do you expect to work for? 

28 



■3. Submit a statement of your teaching experience if you have had 
any. 4. Enclose some evidence of your success in teaching. 5. What 
certificate, now in force, do you hold in Idaho? In any other state? 6. 
Send credentials from the institution in Vvliich your training was re- 
ceived. (These will be returned). 

III. As soon as you decide to enter here write directly to the 
Office of the President and ask for such information and assistance aa 
you may need in making preliminary arrangements for your room and 
board while in Lewiston. See pages 17-22. 
Basis of Estimating Credits In This School. 

One credit equals work completed in a class meeting for 45-60 
minutes, four or five times a week for a semester, (or the equivalent); 
laboratory period is a double period. Ten (10) credits is considered a 
full year's work. 

Meaning of grades: 

8+ Above average. 
S Satisfactory. 
S — Below average. 
C Conditioned. 
I Incomplete. 
U Failure. 

X Dropped by permission. 
Students Wishing a Transcript of the record of the work they com- 
pleted in this School, for the purpose of entering another school or for 
any other reasonable purpose, will find it to their advantage to ac- 
company their request with the address of the school they expect to 
enter and have the record sent directly from this office to the office of 
such school. All schools prefer, and most Institutions require, that this 
method of obtaining information concerning credit be followed. 

No charge is made for copies of students records that aro sent di- 
rectly from this school to other institutions, but only one copy will be 
sent to the student, without charge. For an additional copy sent to 
the student a charge of $1.00 is made. This fee is to cover the cost 
of the clerical work involved and should accompany the request of the 
student. 

Summary of Admission Requirement.s, Course Offered, and 

Certification in the Lewiston State Normal School. 

High School Preparation: Normal School Course: Certificate Granted 

3 years or its equivalent 1 year Second grade Normal School, 

good for 3 years and renew- 
able. 
1 years or its equivalent 1 year First grade Normal School, 

good for 3 years and renew- 
able. 

4 years or its equivalent 2 years Diploma or Life Certifi- 

cate. 

29 



4 years or its equivalent 3 years Diploma in two depart- 

ments (selected). 

4 years or its equivalent 2 1^ 3 years Specialist's diploma in home 

economics and certificate to 
teach general subjects. 



Diplomas and Certificates. 

The Idaho State Normal Schools issue upon graduation, after the 
completion of a two-year course beyond high school graduation, a 
diploma which is a Life Certificate in the State of Idaho. 

In addition to the Life certificate, the normal schools grant,— 

A First Grade Certificate, written for five years and renewable 
once, to high school graduates who have finished a one-year profes- 
sional course for teachers. 

A Second Grade Certificate, written for three years and renewable 
once, to those who have completed at least three years of high school 
work and in addition thereto have finished a one-year professional 
course for teachers. 

Probationary Certificate: In many cases candidates for the 
above certificates are granted Probationary certificates instead of full- 
time certificates. These Probationary certificates are exchangeable 
at the end of the first year of teaching for a full-time certificate with 
the dating of the original certificate, provided, evidence of satisfac- 
tory success in teaching be presented to the School issuing the certi- 
ficate. 

Candidates for Specialists' Diplomas may be completing one-half 
year's work selected from the general course be granted a First 
Grade certificate in addition to their Specialists' diploma. The total 
requirements of all such teachers would be four years high school 
work followed by two and one-half years of general and special train- 
ing. 

Notes : 

1. "High School graduates" as used above means those who 
have completed a four-.year course in an accredited high school 
or the equivalent of this course. 

2. At least one-half of the work required to complete any 
of the above courses shall be completed in the Institution granting 
the certificate or diploma. 

3. Practice teaching under the supervision of the Institu- 
tion lg«uing the certificate or diploma shall be a requirement in 
all the above courses. 

The diploma Issued upon the completion of one of the two-year 
courses 5r a special sUmp of approval placed upon teachers as spec- 

30 



ialists in a particular field; for example, general grade teachers — pri- 
mary, intermediate or upper, junior high school, — rural, home eco- 
nomics, public school music, principals. In the one-year courses the 
normal schools endeavor to give the students such general training 
]eis will qualify them to leach and will at the same time fulfill thic re. 
quirements of the junior year of the two-year course which they look 
forward to completing as scon as possible. This general training is 
specifically directed toward general grade teaching and teaching in, 
rural schools. 

In the case of those wnose previous training is less than high 
school graduation the one-year professional course is essentially the 
same as above. However, holders of Second Grade Normal School 
certificates and holders of First Grade Normal School certificates who 
are not high school graduates snail satisfy high school graduation re- 
quirements before they enter upon their senior year's work in the 
professional school. 

"Make-Up" Work: In view of the fact that the Lewiston State 
Normal School has elimhiated all senior high school work not more 
than three semester credits, or one and one-half units, of senior high 
school work can be secured in the Lewiston State Normal School and 
it is not advisable to depend upon completing entrance requirements in 
this institution. 
Candidates Registered for Normal School Certificates May Complete 

Course. 

Certificate courses may be completed under the provisions obtain- 
ing when the candidates registered for such courses, provided 

(1) Candidates for First, Second, or Third grade certificates as 
granted previous to September, 1916, shall complete their courses 
during the 1916-17 session. 

(2) Candidates for First Grade certificates as granted during the 
first semester of the 1916-17 session shall complete their courses 
during the 1916-17 session. 

No charge is made for the issuance of these certificates but in 
any case, when thru loss or accident, a duplicate certificate is re- 
quested to be issued a fee of $1.00 will be charged. In the case of th« 
issuance of a duplicate of a diploma the fee of $1.00 together with 
the cost of the diploma will be charged. 

Application for a normal school certificate, by students registered 
in the School the first semester, must be filed with the Recorder be- 
fore the opening of the second semester. Those students who enter at 
the opening of the second semester, or later, must file their application 
for a certificate with the Recorder by the end of the first month fol- 
lowing their registration. 

The certificates granted thru this institution parallel those issued 
by examination excepting that the school no longer issues third grade 
certificates. This provision, however, is not retroactive and therefore 

31 



it will not effect the case of those students who have registered for 
certificates prior to September, 1916. See pages 30-32. 

This school follows the policy adopted iby the state: First. In 
matters regulating those who are eligible to hold a certificate as set 
forth in the following statement taken from the laws of Idaho. 

...."After May 1, 1917, no person shall be granted a certificate 
who has not completed four (4) years of high school work or it« 
equivalent; Provided: That this requirement shall not apply to any- 
one who has taught at least eight (8) school months before May 1, 
1914, and Provided further: That the State Board of Education maj 
make such temporary modifications of the requirements of this rec- 
tion as may be necessary to supply the schools with teachers." 

Second. In the number of certificates of the same grade that 
will be issued to any one person. 

Since this School has eliminated high school work there has 
been a very decided increase in the number of certificates and 
diplomas granted. The following table sihows the change during the 
period June, 1908, to August 1, 1916. 

Certificates Diplomas Total 

1908 26 9 46 

1909 32 17 49 

1910 39 25 64 

1911 45 38 88 

1912 112 43 155 

1913 ••• -117 45 162 

1014 174 58 232 

1915 284 66 350 

1916 354 54 408 

1917 (approximately) 240 74 414 



Appointment Committee. 

The major part of the student body goes directly into teach- 
ing each year. This is quite in accordance with the policy of the 
School which is that of preparing teachers as quickly and as directly 
for their work as is consistent with required standards in our State. 
Trained teachers aro in demand, and this School will always welcome 
inquiries for such teachers. It is the purpose of the administration of 
the School to be as helpful as possible to public school officials, and 
with that end in view, it will strive to place its teachers so that they 
may serve the State with credit to themselves and to the educational 
interests Involved, 

For the past ten years we have maintained a special committee 
on Appointments, and the Appointment Secretary serves as a me- 
dium of communication between our students and school officials. 
The purpose of this service Is, first, to foster a spirit of interest and 

32 



(,j co-operation between this School and the public school officials; sec- 
ond, to assist each graduate and others who have had training in this 
School, to secure the kind of position for which they are best fitted 
by education, training and personality. The Committee furnishes con- 
fidential information concerning candidates for the consideration of 
school officials who are about to hire teachers. 

This committee bears a very close relationship to the actual ac- 
complishments of the School and to facilitate this work 

1. It secures information concerning vacancies in schools 
thruout the state, getting in detail the needed information as to 
grades in which vacancies exist and the special demand of such 
positions. 

2. It investigates the records of students in all the depart- 
ments of the school and prepares a report which becomes the 
basis for making recommendations, 

3. It makes definite recommendations of one or more can- 
didates, thus avoiding over- crowding of applications, and at the 
same time preventing the consideration of applicants for types 
of work to which they are not adapted, either by nature or train- 
ing. 

4. It affords teachers better prospects for success, and gives 
school boards better assurance of receiving competent service. 
Records of students are centralized in the Recorder's office and 

students should apply to the Recorder for letters of recommendation 
or statements of any kind concerning work completed in the school. 

The Appointment Committee in addition to dealing with the mat- 
ter of appointments, secures each year, from school boards and super- 
intendents employing our teachers, definite reports concerning the 
success or failure of individuals, and these reports are filed each year 
and become a part of the permanent information, forming a basis for 
recommendations. The work of this bureau serves as a continuing 
bond between the Normal School and its' former students, for it fol- 
lows them up and secures confidential reports of the kind and char- 
acter of work they are doing in their schools. This systematic effort 
to keep in touch with former students, maintains, in spite of distances, 
some semblance of comradeship in educational endeavor. Students" 
who are candidates for certificates or diplomas are advised to register 
with the committee. A small charge is made to partially defray the 
expenses incurred for postage involved in the necessary correspond- 
ence of the committee. 



33 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 



Courses in Outline 

In order to meet the present demands in Idaho this school offers 
several types of courses for the training- of teachers' for rural, village 
and city schools in all grades up to the senior high school. In con- 
tent these courses consist of (1) courses for the instruction of stu- 
denti:! in subjects they may later be expected to teach; and (2) pro. 
fessional courses, dealing with theory and practice of teaching and 
leading to special certificates and life diplomas. 

The courses offered are as follows: 

(a) For the training of teachers for the rural schools, 

(b> For training teachers for general grade work from the 

primary to the senior high school, 

(c) For the training of teachers of special subjects, 

(d) For training principals for town and village schools, 

(e) Extension courses for teachers-in-service, 

GEBfERAIj COURSES. 

The admission requirements to all two-year courses leading to 
graduation is the completion of four years of high school work or its 
equivalent, that is, thirty credits above graduation from the eighth 
grade. 

The General CJoiu-.w for the Training of Grade Teachers (Two 
years). See the Tentative Outline of this course given on page 35. 

The General Course for the Training of Grade Teachers forms tlhe 
basis of the courses known as 

I'rimary Teachers Course (Two years), Designated as Course A_2. 
Ilural Teachers Course (Two years), Designated as Course AJt. 
Town and Village Principals Course. 

(Two years), Designated as Course A- 10. 
Course lor Students who enter with Advanced Standing. 

Designated as Course A-10. 
The minimum linn-, in which this course can be completed is one 
year. The actual time* required for any student entering here from a 
college or other standardized institution to complete this course is de- 
termined by the record submitted to this office and the candidate's 
ability to qualify for teaching. 

HlectlvcH in the special departm(;ntH of manual training and ap- . 
plied arts, fine arts, public school music, or physical education may be 
(combined with the General f^ourse. Students Interested are referred i 
to page ?.l of this bnlletin. 



SPECIAL/ISTS COURSES. 

Home Eiconomics Course (Two years), Designed as Course A-3. 
Open to high school graduates. 
Manuajl Training and Ap 

plied Arts 
Fine Arts 

Public School Music 
Physical Education 

Tentative Outline of the GENERAIi OOURSE) (A-1) 
for the Training of Grade Teachers. 
Junior Year 



These are one-year courses and 
are open only to those who have 
completed a two-year general 
course. See page 37. 



First Quajrter 

Psychology and Observation 
Introductory Education 
A "Subject Matter" course 
i. e. a teacher's course in 
e. g, history, geography, etc. 
Fine Arts (2 days) 
Physical Education (3 days) 
Library Science 



Second Quai-ter 

Psychology and Observation 
A Social Course e. g. sociology, 

or a related course 
A "Subject Matter" course 
Music (2 days) 
Physical Education (3 days) 
One Assigned Elective e. g. a 
course in agriculture, man- 
ual training or applied arts. 

Senior Year. 

Ilrst Quarter 

Practice Teaching ( i^ hour) 
Social Aspects of Education 
One Assigned Elective e. g. in 
home economics, science, or 
geography. 
One Assigned Elective e. g. in 
nnusic, fine arts or physi- 
cal education. 
One Assigned Elective e. g. in 
education — social activities 
or related course. " 

Second Quarter. 
Practice Teaching (% hour) 
Social Aspects of Education 
One Assigned Elective e. g. in 
agriculture, manual training 
or applied arts. 
One Assigned Elective — a social 

course. 
One Assigned Elective. 



Third Quarter 

General Biological Principles 

A "Subject Matter" course 

Art for Teachers 

One Assigned Elective e. g. in 
agriculture, in manual train- 
ing or applied arts. 

One assigned Elective in Phys- 
ical Edn. e. g. First Aid & 
Health Supervision or Educa- 
tional Hygiene. 

Fourth Quarter. 

General Biological Principles. 

A "Subject Matter" course 

Music for Teachers. 

Assisting in the Training School. 

One Assigned Elective e. g. in 
home economics, science or 
geography. 

One Assigned Elective e. g. in 
English, history or mathe- 
matics. 

Third Quarter 

Practice Teaching ( % hour) 
Principles of Education. 
Three Assigned Electives. 



Fourth Quarter 

Practice Teaching (1 hour) 
Principles of Education. 
Three Assigned Electives. 



35 



i 



i 



Primarj', Rural, and Principals Courses. 

These courses are for the most part an adaptation of the work of 
the General Course to meet the special needs of the three types of 
teachers named. 

Two-year courses for primary, or rural teachers or for principals 
are essentially the same as that outlined for the training of teachers 
for grade schools excepting in the matter of electives. See the tenta- 
tive outline of the General Course page 35. Students in their election of 
work are advised to select such courses as their individual needs re- 
quire to make them effective and efficient teachers in the primary 
field, the rural field, or the administrative field as the case may be. 

For special training for those who look forward to filling adminis- 
trative positions in eduactional work, the school purposes to offer def- 
inite preparation. It would be advisable for principals to take 

(1) the semester course in School Administration. 

The first quarter of this course will be devoted to general administra- 
tive problems and the last quarter to problems in supervision. 

(2) courses in English which will give them a ready command of 
themselves when they address a group of people and force in stating 
their remarks. 

(3) vocational work to the extent that they be able to soapervise 
intelligently such work in their own schools. 

Other courses will be added as the need arises. 



Suggestive Outline for the Two-Tear 
RURAL TEACHERS COURSE 
for graduates of four-year high schools 
Junior Year. 

First Quarter 
Psychology and Observation 
General Biological Principles 
General Agriculture 
A Subject Matter Course e. g. a 
to;icher's course in history, 
geography, arithmetic, etc. 
Music for Rural Teachers. 
Physical Education (3 days). 



Second Quarter 

Psychology and Observation. 

General Biological Principles. 

Agrirulture. 

Siibjfrt Matter Cours©. 

Drawing and .irt for Rural 

Schools. 
Physinal Education (3 days). 

Sonlor V<'ar. 

First Quarter. 

Special Mf^thfids, Observation, 
Teaching and Criticism In 
Rural Training Center. 



Third Quarter 

Social Aspects of Education. 

Subject Matter Course. 

Woodwork. 

Three Assigned Electives. 



Fourth Quarter. 

Social Aspects of Education. 

Rural Methods. 

Hondwork for Rural Teachers 

One Assigned Elective. 

Penmanship. 

TTealth and Education (2 days) 



Third Quarter. 

l'rincir)los of lOdiicntion. 
TTiBtory of Education. 
Three Assigned Electives. 



36 



Second Quarter Fourth Quarter 

Rural Social Course e. g. Rural Principles of Education. 

Economics. Psychology of Special Subjects. 

Rural Primary Methods. Rural Sociologry. 

Rural School Management and Two Assigned Electives. 

Organization. 

Library Course for Rural Teach- 
ers. 

One Assigned Elective. 

THE GENERAL TWO-YEAR COURSE 
PLUS 
Electives in a Special Field, 
A high school graduate who wishes to specialize in manual train- 
ing and applied arts, in fine arts, in public school music, or in physical 
ducation may enter upon the work of the special department after 
completing a two-year course which combines general grade teaching 
and some special training in hia, or her, chosen field (three credits in 
the latter field may be assigned during the two-year course). Such se- 
lection of work will be made as to enable all who complete the above 
two-year courses to be recommended for graduation from the General 
Course. Those who wish to specialize fully may by completing a third 
year's work, in which the emphasis is in the special field, receive a spe- 
cialist's diploma in addition to their general diploma. 
College Students Course or Course for Students who enter with Ad- 
vanced Standing. 

For the most part, all who have completed ten (10) or more 
credits of their undergraduate course can complete the general course 
in one year. The work from quarter to quarter shall consist of work 
in education and assigned electives which will best round out their 
preparation for the kind of work they expect to do. Such stu- 
dents must satisfy the school that they are prepared to do the work of 
the regular classes in the course for which they register. They are 
entitled to provisional classification as seniors until such time as their 
previous records have been passed on by the Recorder. A satisfactory 
rating by the Recorder plus one quarter of satisfactory work in prac- 
tice teaching entitles them to become candidates for the diploma and 
regular members of the graduation class. 
Home Economics. 

Home Economics may be combined to advantage with science, art, 
vocational work, or with one of the regular subjects in the junior high 
school. 

The demand for special teachers of home economics who are pre- 
pared to do some other line of school work is increasing every year^ 
and, altho high school graduates may enter and take two years of 
special training in home economics the School advises those who wish 
to become specialists in home economics to follow a plan similar to the 
one worked out above for those interested in the other special depart- 

37 



merits, namely, to precede their highly specializd work toy preparation 
for general teaching. 

Such) a course would require three j^ears for its completion but it 
could be so arranged that the candidate could secure the general dip- 
loma at the end of the second year of work then after a year of teach- 
ing return for the third year of work in which the emphasis would 
be on home economics. Upon the completion of the third year of 
work she would be granted a specialist's diploma in home economics. 
The following is suggestive of the relative emphasis given to home 
economics in the first two years of this three-year course. 

Education 4 credits 

Teachers Courses 3 credits 

Practice Teaching 3 credits 

Assigned Electives 

in the general field 3 credits 

in home economics 3 credits 

Beginners Courses in Art, Music, etc 2 credits 

Free Electives 2 credits 

Total 20 credits 

SPECIALISTS COURSE IN HOME ECONOMICS. 
A two-year course open to High School Graduates. 
Junior Year. 

First Semester. Second Semestei'. 

Psychology and Observation. General Biological Principles. 

EngliS'h. Organic Chemistry and Pood 

General Chemistry. Analysis. 

Junior Sewing. Physiology. 

Food Production and Manufac- .Junior Cookery. 

ture. Methods in Home Economics. 

General Art (9 weeks). 
Home Decoration and Costume 
Designing (9 weeks). 

Senior Year. 

IMrst Semester. Second Semestea*. 

Sociology. Principles of Elducation. 

Teaching and Criticism in Home Bacteriology. 

Economics. Senior Cookery. 

Phy.Miological Chemistry. Senior Sewing. 

Hyi^icnn and Sanitation. Assignod Elective e. g. in edu- 

Senif>r Cookery. cation, subject matter course, 

Senior Sewing (9 weeks). etc. 

CKRTIFlOAlTir, COIIRSKS. 

Suggestive Outline for the ONE-YEAR 

Rural Teachers Course. 

The course is oj^on to graduates of four year High schools and its 

completion entitles the student to a certificate to teach and to Senior 

cluHHlflcation In t he Two-Year General Course. It Is designed especially 

38 



for those students who can spend but one year in the normal school 
prior to their first teaching". 

nrst Quarter. Third Quarter. 

Psychology' and Observation. Rural a'ocial Course. 

General Agriculture. Subject Matter Course. 

Art for Rural Teachers (2 days). Rural Methods. 

Music for Rural Teachers (3 Two Assigned Electives. 

days). 
Rural Social Course e. g. 

Rural Sociology. 
Physical Education (2 days). 
Penmanship (3 days). 

Second Quarter. Fourth Quarter. 

Psychology and Observation, '.Special Methods, Oibservation, 

A Subject Matter Course e. g. Teaching and Criticism in Rur- 

a teacher's course in history, al Training Center. 

geography, arithmetic, etc. 
Rural Social Economics (2 days) 
Rural Applied Arts (3 days). 
One Assigned Elective. 

The above course has in mind the inclusion of various elements 
which experience has shown should enter into the preparation of a 
rural teacher in so far as this can be accomplished in one year. Such 
modifications and substitutions will be made in the program as the 
best interests of the student and the work for which he, or she, is 
preparing demands. The quarter's work at the Rural Training Cen- 
ters includes both practice teaching and further work in teaching 
preparation. 

Students who enter with preparation equivalent to three years of 
high school work will be registered for work similar to the above. 
They may become candidates for a normal school certificate upon the 
completion of one year's work directed to the training of rural school 
teachers. 

The credits made in all certificate courses apply on graduation. 
Further information concerning certificate courses may be secured 
by addressing the Office of the President. Please indicate your high 
school preparation and your professional training and experience, if 
any. 
Six Weeks Courses. 

Any student may take work in the Summer Session and receive 
the same permanent credit for it as he would receive for ch,e same 
work if completed in any quarter of the regular session. 

The desire on the part of the School to provide opportunities for 
those who wish to obtain county and state certificates, or who wish 
to renew them by taking advantage of the provisions cf the State 
Law with respect to professional training, led to the establishment of 
one special six weeks course. This will be offered the first quarter of 
the 1917-1918, beginning September 10, 1917. 

39 



The Training Schools. 



GRAI>ED TRAINING SCHOOIj. 
Function. 

The function of the Training- School as a part of a professional 
school for teachers is primarily (1) to typify the proper procedure 
and equipment of a good elementary school; (2) incidentally to serve 
as a laboratory for the demonstration, to the teachers-in-training, of 
those principles and methods of teaching with which they have be- 
come acquainted in the classes in theory. The Training School also 
offers to teachers-in-training, of advanced standing, the opportunity for 
actual teaching under expert supervision and under conditions that ap- 
proximate the conditions which they will meet in their later work as 
teachers. 

That the time spent in observation iby the teachers-in-training may 
be of the greatest value to them, it follows that the teaching done in 
the Training School must be of the highest possible order. To this end 
only the most competent supervisors and instructors of experience are 
employed, and only students of advanced standing are allowed to teach, 
and then only under the direction, observation and criticism of the 
supervisors. 
Organization. 

That the condition under which this teaching is done may approxi- 
mate as nearly as possible the actual conditions of public school teach- 
ing the endeavor has been made to effect an organization siuch as one 
would find in a town school of the best standing. This organization is 
based primarily on the six and six plan and offers the work of the 
Junior High School. Below the seventh grade the work is depart- 
mental only in such special subjects as music, physical education, 
household arts. Above the sixth grade the work is departmental in all 
tranches. All the children, including the seventh, eighth and ninth 
grades, are grouped under room-supervisors whose foremost consider- 
ation Is the welfare of the children under their charge. 

A special bulletin on the Cour.se of Study in the Training School 
will be sent upon request. Address the Office of the President. 

Tlio Mothers' Club organized this year by the Primary Depart- 
ment rnfflH the third Tuesday in each month of the regular session. 
This dub was organized primarily for the purpose of securing the 
closest cooperation between th-e home and the school, to establish 
right relations between parent and teacher, changing criticism to co- 
operation; and secondarily to ^Tivc the student teachers an opportunity 
to learn how to conduct such meetings. Any mother or teacher of the 
children in the training school is eligible to member.«^hip. At these 
meetings topics are discussed concerning the management of the school 
and Its curriculum; and particular problems pertaining to the work 
of each grade. Any suggestions from parents and teachers which 

40 



promise greater efficiency in the school and a more complete coopera- 
tion between the school and the community, will be kindly received 
and duly considered. 

RURAIi TRAINING CENTERS. 

Purpose. 

The first purpose in the operation of the rural training schools is 
to provide typical rural schools in representative rural communities 
that will afford the best possible educational conditions to the chil- 
dren and patrons of these communities. 

The second purpose is to offer to those students who will teach 
in the rural schools, the opportunity to work out, under skilled super- 
vision, the better principles and more fruitful methods of class room 
practice, and to g-ain a conception of the organization of the machin- 
ery of a school to meet the special needs of each community. 

Organization. 

The rural training schools are made as nearly typical as possible. 
They are in no sense "Model Schools." In each instance the Normal 
School makes an arrangement with a rural school district board for 
the use of the school plant as a normal training center. 

During the past year four such centers have been maintained vary- 
ing in distance from five to eighteen miles from Lewiston. Six are 
planned for the coming year. 

Six students are sent to each of these centers each quarter of nine 
weeks. These students live in the community and devote their entire 
time to a study of the school and community problems. The students 
are encouraged into leadership of community activities, they observe 
the work of the school, they make a study of special rural sichool meth- 
ods and gradually take over the w^ork of instruction and management. 

Each school is in charge of a member of the Normal School fac- 
ulty who is a skilled supervisor with special training and experience 
in rural school work. This supervisor also acts as dean of women to 
the students while under her charge. 



41 



Description of Courses by Department. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION. 

Mr. Elliott, Mr. Millay, Mr. Willson, Mr. Chessman, Miss McCoy. 

Course 1. Psychology and Observation. (2 Quarters). Offered 
each semester. A study of the fundamental factors and processes In 
the psychology of learning-. Cases found both in and out of school life 
analj^zed to familiarize student with the method of learning, and make 
him sensitive to symptoms of mental activity and retardation. The 
result aimed at is a scientific attitude toward teaching and the be- 
ginnings of rationalized skill in school procedure. Frequent visits to 
classes where teaching is going on will be made, in order to get cases 
for analysis and illustration. Psychological theory is to grow up out of 
and in the midst of practice. 

Course 2. General Biological Principles. (2 Quarters). Offered 
each semester. Designed to give the student (1) a general conception 
of the fundamental laws and principles upon which biological develop- 
ment depends. (2) the biological foundations for diagnosing educa- 
tional and social problems and working out moral and religious ele- 
ments of human life will be considered. 

Course 3. Social Aspects of Education. (2 Quarters). Offered 
each semester. Consideration of typical forms of social life for the 
purpose of seeking the educational elements that tend toward advance- 
ment and those which tend to deter progress. The curriculum will also 
be investigated from this point of view. 

Course 4. History of Edmuition. (2 Quarters). Offered once dur- 
ing the year. The more important epochs of educational history with 
special emphasis on their social interpretation with its lessons for the 
present and further development of education. School materials and 
activities and ideals seen as tools for accomplishing specific results. 

Course 5. Principles of I^dncation. (2 Quarters). Offered once 
during the year. Basal necessity of education; its aim; correlative na- 
ture of education for social efficiency and education as self-develop- 
ment; native tendencies as the materials of education; the principles 
of selection of .subject matter, and conditions without which subject 
matter selected may not become genuine information to the students 
who are attacking it; these and similar problems intended to h«lp the 
student teachers begin constructive thinking and modify our methods 
of in.«-rt.ruction and materials of education into such practices as will be 
in conformity with our best educational ideals and professions. 

CourHc «. TJk' Ivo«I<" of Siibjt^crt Matt<;r. (1 Quarter). Offered 
once during the year. An understanding of the various subject mat- 
tern of the public Hchool ;is tool.s for developing and organizing into 
off*'rtIve form, ff)r the concerns of life, the growing experience of youth. 
Th« functions of the subjects; and their interdependence. Their history 

42 



in order to emphasize their instrumental value to the processes of civ- 
ilization, as those processes take place in the expanding life of the indi- 
vidual children and young people. 

Course 7. Sociology, Social Origin and Social Organization. (1 
Quarter). Offered twice during the year. Intended to induct students 
into the analysis of social structures and their functions as social pro- 
cesses, thus enabling them to participate effectively in the intelligent 
attack on social problems, and to support those elements and processes 
which are making for social welfare. 

Course 8. Rural Sociology. (1 Quarter). Offered twice during 
the year. A consideration of the social conditions of rural communi- 
ties, together with the forces of improvement and the direction the 
action must take. 

Course 9. Introductory Efducation. (1 Quarter). An orienting 
course in education aiming primarily to fulfill a "guidance" function. 
The various types of teaching made clear. Specific qualities essential 
to success in each type of work. 

Course 10, Rural Economics. (1 Quarter). Fundamental prin- 
ciples of economics. Principles applied to problems of production, dis- 
tribution and consumption in rural communities with special reference 
to economic conditions in Idaho and the Northwest. 

Course 11. School Management and School IJaw. (1 Quarter). 
Offered twice during the year. The problem of rural schoolroom ad- 
ministration with special emphasis on the dailj program. A presenta- 
tion of the general and specific provisions of Idaho school laws and a 
comparison of Idaho laws with similar provisions in other states. 

Course 12. General Methods. (1 Quarter). Offered twice dur- 
ing the year. A discussion of the common principles and methods of 
procedure of teaching the common branches. 

Course 13. Rural Vocational Course. (1 Quarter). Offered each 
quarter. A practical and concrete course making the needs of the 
farm home the basis of all occupational work suitable for seventh and 
eighth grades under rural school conditions. Possibilities of home 
projects, boys' and girls', agricultural, home economics and farm handi- 
craft clubs as educational agencies under the direction of the school. 
The development of a real farm culture and the responsibility of the 
rural schools toward that end. 

Course 14. Rural Methods. (1 Quarter). Offered each quarter. 
This course will precede the work in practice teaching in the rural 
training centers. A study of the best methods of teaching the com- 
mon school subjects under rural school conditions. Economy of time, 
application of the principles of education, adoption of the Idaho Course 
of Study and text books to meet rural community needs and the social- 
ization of all school subjects will be emphasized. 

Course 15. School Administration. (2 Quarters, a semester 

43 



course). This is a course offered for those who are making special 
preparation for administrative positions. The first quarter's work 
deals with problems of administration and the work of the second 
quarter emphasizes problems of supervision. 

TEACHERS COURSES OR SUBJECT MATTER COURSES. 

(General Subjects) 

Course 1. History and Civics for Teachers. (1 Quarter). Offered 
each quarter. "Materials of History," the elements of which it is 
composed. The organization of thesie materials. The adaptation of 
these materials to the different kinds and grades of work. Methods of 
presentation. A proper understanding of th© term "civics." "Type" 
lessons on state, county and community civics showing kinds of ma- 
terials used and methods of presentation. 

Course 2. Geogiaphy for Teachers. (1 Quarter). Offered each 
quarter. Minimum essentials of locations. Method of drill. Relation 
of topography and climate to natural wealth. Correlation with history 
and language. Use of text and supplementary readers. 

Course 3. Arithmetic for Teachers. (1 Quarter). Offered each 
quarter. Review of work to be accomplished in the primary grades 
and brief discussion of methods of the same. The "right sort" of arith- 
metic, formal and applied; eliminations. Means of securing good re- 
sults, (grades 4-8 inclusive). Typical difficulties met, causes of same, 
methods of overcoming these difficulties. The State Course of Study 
in arithmetic, the state text and supplementary work discussed. Obser- 
vation and discussion of typical lessons. 

Course 4. Science for Elementary Teachers. (1 Quarter). Of- 
fered each quarter. A consideration of type studies in natural science 
adapted to children in the elementary school. Methods of presenting 
science in grades one to six. The treatment includes: function as re- 
lated to structure, physical conditions as effecting living things, strug- 
gle for existence. 

Course 5. English for Teachers. (2 Quarters.) 

(1) Offered first and third quarters. This course emphasizes the 
study of problems involved in training pupils to speak and write better 
English; ways and means of teaching composition, grammar and word- 
study in the elementary and upper grades are investigated. 

(2) Offered second and fourth quarters. Methods of teaching read- 
ing and literature in the intermediate and upper grades. Features of the 
work fire — ways of Imt.rovinq: voice quality; exercise in pronunciation 
and enim< iatlon; way.M of conducting recitations: practice in reading. 

Course 6. Engllwih for Rural Te^M^hers. (1 Quarter). Offered 
twice during the year. This course proposes to awaken a conception 
of the specific problems involved in the teaching of all English sub- 
jects in the country school. 

44 



Course 7. Literature for Pi'imai'y Teacherss. (1 Quarter). Of- 
fered twice during the year. Required of primary specialists. 

Educational value of stories for children. Possibilities for creative 
work. Characteristica of a story. Preparation of a story for telling. 
Story telling. Method of dramatization, A study of folk tales, fairy 
tales, myths, legends, fables, animal stories, realistic stories, and rimes 
and poetry according to their fitness for various age^ and purposes. 

The Teachers Course listed above are offered each quarter with 
the exception of courses 6 and 7. The following plan indicates the 
emphasis given to each quarter's work in courses 1, 2, 3 and 4. One 
quarter the work will be directed especially for primary teachers, an- 
other for elementary and upper grade teachers, and the remaining two 
quarters for rural teachers. 

Teachers Courses in these various departments will be offered for 
Junior High School specialists when there is a demand for the work. 

Course 8. Methods for Junior High School Teachers. (2 Quar- 
ters, a semester course). Offered for all teachers who are going to 
specialize in the Junior high school work. This course is offered once 
during the year. 



PRTMAKY DEPARTMENT. 

Miss Burksi, Miss McDonald, Mrs. Ninneman. 
Course 1. Primary Methods for Specialists. (2 Quarters). Of- 
fered each semester. Required of all students who are taking the Pri- 
mary Specialists' Course (A-2). 

(1) Offered first and third quarters. The aims and principles 
of primary instruction. Current literature on primary methods read 
and discussed. Relation of subject matter and method. The teaching 
process, factors conditioning. Subjects considered: reading, writing, 
drawing, spelling, phonics. A critical study of the modern methods of 
teaching reading. Brief survey of the history of methods. 

(2) Offered second and fourth quarter. Principles applied. Selec- 
tion and organization of subject matter which functions in the child's 
life. Writing of lesson plans. Teaching children how to study. Social 
phases of the recitation. Observation lessons. Subjects considered: 
language, arithmetic, industrial activities. 

Course 2. Primary Methods for General Students.. (1 Quarter). 
Offered twice during the year. Aims and principles of primary in- 
struction. Principles applied in the selection of subject matter and 
materials. Rural problems discussed. Subjects considered: reading-, 
writing, phonics, spelling, language, arithmetic industrial activities. 



45 



I>EPrVRTMlE)NT OF ENGMSH. 

Mr, Fowler, Miss Bauer, Mr. McDonald. 

The Courses of this department are intended to aid students in ac- 
quiring habits of vigorous, clear and correct speech and writing; to 
give them a keener understanding and appreciation of literature, and 
to prepare them to teach English subjects with pleasure and with skill. 

Course 1. General English, (l Quarter), This course is designed 
for all entering students who intend to qualify for practice teaching. 
The purpose of the work is to discover the nature of each student's 
Englisth preparation and to advise him accordingly in regard to the 
pursuit of further English studies. 

Course 2, Written English. (1 Quarter). Offered each quarter. 
A mastery of the principles and habits of correct and effective writing. 
Continuous practice in writing, together with helpful criticism. 

Course 3, Oral Englisli. (1 Quarter). Offered each quarter. De- 
velops logical and orderly thinking, with correct and forceful oral ex- 
pression. The student begins with brief talks from notes. Toward the 
end of the quarter he speaks extemporaneously. Personal interests, 
current events, and professional problems typify the subject-matter of 
this course. 

Course 4. Juvenile Literature (1 Quarter). Offered twice during 
the year. The study of children's interests in literature; wide reading' 
of children's books; the school library. 

Course 5. Reading and Story- telling. (2 Quarters). Emphasis 
ia upon the cultivation of a good reading voice and the development of 
ability to interpret poems and stories th.ru reading and telling. 

Course 6. Sentence Structure. . (1 Quarter). Offered twice dur- 
ing the year. Those whose understanding of English grammar is in- 
sufficient for teaching, have here an opportunity to study the sentence 
in its various aspects, with a view to teaching grammar. Emphasis la 
upon analysis and synthesis of the sentence. 

Course 7, Survey ol" English liiterature. (1 Quarter), Offered 
twice during the year. Extends the students' acquaintance with the 
best English works; fre.shens h.is interest in the subject; gives him a 
basis for good judgment in his own reading as well as in that of his 
pupils. Especial attention is given to the literature of the last decade. 

f bourse H. Survey of AmcHcan liiterature. (1 Quarter), Offered 
twice during the year. Ac;quaintanco with our national literature. This 
course is offered largely as a background for tbo teaching of reading 
and literature In the grades. 

Course 9, Word Study. (1 Quarter), Offered twice during year. 
Spftlling, pronunciation, enunciation, meaning, derivation, and use of 
words in HentcnroH. are matters considered in this course. The aims 
are to make students better Kpellers. to give them a wider working vo- 

46 



cabulary, and to discuss methods for teaching the suoject in the ele. 
nientary school. 

Course 10. Teaching and Criticism in English. (1 Quarter). 
Offered each quarter. Senior will be given practice in the training 
school each quarter. Criticism periods for this course are to be ar- 
ranged with the supervisor. (Mr. Fowler). 

Course 11. Debating. (1 Quarter). Offered twice during the 
year. Study of the principles of argument; brief making, practice in 
debate. A study of present national problems will offer material. 

Course 12. English for Teachers. See page 44. 

Course 13, English for Rural Teachers. See page 44. 

Course 14. Ijiteratiire for Primary Teacher. See page 44. 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND CIVICS. 

Mr. Talkington, Miss Shaff. 
Course 1. American History and National Civics. (1 Quarter). 

Use of historical materials. Development of various political, indust- 
trial and social subjects. Source material and independent investiga- 
tions. History related to problems of life. Intensive study and discus- 
sion of history in the advanced grades. 

Course 2. State Civics. (1 Quarter). The government of Idaho 
consists in the following political units: the Family; the School; the 
Precinct; the City; the County; the State; each of these has a Govern- 
ment provided for it and the object of the course ia to show how that 
Government is administered. 

Course 3. History of i\merican Farm life. (1 Quarter). Farm- 
ing, its origin — the Indian, the Colonial, and the Pioneer periods; 
products; use of machinery; encouragement by cheap lands and by the 
National Government and Agricultural Colleges; Scientific farming. 
Problems of rural life. Prosperity and cooperation. The Country Life 
Commission and its work. America haa ever been a rural nation. An 
understanding and appreciation of the problems of rural life in the 
light of their history is the aim of this course. 

Course 4. History and Civics for Teachers. See page 44. 

Course 5. Teaching and Criticism ii. History. (1 Quarter). Offer- 
ed each quarter. Seniors will be given practice in the training school 
each quarter. Criticism periods for this course are to be arranged 
with the supervisor. (Mr. Talkington). 

Course 6. Pacific Coast History and the History of Idaho. (2 
Quarters). Offered each semester. This course supplements the Pa- 
cific Coast History found in the average text book; furnishes the teacher 
with much suitable material for primary and intermediate grades, and 
treats briefly the history of Idaho. 



Course 7. History Stories on Indian and Pastoral Life for the 
Primary Grades. (1 Quarter). Some of the topics discussed are: In- 
dian myths; food, clothing- and shelter; snares, traps, implements and 
utensils; the peace pipe and methods of war; the medicine man and the 
Indian's care of hia body; the Potlatch and Indian hospitality. 

Domestic animals; house and household furniture; manner of 
planting, cultivating and harvesting grain; social conditions including 
games, sports; manner of travel on land and water; gcvernment; early 
religious ideas and customs. 

Course 8. Modem European History. (2 Quarters). Territorial 
expansion and confederation. Separation of Church and State. Inter- 
nal development. Political growth and extension of suffrage. Rise of 
socialism and the growth of democracy. Change in educational ideals. 
Increasing conflict between Labor and Capital. Modern ideas of war 
and peaceful methods of settling international disputes. The course 
presents th«.se new and larger movements. 

Course 9. Idaho History and Pioneer Stories of the Northwest. (1 
quarter). The following general epochs are used as a basis for this 
course: exploration, routes to the Pacific coast, the fur-trading era, 
the Misfsionary period, the Emigrant, the mining era, Indian wars, or- 
ganization of territory and admission of States, development of State 
institutions. 

Course 10 and 11. Historic Scenes and Persons. 
in European History, 
in American History. 

Courses 13 and 14. History Stories on the Beginning of National 
European 
American 

Course 15. Ijatin America. 

Course 16. Modem Asia. 



DKPARTrMIENT OF MATHIEMATIOS. 

Mr. Chessman. 

Course 1. Applle<l AHthmotic. (1 Quarter). A general review 
course in subject matter. Drill work on fundamental operations. Much 
problem work, emphasis on farm problems — buying, selling, commis- 
sions, insurance, taxes, notes, mortgages, depreciation; measurement, 
value of cropa, land, etc.; construction problems — wood, cement; me- 
chanics — lever, pulleys, horpe power, inclined plane, good roads, gaso- 
line cnp:ine; conFtitucnts (percentages), fodder, soils, fertilizers, sprays, 
dairy problems; household and farm budgets and acounts. 

Course 2. Teaching and Criticism in Arithmetic. (1 Quarter). 
Offered each quarter. Seniors will be given practice In the training 

48 



school each quarter. Criticism periods for this course are to be ar- 
ranged with the supervisor. (Mr. Chessman). 

Course 3. Modem Elementary Mathematics. (2 Quarters, a 
semester course.) Offered once during the year. For students who 
wish to specialize in junior high school mathematics and science. The 
supplementary aspect of the several branches of secondary mathemat- 
ics is recognized and the work is presented from a unified point of 
view. Number, symbol and form or arithmetic, algebra and geometry 
frequently enter into the same problem and the result is economy of 
time and richer content. 

The Teachers Course in this department is scheduled each quar- 
ter. One quarter the work will be directed especially for primary 
teachers, another, for elementary and upper grade teachers, and the 
remaining two quarters for rural teachers. 

Course 4. Arithmetic for Teachers. See the outline given on page 
44. 

Junior High School work in Mathematics will be extended when 
the demand is sufficient. 



RURAIi DEPARTMENT. 

Mr. Millay, Mr. Osborne, Miss McDonald, Miss Wiseman, Miss Minger, 
Miss Hansen, Mrs. Lockwood, 

Course 1. Rural Methods listed under department of Education. 

Course 2. Rural Sociology listed under department of Education. 

Courses. Rural Training Centers. (1 Quarter). Methods, Obser- 
vation, Teaching and Criticism. 

Rural Courses offered by the several departments are listed un- 
der the department, for example. Rural Home Economics is listed 
on page 56. 

Agriculture Courses (4-10). 

Course 4. Introductory Agriculture. (1 Quarter). Ofered twice 
during the year. This course is an introduction to Agriculture 
thru a study of such phases of Animal Husbandry, Gardening and Fruit 
Growing as can be taught in the rural schools by practical demonstra- 
tion. 

Course 5. Soils. (1 Quarter). Offered twice during year, A 
study of the origin, classification, composition, physical condition and 
general treatment of soils and the scientific basis of tillage to main- 
tain soils in the highest state of fertility. To give practical experience 
much of the work will be done in the field. 

Course 6. Vegetable Gardening. (1 Quarter). Offered twice dur- 
ing the year. An intensive study of gardening with special reference 
to the use of gardening as an educational factor in the schools. Em- 
phasis on soils, fertilizers, seed-testing, insecticides and elementary 



plariv physiologry, and similar phases of agriculture that lead up to the 
planting of the spring gardens. 

Course 7. Animal Husbandry. (1 Quarter). Offered twice dur- 
ing the year. A study of the different breeds of livestock, including 
practical experience in judging, the balancing of rations, and the gen- 
eral management of farm animals. 

Course 8. Poultry Keeping. (1 Quarter). Offered twice during 
the year. Incubation, brooding, feeding and management of fowls, 
including practical experience in judging. The laboratory work will 
consist of making poultry appliances such as self-feeders, trap-nests 
and brooders. The school is provided with good poultry equipment. 

Course 9. Farm Mechanics. (1 Quarter). Offered twice during 
the year. Practical construction work such as cement work, includ- 
ing building of cement walks, cement models of silos and cement posts. 
Testing of cement, rope splicing and halter-making. When car- 
pentry problems present themselves, building construction will be 
given. 

Course 10. Fi^uit Growing-. (1 Quarter). Offered once during 
the year. Designed for those students who are likely to teach in the 
fruit g-rowing -sections of Idaho. A study of the essential elements in 
soils for different fruits, the location of sites, marketing, making of 
sprays, pruning, budding, grafting and the identification of insect and 
fungus diseases will be made. The nearnessi of orchards and small 
fruit gardens to the campus allows this course to be made extremely 
practical. 



DEPARTMENT OF MANUAIi TRAINING AND APPLJED ARTS. 

Miss McGahey. 

Course 1. Woodwork for Beginners. (1 Quarter). Use of com- 
mon tools; making of a few projects; working drawing of at least one 
project; recognition of a few phy.sical charactoristicsj of wood; simple 
ataining and finiHliing; .suggestions as to plans and organization. 

Course 2. Wowlwork. (1 Quarter). Further use of tools, par- 
ticularly the chisel; drawing and making projects involving use of lap 
and groove joints; the uses and characteristics of wood, and industrial 
significance. i 

Courses .3 and 4. W<K)dwork and Womlwork Advanced. (1 
Quarter e;ich). More .skillful use of tool.s; more complicated joints; 
study tools and fastenings used; study of types of construction — ap-| 
plications In projects made in shop; more detailed study of material.' i 
and Industrial proceHses; methods of finishing woods; social signlfl 
c.'ince. i 

fUnirw.H 1, 2, ?. .'ind 4 constitute a full year of work. I 

Course 5. Rural Woodwork. (1 Quarter). Offered twice durlnjT 
the year. Use of a few common tool.s; making of a few articles 0, 

r>0 I 



lvalue on the farm. Comparisons and notes on aifflculties involved; 
making a working drawing of at least one project; simple staining and 
finishing; suggestions as to equipment; work to be given place in 
the program. 

Course 10. Constriiction of Playground Apparatus. (1 Quarter). 
Offered twice during the year. A study of playground apparatus; ma- 
: iterials, means of construction and prices; drawing of plans for differ- 
ent pieces of apparatus; construction of same to scale. 
I Course 7. Mechanical Drawing. (2 Quarters). Offered once dur- 

3 ing the year. The use of instruments; plates in straight lines and 
!3urves; lettering; geometric problems practical for woodwork con- 
; i3truction; working drawings; simple principles of orthographic proj- 
. ection. 

s, Course 8. Teaclilng and Criticism in Manual Training. (1 Quar- 

ter). Seniors will be given practice in the training school each quar- 
ter. Criticism periods for this course are to be arranged with the 
supervisor. (Miss McGahey.) 

Course 9. Handwork for Rural Teachers. (1 Quarter). Offered 
aach quarter. Various kinds of handwork from the standpoint of the 
rural school. The use of materials easy to obtain and requiring mini- 
mum of equipment and supervision. The enriching of the regular 
ichool curriculum thru manual arts. 

Course 10. Advanced Applied Arts. (1 Quarter). Bsusketry. 
Leather cutting and tooling. Copper sawing and etching. Wood 
Dlack printing. Stencil printing. Card board construction. 

Classes will be organized in woodwork for two-year Rural stu- 
ients and for Home Economics students when there is sufficient de- 
nand for these courses. 



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DEPARTMENT OF PUBMC SCHOOIj MUSIC AND PIANO. 

Mrs. Treadwell, Miss Jones. 

Course 1. Sight Singing. (1 Quarter). Offered each quarter, 
clote song used as basis for technical work. Simple rhythmic types, 
line major keys, chromatic tones, ear training, individual work em- 
Jhasized. 

The content of course 1 is adapted to the needs of rural teachers. 

Course 2. Public School Music for Teachers. (1 Quarter). Of- 
ered twice during the year. Prerequisite — Course 1 or an equivalent, 
-^ctures, discussions and required readings on ways of presenting 
mxiaic in primary and upper grades. Study of song and technical ma- 
erial used, class demonstrations. 

Course 3. Advanced Sight Singing. (1 Quarter). Offered twice 
luring the year. Prerequisite Course 1 or an equivalent. Fifteen 
Tiajor keys. Bass clef, Part-work, modulations, ear training. 

Course 4. Harmony (3) and Ear Training (2). (1 Quarter). 



51 



Offered the first quarter. The Harmony courses develop in students a 
broader appreciation of good music and of the works of the great mas- 
ters. 

Ability to recognize and execute scales, intervals and simple chords, 
and simple chord connections with their inversions in a given bass or 
a given soprano. 

Ear training, tone thinking, recognition of rhythmic and tonal 
sequences as heard. 

Course 5. Harmony (2) and Conducting: (3). (1 Quarter). Of- 
fered the second quarter. Chord connection continued into more 
complex forms, Keyboard work continued. Original work in long 
meter; short meter. 

Conducting furnishes opportunities for becoming- familiar with 
chorus material for upper grades and high schools and for practice 
in conducting the material studied. 

Course 6. Harmony (3) and Child Voice (2). (1 Quarter). Of- 
fered the third quarter. Chord connection continued. Simple forms 
of modulations. Keyboard work continued. 

Lectures, discussions and required readings on the physiology of 
the voice, the car& of child's voice, naonotonos. 

Course 7. Harmony (3) and History of Music (2). (1 Quarter). 
Offered the fourth quarter. Courses 6, 7, 8 and 9 makes a continuous 
year's work. Chord connection continued; Keyboard work continued; 
Analysis of some of the Bach Chorals. More original work. 

Lectures, required readings and reports on History of Music from 
primitive times thru the classical period. Illustrations on victrola and 
piano player. 

Course 8. Appreciation. (1 Quarter). Offered each quarter. 
Students are afforded opportunities for becoming familiar with stand- 
ard and classic compositions and to develop a love for good music. 
Victrola and piano player are used. 

Course 9. History of Music (3) and Form (2). (1 Quarter). 
Offered twice during the year. A study of the Romantic writers. Il- 
lustrations on victrola and piano player. 

A study of design in the structure of musical composition. Vic 
trola and piano player are used. 

Course 10. History of Music and Supervision.. (1 Quarter). Of- 
fered twice during the year. Later 19th century writers; American 
music. 

Discussions on supervision of grade teachers; planning of courses; 
outlines. 

Course 11. Teaching and Criticism of Music. Offered each quar- 
ter. Seniors will be given practice in the training school each quarttf. 
Criticism periods for this course are to be arranged with the suptj- 
visor. fMrvS. Treadwell). 




l''AI\H)irs l'|("IM'KI<:s I 'OS 10 1; ilY STUDENTS 



Course 12. Primary Songs. (1 Quarter). This is a beginners 
course for Primary specialists. About one-third of the quarter is 
given to note reading. 

General course students may elect course. 

Course i3. Teaching and Criticism of Music. Offered each quar- 
ter. Seniors will be given practice in the training school each quar- 
ter. Criticism periods for this course are to be arranged with the 
supervisor. (Mrs. Treadwell). 

Chorus. Meets Tuesdays and Thursdays at 10:30 thruout the year. 

Glee Club Work and Orchestra will be continued. E2ach group 
meets one evening a week. 

The Teachers Course in this department is scheduled each quar- 
ter. One quarter the work will be directed especially for primary 
teachers, another, for elementary and upper grade teachers, and the 
remaining two quarters for rural teachers. 



DEPARTMENT OF FINE ARTS. 

Miss Hong. 

Course 1. Fine Art for Rural Teachers. (1 Quarter). Offered 
iviice during the year. Design, Representation, Art Appreciation. 
Practical art related to everyday life. Cultivation of the taste in 
choosing clothes and home furnishings. 

Course 2. General Art Course. (2 Quarters). A combination of 
fine and applied arts for primary, rural and general course students. 

Design: Study of the principles of design, line-harmony, dark 
and light and color. Application of designs to constructions varies to 
suit all grades. Materials are clay, reed and raffia, paper, cardboard 
and wood. 

Representation: Drawing from nature, still life, posing and out- 
door sketf:hing. Decorative treatment of nature drawing. 

Art Appreciation: Study of the finest painting, sculpture, and 
architecture. School room decoration. Flower arrangement. Cost- 
ume designing. 

Note: After the first quarter of this course those students who 
are specializing in primary work enter the course in art for primary 
teachers which is listed as industrial Arts for Primary Teachers. 
Teachers of elementary and upper grades and junior high school 
teacher? may, at the close of the first quarter's work, transfer from 
the general art course to a teachers art course for their special grades. 

Course 2. Industrial Arts for Primary Teachers. (1 Quarter). 
One quarter of fine art or the equivalent is a prerequisite for this 
f'ourse. Art work considered by grade. Correlation of Art with other 
subjects. Methods of preserving Art. Observation of Art teaching in 
lower grades. 

Course 4. Costume Design. (1 Quarter). Design in costume. 
rhythm of line, harmonies of tone. Sketching gowns and hats. Origi- 

53 



nal designs for gowns and hats of various types. Pencil, pen and ink, 
water polor and black board drawing. (This course is open to stu- 
dents who have completed General Art.) 

Course 4. Home Planning: and Decoration. (1 Quarter). Prin- 
ciples of spacing, dark and light, and color applied to the problems of 
the home; economics of furnishing and decorating. Designing 
schemes for rooms; and for embroidery and textiles. Furniture de 
signing. Visits to shops. 

Course 5. Art History and Appreciation. (1 Quarter). An ap 
preciative study of painting, sculpture, architecture and design in hiii 
torical development. This course is illustrated by prints and lantern 
slides. 

Course 6. Advanced Fine Arts. (1 Quarter). Study of line-haj 
mony, space filling, distribution of dark and light in a space, tone val 
ues and color harmony. Application in practical designs for embroid 
ery, weaving, and for working in paper, metal and wood. Freehani 
drawing in pencil and charcoal from objects, figure and landscape 
Painting the same subjects in water color, oil paints and pastel 

The Teachers Course in this department is scheduled each quai 
ter. One quarter the work will be directed especially for primar: 
teachers, another, for elementary and upper grade teachers, and 
remaining two quarters for rural teachers. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAIi EDUCATION. 

, Miss Thompson. 

Course 1. Anatomy. (4 Quarters). Offered once during 



year. A study of the structure of the human body with especial rel 
erence to the needs of Physical Education. 

Course 3. Theory of Playground and Plays and Games. (1 QuaM 
ter). Offered twice during the year. The theory and practice whlcll 
Is basal for the teacher of playground work; the origin and develoPi 
ment of the play movement in America; theories of play as a facte 
in education advanced by Spence, Schiller, Groos, Froebel, Hall, ail> 
others; special attention to the construction of, equipment of, aS 
supervision of playgrounds and play schools. 

Presents singing games, dramatic games, and competitive gam* 
Games suitable for playground use, classified according to grades aH 
seasons. 

Course 3 Corrective Gymnastics (2). First Aid and Health S» 
pt^rvlHlon (3), (1 Quarter). Offered once during the year. Tit 
course ip designed for the benefit of Normal School students who thJ 
deformltv or unusually poor development are unable to proceed i 
rapidly as the others, or who are in need of corrective gymnastll 
The exercises used are to be considered as an appendix to education 
rymnasti^H. 



•It 
1 



Quar 

quart 

the SI 

C 

Quan 

ical -.1 

them 

ofino 

ancei 

CottfK 

Tl 

sicalo 

teachii 

(S 



64 



I 



Practical knowledge in the recognition of the nature of an ac- 
cident or emergency and application of First Aid. Hints as to what 
should be done first in case of bites, wounds, contusions and bruises, 
burns, frost bites, foreign bodies in throat, nose, ear, eye. 

Course 4. Antliropomctry and Physical Diagnosis (3), and Ijit- 
eratuiv of Physical Education (2). (1 Quarter). Offered once dur- 
ing the year. A study of the bidy activities of primitive man, eariy 
physical training among the Greeks and Romans and the transition 
thru the mediaeval to modern systems of physical education. 

Instruction and practice in making examinations of children. 
Physical measurements made with a view to determining the assign- 
ment of special work. 

Course 5. Kuiesiology, and Physiology of Exercise. (2 Quarters). 
Offered one semester. Treats of the science of educational gymnastics,, 
dealing with the mechanics, effects and classification of special exer- 
cises. In it the student will receive ideas in the (a) choice of exer- 
cises (b) progression within the lesson itself and in the succession of 
lessons, (c) apparatus (d) index to the nomenclature used in all 
systems of Physical Education • e) the study of physiological effects cf 

! exercise and medico-gymnastic exercises used in educational gym- 
nastic. 
1 Course 6. Physical Traintpig for Teachers. (1 Quarter). Of- 

I fered twice during the year. Consideration of the aim of educational, 
[ corrective, and recreative gymnastics; choice of exercise, (local or 
general effects); factors determining the amount of exercise that is 
desirable; mode of progression from exercise in the same lesson and 
from the movements of one lesson to those of another; duration of 
movement as well as lesson; giving commands, correct clothing; us- 
ing rooms or corridors for the exercises, the "drill" idea eliminated. 

Course 7. Teaching and Criticism in Physical Education. (1 

Quarter). Offered each quarter. Seniors will be given pacti-^e each 
quarter. Criticism periods for this course are to be arranged witU 
the supervisor. 

Course 8. Histoi-y and Literature of Physical Education. (1 
Quarter). A studyof the bodily activities of primitive man, early phys- 
ical training among the Grades and Romans and their transition thru 
the mediaeval to modern systems of physical educations. The pioneers 
of modern physical education are taken up in order of their appear- 
ance in each country. 
Courses 9-12 Dancing. 

This course presents folk, natural, gymnastics, aesthetic and clas- 
sical dancing including a study of history of the work and methods of 
teaching it. 

(9). Elementary Dancing. (First Quarter). Daily practice in 
technique, comprehensive study of fundamental principles upon 

5& 



which all forms of dancing are built. Combinations and follow steps 
taken from Mauthe, Gilbert and Chalif. Rhythmic work and a few 
dances for beginners. 

(10). Folk Dancing and Festival Work. (Second Quarter). 
More advanced rhythmic work. Folk Dances of European countries 
in their traditional form as taken from Hoffer, Burchnal and Cramp- 
ton. 

(11). Aesthetic Dancing. (Third Quarter)." Classic and aesth- 
etic dancing. Appreciation and interpretion of dancing. 

(12). Interpretative Dancing. (Fourth quarter). Origin of 
dancing; Dancing in the middle ages; use of the dance; Modern ten- 
dencies. History of dancing. Dance Composition, and dancing from 
the teacher's standpoint — the method of introducing the various kinds 
of dancing into the school systems. 

Course 13. Swimming. Credit is given in this work when stu- 
dents learn to swim using breast stroke, side stroke, and swimming 
on back. They v/ill also be taught how to drive and resuscitate. 
Class meets two or three times a week. It may alternate with Tennis 
or Junior Gymnasium. 

Course 14. Tennis. Class meets two or three times a week. It 
may alternate with Swimming or Junior Gymnasium. 
Coiir.scs 15-18. Junior Gymnasium. 

(15). First Quarter. Marching, simple tactics, calishenics, and 
dumb-bells. 

(16). Second Quarter. Advanced marching tactics, folk danc- 
ing, spring and fall festivals and wands. 

(17). Third Quarter. Apparatus work, chest weights, ropes, etc., 
and athletics, particularly the coaching and refereeing of basket ball, 
indoor base ball, tennis, volley ball, Newcomb, 

(18). Fourth Quarter. Fundamental principles of school gym- 
nastics, pose. Consideration of the aim of educational, corrective 
and recreative gymnastics, advanced floor work and Indian clubs. 
See course 6. 



DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS. 

Miss McCollister, Miss McHugh. 

Course 1. Food rroduction ami Manufacture. (2 Quarters) The 
source, manufacture and preparation of food products with conditions 
and laws regulating the same. 

Course 2. Rural Home Fx^onomics. (1 Quarter). Lectures, discus- 
sions and laboratory work. Problems selected for detailed study. 
Bibliographies and reports. Development, meaning and function of 
Home Kconomics. The function of teachers of home economics. 
Rural conditions and home economics. Problems of the rural house- 
wife. AgontH or agencies available. Resources of the rural home. 

56 



Home economics taught in rural schools, — equipment, texts, courses, 
correlation. Hot lunches, — organization and management. 

Course 3. Rural Cookery.. (1 Quarter). Offered three quarters 
during the year. Food preparation through actual practice. Serving 
of simple meals. The care of the home, school room, etc. Cookery 
equipment. The serving of school lunches. How to deal with simple 
abnormal digestive tracts. 

Course 4. Textiles. (1 Quarter). A study of the various fibres 
with emphasis on their source, durability, adaptability and reactions 
to different agents. 

Course 5. Junior Domestic Science. (2 Quarters). Offered one 
semester. The source, manufacture and preparation of foods and 
food products. A review of composition of foods, evolving principles 
upon which preparation depends. A working knowledge of how foods 
are made digestive and nutritious. Elementary course in preparing 
and serving meals. 

Course 6. Housekeeping, and Gieneral Household Administra- 
tion. (2 Quarters). Offered each semester. Food principles, food 
preparation, the care of the house, household management, launder- 
ing and cleaning. 

Course 7. Home Economics for Teachers. (1 Quarter). Offer- 
ed twice during the year. A discussion of equipment, syllabi, and 
course for home economics. Lesson plans are made and actually car- 
ried out in practice. 

Course 8. Teaching and Criticism in Home Economics. (1 Quar- 
ter). At least 2 quarters teaching for A-3 students. Offered each 
quarter. Seniors will be given practice in training school each quar- 
ter. Criticism periods for this course are to be arranged with the 
supervisor. 

Course 9, Table Service (7 weeks) and liunch-room Mtuiagement 
(2 weeks). Offered twice during the year. Lunch-room equipment is 
discussed and the actual managing of the lunch-room will be required 
of the Seniors in Home Economics. 

The class is divided into groups of two. Each group takes charge 
of and supervises the lunch-room for one week. Training school chil- 
dren assist in the general care of the lunch-room. Especially valuable 
for students who will teach in rural schools as well as for those who 
expect to teach Home Economics. 

Course 10. Advanced Cookery. (1 Quarter). Offered twice 
during the year. Advanced Cookery is a review of food contents and 
principles of food preparation involving the computation of cost and 
nutritive value. 

Course 11. Dietics. (1 Quarter). Offered twice during the year. 
Dietaries appropriate for particular abnormal cases. Assembling of 
typical meals for such eases. 

67 



Course 12. Junior Domestic Art. (4 Quarters). A continuous 
course from September to June. A basal course in equipment used in 
domestic art and a foundation upon which to build. Drafting and 
cutting of patterns; a study of textiles is made. Each student makes 
a suit of underwear. Note books are required. 

Course 13. Dressmakini?. .1 Quartan. Offered once during the 
year. Course 12 is prerequisite. Offered to those who know how to 
sew and who wish a dressmaking course. Will probably be offered 
the third quarter. 

Course 14. Senior Domestic Art. (4 Quarters). A continuous 
course from September to June. Continuation of Junior Domestic Art. 

Dressmaking. Art needle work. Methods in teaching sewing. 
Drafting and cutting patterns; and use of commercial patterns. 

Course 15. Art Needlework. (1 Quarter). Offered only the third 
and fourth quarters of the year. Practice in making all the fancy 
stitches with application to suitable material and appropriateness of 
design. 

Course 16. Fancy Cookery and Table Service. (1 Quarter). 
Elective. Offered each quarter if there is sufficient demand. Course 
5 is prerequisite. The preparation of more elaborate dishes than those 
prepared in Course 5. 



DEPARTMENT OF SCIENOE 

Miss Tyler, Miss McEachran. 
Course 1. General Chemistry. (2 Quarters, a semester course). 

Offered during the second semester. Lectures and laboratory work. 
An introduction to general applied chemistry. 

Course 2. Organic Chemistry and Food Analysis. (2 Quarters,, 
a semester cour&e). Offered during the second semester. These 
courses alternate. 

Organic Chemistry: Hydro-carbons and their substitution and ad- 
dition products, with special reference to foods and oth«r useful or- 
ganic compounds. 

Food Analysis: Analysis of type foods which illustrate the analy- 
sis of all foods, e. g. baking powder, flavoring extracts, milk, flour, 
water and butter. 

Course 3. Physiological Chemistry. (2 Quarters, a semester course). 
Offered during the first semester. Chemistry of the body and its 
functionvS, with special reference to digestion and food requirements. 
Study of enzymes, salivary, gastric, and pancreatic digestion. 

Note: General Chemistry, Organic Chemistry and Physiological 
Chemistry should be studied in the order listed above. 

Course 4. Bacteriology. (2 Quarters, a semester course). Offer- 
ed during thn second semester. Morphology. Classification of bac- 
teria. Study f)f bacteria found in the home. Making of cultures to 

58 



study the development and products of the same. Disease, cause, im 
munity, practical study and manipulation of disease organisms. 

Course 5. Economic Bacteriology. (1 Quarter). Offered mainly 
for one-year students. Kinds of matter. Chemical change. Matter 
and energy. Studies include the following: Rust. Soil aireation. Com- 
bustion and fuels. Nitrogen In relation to explosives and soil fertility. 
The chemistry of soap making, of phosphorus matches. Chemical pro- 
cesses used in adulterating textiles. Dyeing. Printing. Cement. 

Courses. Elementary Botany. (2 Quarters). Offered during the 
second semester. A fundamental study of plant structure. Function 
of each part. Algae. Fungi and plant diseases. Bacteria. Moss and 
fern plants. Relation of plants to environment. Factors in crop 
production. Classification and recognition of plants. 

Course 9. (Elementary Zoology. (2 Quarters). Offered during 
the first semester. First Quarter: Vertebrates. Second Quarter: 
Invertebrates. 

The materials of life, its properties and laws. Animal functions, 
structure and adaptation®. 

Course 10. General Sanitation. (1 Quarter). This course will 
be offered for one-year students when there is sufficient demand. 

Course 11. Sanitation and Hygiene. (2 Quarters, a semester 
course). Offered during the second semester. Lecture and laboratory 
work. Principles of personal, home and public sanitation. Application 
of these to food, ventilation, water and sewage with study of local 
plants and systems. Posts. Emergencies, Fire prevention. The ethics 
of community sanitation. 

Course 12. Science for Elementary Teachers. See outline given 
on page 44. 

The Teachers Course in this department is scheduled each quar- 
ter. One quarter the work will be directed especially for primary 
teachers, another, for elementary and upper grade teachers, and the 
remaining two quarters for rural teachers. 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY AND GElNERAIi SCIENCE. 

Mr. Reed. 

Course 1. General Science. (1 Quarter). Astronomy as related to 
climate, seasons and time. Heat as a factor is climate. Weather and 
its application to agriculture. Mineralogy. The minerals of Idaho. 
Geology and its relation to topography. 

Course 2. Advanced Geography. (1 Quarter). Commerce of 
Idaho and the Northwest. Commerce of the world — land and water. 
Historical development of commerce. Expansion of our national com- 
merce. Forestry. Reforestation. Deforestation. Forest reserves. 
Products, by products and waste of forests. 

Course 3. Teaching and Criticism in Geography. (1 Quarter). 

59 



Offered each quarter. Seniors will be given practice in the training 
school each quarter. Criticism periods for this course are to be ar- 
ranged with the supervisor. (Mr. Reed). 

Course 4. Geog:i'aphy for Teachers. See page 44. 

The Teachers Course in this department is scheduled each quarter. 
One quarter the work will be directed especially for primary teachers, 
another, for elementary and upper grade teachers, and the remaining 
tw quarters for rural teachers. 



lilBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

Miss Crawford, Mrs. Hibbard. 
liibrary Science. (1 Quarter). Offered each quarter. Use of 
books, — the physical book, reference books, indexes, bibliographies. 
Selection of books and literature for children. Magazines for children. 
Administration of school libraries. Establishment and equipment. 
Library records. Mechanical processes and use of pamphlet and pic- 
ture collections. 



PENMANSHIP. 

Miss Collings. 
Penmanship. A complete course In Palmer method for beginners. 
Special work for the Palmer certificate. 



Summary of Attendance Since 1912. 

1. Session 1912-1913. 

Classified by Year of Course Classified by Course Pursued 

First Year (Eliminated) Course A-1, General 69 

Second Year .... (Eliminated) Course A_2, Primary 20 

Third Year 235 Course A-3, Home Economics 37 

Junior Year 90 Course A-4, General 1-Year 13 

Senior Year 50 Courses B-l_3 Rural 64 

All other Courses 182 



Total Regular Session ....375 

Total in Regular Courses. .. 375 
Summer Session 133 Summer Session 133 

Total Enrollment 508 Total Enrollnaent 508 

The enrollment of the Training School is not included in the above 
totals. 

The enrollment in the training Schools in 1912-1913 was 309. 



60 



2. Session 
Classified by Year of Course 

First Year (;Elimlnated) 

Second Year .... (Eliminated) 

Third Year 174 

Junior Year 51 

Senior Year 138 

Total Regular Session . 363 

Summer Session 186 

Total Enrollment 549 

The enrollment of the Training 
totals. 



1913-1914. 

Classified by Course Pursued 

Course A-1, General 96 

Course A- 2, Primary 41 

Course A-3, Home Economics 27 
Course A-4, General (1-Year) 10 

Courses B_l-3, Rural 65 

All Other Courses 114 



Total in Regular Courses ..363 
Summer Session 186 



Total Enrollment 549 

Schools is not included in the above 



The enrollment in the Training Schools in 1913-1914 was 170. 



3. Sessions II 
Classified by year of Course 

Seniors 74 

Juniors in General Courses. . 70 
Juniors in Certificate Courses 83 
Specials 

in Rural Courses 70 

Piano Students 21 

in six weeks Courses . . 8 
All others 31 



Total in Regular Session, 
Total (Joint) 

Summer Session .... 



357 



)14-1915. 

Classified by Course Pursued 

Course A_l, General 44 

Course A- 2, Primary 24 

Course A-3, Home Economics 30 
(Other Specialists Courses 

(A6, A-7, A-8) 

Course A-4, General (1-year) 16 

Course A-9, Rural "A" 17 

Courses Rural "B" 70 

Other Certificate Courses . . 83 
All other Courses 60 



13 



251 



Total in Regular Session 357 
Total (Joint) 

Summer Session 251 



608 608 

The enrollment in the Training Schools is not included in the above 
totals. 

The enrollment in the graded Training School in 1914-15 was 200, 
i. e: 

159 Regular Session B. 69 G. 90 

41 Summer session B. 2 2 G. 19 



61 



4. Session 
Classified by Years of Course 

Post Graduates 3 

Seniors 62 

Juniors in Gen. Courses ....67 
Juniors in Certificate Courses 84 
Specials 

in Rural Courses 52 

in Piano Courses 14 

in six weeks courses 2 

in all other courses 14 

Total in Regular Session ...298 
Total in (Joint) Sum- 
mer Session 309 

607 



1915-1916. 

Classified by Course Pursued 

Course A-1 Gen 52 

Course A-2 25 

Course A-3 20 

Other Specialists' Courses 

(A-6, A-7. A_8) 6 

Course A-4 16 

Course A.9 10 

Courses Rural "B" 52 

Other (Jr.) Certificate 

Courses 84 

All other Courses 33 

Total in Regular Session, .. 298 
Total in (Joint) Sum- 
mer Session 309 



607 

The enrollment of the Training Schools is not included in the above 
totals. 

The enrollment in the graded training school in 1915-1916, not 
including the summer training school which registered about 62, was 
150. B. 69. G. 81. 

The five rural training centers enrolled approximately 145 chil- 
dren during 1915-1916. 

5. Session 1916-1917. 

Classified by Course Pursued 
Course A-1 General ... 59 

Course A-2 35 

Course A_3 17 

Other Specialists' Courses 

(A-6, A-7, A-S) 5 

Course A_4 10 

Course A-9 4 

Course A-10 6 

Course Rural "B" . . 32 
Other Junior Certificate 

Courses 143 

All other Courses .... 36 

847 

Number counted twice 19 



Classified by Years of 


Course 


Post Graduates 


2 


Seniors 


87 


Juniors in General 




Courses 


39 


Juniors in Certificate 




Courses 


143 


Specials 




in Rural Courses . . 


32 


in Piano Courses . . 


22 


in six weeks courses 


4 


in all other courses. 


10 



339 

Number counted twice 11 



Actual number enrolled 

in Regular Session 328 

Actual number enrolled 

in Summer Session 263 



Actual number enrolled 

in Regular Session 328 

Actual number enrolled 

in Summer Session 268 



Total for the entire year 591 Total for the entire year 591 

Eight graduates of the School enrolled for work in the 1917 Sum- 
mer School and forty-nine students who attended during the regular 
s'ession remained for the Summer Session. 

The enrollment of the Training Schools is not included in the 
above totals. 



62 



The enrollment In the graded training school in 1916-1917, not 
Including the summer training school which registered 38, was 
126. B. 63. G. 63. 

The four rural training centers enrolled approximately 115 chil- 
dren during 1916-1917. 

The local extension work offered during the year in Canning and 
Physical Education registered approximately 57 people. 



€3 



DIRECTORY OF STUDENTS 
Lewiston State Normal School 
1916-1917. 

Xam© Course Home Address 

Adams, Myrthel A-9-1 Weiser 

Adams, Zella A-2 Jr Weiser 

Akins, Marie Mabel A-2 Sr Lewiston 

Allen, Ethel Pearl A-9-1 Burke 

Amey, Fannie A- 3 Jr. . . Donnybrook, North Dakota 

Anderson, Clara Irene A-1 Jr. Sandpoint 

Anders'on, Pamie M A-9-1 Potlatch 

Armstrong, Marion A-1 Sr St. Maries 

Baken, Theresa A-l Sr Moscow- 
Bangs, Ruth (Mrs. Pearce) . . .A-8 Jr Lewiston 

Baker, W. Roy A-9-1 New Plymouth 

Bandy, Mrs. Mayme B-2 Lewiston 

Beasley, Myrtle Cleo A-9-1 Meridian, R. F. D. No. 2 

Begle, Kittie Alena A-l Sr Lewiston 

Bean, Elsie (Graduate in Man- 
ual Training) A-9-1 Garfield, AVn. 

Bean, Itha J A-2 Jr Garfield, Wn. 

Becker, Mary A-l gr Aberdeen 

Bell, Gladys Lorraine A-9-1 Cambridge 

Belts, Madge A-9 Sr. Clarkston, Wn. 

Benscotter, Pearl Blanche . . . .A-9-1 Palouse, Wn. 

Bicknell, Helen Elizabeth. A-4-2 Caldwell 

Blomstrom, Edith A. A-9-1 . Cambridge 

Blomquist, Florence Myrtle . . .A-l Sr Moscow 

Blayden, Marvel A-9-1 New Plymouth 

Boggs, Esther A-2 Sr Clarkston, Wn. 

Bolstad, Anna A-9-2 Lewiston 

Booher, Mary Vollmer B-1 . . Troy 

Brady, Mary Jane A-9-1 Wallace 

Brandt, Neva A-2 Jr. . Gooding 

Bristol, Mrs. W. H Piano Lewiston 

Broadhead, Maude Lucille . . . .A-9-1 Coeur d'Alene 

Brown, Theresa M A-9-1 Lewiston 

Brown, Aletha A-9-2 Clarkston, Wn. 

Brown, Florence Sp. Piano Clarkston, Wn. 

Euntrork, Lena ]\1 A?, Sr Caldwell 

64 



Name Ooiirse Home Address 

Burns, Lena Beatrice ^ A-2 Jr Lewiston 

Burns. Gladys H B-l Lewiston Orchards 

Bursell. Margaret A A-2 Jr Lewiston 

Bursell, Blanche, graduate in 

Physical Education A-7 Sr. (A-9-1) Lewiston 

Burnside, Mary Frances A-2 Jr Lewiston 

Butler, Vivian Josephine A-6 Sr Lewiston 

Byrnes, Francile A-2 Sr Moscow 

Carlson, Jenny A-9-1 Harrison 

Cay, Nav\'a B-l Moscow 

Campbell, Clara Jessie A-9-1 New Meadows 

Campbell, Stella A-9-1 New Meadows 

Christensen, Mamie Sp. (Univ. Credit) Moscow 

Clare, Louella J A-9-1 Cambridge 

Cleveland, Grace E B-l Summit 

Clifford, Florence A-9-1 Lewiston 

Coldren, Harriette Ellen Sp Clarkston, Wn. 

Covey, Lela A-9-1 Nezperce 

Coffey. Edythe J A-9-1 Pullman, Wn. 

Cope, Lillian A-9-1 Nevada, Mo. 

Cowgill. Clara Edith A-3 Sr Grangevllle 

Coolidge, Ruth A-9-1 Ilo 

Craig, Jean Alan A-9-1 Clarkston, Wn. 

Crackel, Louise B-3 Corvallis, Ore. 

Cronk, Myron P B-l Worley 

Crum, Earl , . . .A-10 Sr Filer 

Davis, Naomi Francelia A-9-2 Ilo 

Day, Lucile A-9-1 New Plymouth 

Davenport, Ethel A-9-1 Kellogg 

Deerkop, Hazel A-1 Sr Palouse, Wn. 

Dickens, Kathleen Ida A-9-1 Caldwell 

Divine, Cornelia Elliott A-l Sr Lewiston 

Dole, Mildred A-l Sr. Lewiston 

Dresser, Jessie Angeline A-3 Jr Lewiston 

Dustan, Laura Sp. Piano Clarkston, Wn. 

Elder, Lucile A-9-2 Coeur d'Alene 

Elliott, Frances Amanda A-9-1 Weiser 

Emmett, Cordelia May A-3 Sr Kendrick 

Erickson, Ruth Sp. Piano Lewiston 

Eaton, Dora B A-2 Sr, Mountain Home 

Ehlert, Dorothea B-l Sweetwater 

Embry, Clay T Sp. (State Certificate) Clarkston, Wn. 

Fisher, Ethel A-2 Sr Blackfoot 

Pitting, Geneva A-9-2 Kooskla 

Flock, Beatrice A-2 Sr Pullman, Wn. 

Fowler, Rosa Elizabeth A-9-1 Nezperce 

65 



Name Course Home Address: 

Poster, Marie Sp. Piano Clarkston, Wn. 

Frizzell, Melva Lorena A-9-1 Troy 

Prye, Ina Grace A-2 Sr Silver City 

Gardner, Helen Louise A-1 Sr Wardner 

Gardner, Kate A-9-2 Soldier 

Gault, Ruby Ellen A-1 Sr Athol 

Goldman, Queen A Sp. Piano Clarkston, Wn. 

Goldsmith, Dorothea G A-9-1 Caldwell 

Green, Edra Thelma A-2 Jr Lewiston 

Green, Mary Deering A-3 Sr Salmon 

Greene, Helen Phoebe A-1 Jr. Lewiston 

Grenolds, Lucile Emily A-9-2 Kendrick 

Grieser, Louise A-9-1 ("6 weeks") Kendrick 

Grosjean, Roxie A-9-1 Kamiah 

Grosso, Agnes Rose A-9-2 Nampa, R. F. D. 2 

Gute, Rose N B-l Cloverland, Wn. 

Haase, Emma Bertha A-i Jr Clarkston, Wn. 

Hagglund, Mamie A-3 Jr. Sp Lewiston 

Hall, Alma Mary A-1 Jr Boise 

Hall, Coral Clarice A-3 Sr Jerome 

Hamill, Hazel A-9 Sr Clarkston, Wn. 

Hanimar, Blanche Victoria . .A-9-i Caldwell, R.F.D. 2 

Haaser, Norma A-1 Sr Lewiston 

Hampton, Minnie Sp. Piano Genesee 

Hanley, Winifred M A-2 Sr Mountain Home 

Hanley, Ruby A-2 Sr Omaha, Nebr. 

Harrell, Leola A-9-1 Cambridge 

Harrell, Elsie B-l Cambridge 

Hedges, Blanche L A-2 Sr Meridian 

Heidrick, Alice B-i Plummer 

Helpman, Ruth Annette A-9-2 Kendrick 

Henkins, Gladys A-1 Sr Lewiston 

Hershberger, Emily Mae A-1 Jr Lewiston 

Hayse, Goldie A-9-1 Weiser 

Heinzman, Ella A-9-1 St. Maries 

Herbert, Mrs. Harry Sp, Piano Lewiston 

Hill, Emma Sp. Piano Clarkston, Wn. 

Hines Elizabeth A-4-2 Pipestone, Minn. 

Holee, Caroline Sybil A-9-1 Port Lapwai 

Hollingsworth, Bertha G A-1 Sr Lewiston 

Hollingsworth, Lila Myrtle A-1 Jr Lewiston 

Holman, Wilma Elsie A-1 Sr. Boise 

Hopkins, June Gertrude A-S-l Sandpoint 

Howard, Florence Mae A-9-2 Glenns Perry 

Hubbard. Thelma W A-9-1 Jobnson, Wta. 

Huse, Esther A-1 Sr Weiser 



Name Course Home Address 

Inghram, Opal Viola A-9-1 R. F. D., Lewiston 

Irwin, Leland S A-9-10 Juliaetta 

Isbell, Hazel Emily A-2 Sr Lewiston 

Isbell, Pearl Alodia A-l Sr Lewiston 

Iverson, Ellen A-9-1 Moscow, R. F. D. 1 

Jacobs, Louise Clair A-l Jr. Lewiston 

Jones, Rebecca A-^-2 Gooding 

Jones, Marguerite Sp. Piano Lewiston 

Johnson, Amy (withdrew) . . . .A-l Jr Lewiston Orchards 

Johnson, Elizabeth Sp. Piano Clarkston, Wn. 

Jewell, lone A-9-1 Nevada, Mo. 

Jordan, Banner Eugene B-1 Juliaetta 

Jordan, Anna Laura B-1 Juliaetta 

Joyce, Marv F/orence A-9-1 Sandpoint 

Karow, Rosetta Elizabeth . . . .A-2 Sr. . .2234 iSl Sawyer Av., Chicago 

Keeney, Laura Alm^da A-9-1 Troy 

IKeeney, Lynne A-9 Sr Troy 

Keren, Margaret B. . > . . , A-9-1 Maiden, "Win. 

Kettenbach, Sallie Mary (Mrs. 

Baskett) A-l Jr Lewiston 

Kellner, Esther M A-9-2 Coeur d'Alene 

OKidwell, Mary A-9-1 Garfield, Wn. 

King, Robert Earle A-9-1 Asotin, Wn. 

Kroessin, Rose Marie Sp. Piano Ontario, Ore. 

Lathrop, Anah Beatrice A-9-1 Emmett, R. F. D. 1 

Langdon, Pearl A-9 Sr. Lewiston 

Leeper, Louise M A-3 Jr Lewiston 

Lehfeldt, Ella Holda A-9-1 Asotin, Wn. 

Lewis, Ethel Magdalene A-l Jr Salmon 

LeQuime, Aida Sp. Piano Lewiston 

Libert, Mildred E. (graduate in 

Home Economics) A-l Sr Lewiston 

Lieb, Mercedes A-9-1 Palouse, Wn., R. P. D. 3 

Litch, Eva A-9-1 Moscow 

Lockwood, Charlotte A-9-2 Meridian 

Lynch, Joseph H A-10 Sr Bonners Ferry 

Loeffler, Elizabeth Sp-B Lewiston 

Lommasson, Helen A-9-1 .Clarkston, Wash. 

Ley, Maude Evelyn A-9-1 Lewiston 

Loseth, Delia A-9-1 Orofino 

Lewis, Earl C A-9-1 Weippe 

Mammen, Bessie A-l Jr Parma 

Mammen, Bonnie A-9_2 Parma 

Mason, Iva M A-9-1 Post Falls 

Mason, Maude M A-2 Jr New Plymouth 

Martin, Marie Ada A-9-2 Coeur d'Alene 

67 



Name Course Home Address 

Manring, May M A-9-1 Grangeville 

Masters, Aaron A-9-10 Harrison 

Mathews, Adda . A-3 Jr. (provisional) Genesee 

McCormack, Kathryn B A-1 Sr Lewiston 

McCullough, Margaret E A-1 Sr Fraser 

McCann, Mabel Sp. Piano Lewiston 

McDevitt, May H A-9-1 Burke 

McDonald, Edna A-9-1 Cottonwood 

McGrath, Gladys L A-1 Jr. Lewiston 

McGuike, Alta B-1 Caldwell R. F. D. 2 

McHugh, Norrine A-3 Jr. 327 E. BooneAv., Spokane,W!n. 

Mclntire, Stella Irene A-9-1 Sweetwater 

McKeown, Daphne A-9-2 Payette 

McKinnon, Precious Pearl . . . .A-2 Jr Lewiston 

McSparran, Gertrude Elizabeth. A-9-1 Meridian 

Meredith, Gladys Kathryn . . . .A-9-2 Lewiston 

Merritt, Dorothy A-2 Sr Caldwell 

Meyer, May E A-3 Sr Weiser 

Michalson, Margery Jeanette . .A-9-1 Moscow 

McPeak, Betty J A-1 Jr Clarkston, Wn. 

Minden, 'Edlna Sp. Piano Clarkston, Wn. 

Middleton, Ada Ena A-9-1 Nampa 

Miller, Lodiska A-9-1 New Plymouth 

Miner, Eva Lee A-9-1 Boise 

Mitchell, Pearl B-1 Council 

Moore, Grace Emma A-2 Sr. Farmington 

*Moore, Mabel . A-9-Sr St. Anthony 

Morlan, Mable Angeline A-1 Sr Lewiston 

Morscheck, George W. ....... .A-1 Sr Genesee 

Moe, Jessie Katherine A-9-1 Kellogg 

Morris, Lucile Sp. Piano Lewiston 

Morrow, Arta (withdrew) . . . .A-9-1 Lewiston 

Morrow, Burwell B-1 Lewiston 

Murphy, Mary Irene A-9-2 Coeur d'Alene 

Musser, Gail Frances A-2 Jr Filer 

Musser, Mary Helen A-9-1 Filer 

Mushlitz, Eugene A-10 Sr Troy 

Myers, C, Maurice A-10 Jr Corvallis 

Nelson, Flora Ellen A-9-2 ^ Gifford 

Nibler, Gladys Florence A-9-1 Boise, R. F. D. 2 

Nolen, Inez B-1 Culdesac 

Noyes, Gertrude A-9-2 Heppner, Ore. 

O'Connor, Irene A-1 Sr Lewiston 

.'Oisborne, Alice Ladena A-9-2 Filer 



-Decea.sed. 

68 



I 



Name Coiirso Home Address 

Papendick. Elise G A-1 Sr. Rathdrum 

Parker, Sylvia Augusta A-3 Sr. Grangeville 

Peacock, Fannie H A-9-1 Payette 

Pearce, Florence A-4-2 Lewiston 

Pearson, Anna Catherine A-9 Sr New Plymouth 

Pearson, Helen A-9-2 New Plymouth 

Pederson. Florence A-9-2 Potlatch 

Pederson, Ruth Alice A-9-1 Potlatch 

Peoples, Edna G Sp Kellogg 

Peters, Edith Rose A-9-1 Post Falls 

Peters, Jennie B-1 Joseph 

Peterson, Rosalia Pauline . . . .A-9-1 Broten 

Peterson, Segne Beatrice B-l Clarkston, Wn. 

Phipps, Laura Bell A-9-1 Genesee 

Pilgerrim, Marie Rose A-4-1 Twin Falls 

Pierstorff , Nola Sp. B. West Lake 

Pollard, Gladys A-9-2 Weiser 

Poole, Maude Augusta A-2 Jr Boise 

Potter, True A-9-1 Nampa 

Powell, Blanche L A-1 Jr Kendrick 

Portz, Angela A-9-1 Uniontown, Wn. 

Price, Nell Ward A-1 Sr Lewiston 

Quilliam, Mona Sp. Piano Lewiston 

Ramey, Geraldine Lois A-9-1 Nezperce 

Randall, Edris E. W A-1 Jr Lewiston 

Remer, Hazel Geneva A-1 Sr Lewiston 

Rice, Frances Adeline A-4-1 Caldwell 

Rice, Frances Sophronia A-9-1 Gifford 

Riddell, Frances A-9-1 Fruitvale 

Riley, Gladys F A-1 Sr. . Westlake 

Riley, Ruth C= Sp. B Clarkston, Wn. 

Roberts, Nell Jeanette A-9-1 Nezperce 

Robertson Berdena A-9-1 Coeur d'Alene 

Robinson, Eleanor Alice A-1 Sr Lewiston 

Robinson, Sophia Ann A-1 Sr Brookins 

Roe, Roxie May A-9-1 Nezperce 

Rogers, E. Mariah B-l Stites 

Rognstad, Amy Myrtle A-9-1 Kendrick 

Roup, Mirs. Geo. W B-l Cloverland, Wn, 

Roup Geo. W A-4-10 Cloverland, Wn. 

Roup, J. Lester A-10 Sr Lewiston 

Ross, Margaret A A-2 Sr Mountain Home 

Rowe, Myrtle B-l Grand View 

Royston, Clara Mae A-9-1 Payette, R. F. D. 

Ryan, Jean A A-8 Sr Chelan, Wn. 

Ryan, Mary Louise A-9-1 Weiser, R. F. D. 1 

69 



Xame Course Home Address 

Sanford, Josephine A-9-1 Post Falls 

Sartain, Arvile Jamea A-9-10 Juliaetta 

Satoris, Harlene A-9-1 Payette 

Schilling, Mabel B A-9-2 Post Falls 

Senft, Blanche Mary A-9-1 Sandpoint 

Shamberger, Jane B A-9-1 Payette 

Shearer, Virginia F Sp. (Univ. credit) . Lewiston 

Shefler, Gladys A-9-1 St. Maries 

Sheridan, Avice Clara A-9-1 Boise 

Shafer, Henrietta Dorothy A-2 Jr Boise 

Simpson, Edith E A-l Sr Clarkston, Wn. 

Sims, Marion Prances A-3 Sr Lewiston 

Small, Fern G Sp. Library Lewsiton 

Smith, Gordon A-9-1 Caldwell 

Smith, Laura Lorene A-i Sr Clarkston, Wn. 

Smith, Theodora A-9-1 ("6 weeks") Moscow R. F, D. 2 

Snyder, Raymond Sp. (Univ. credit) Lewiston 

Solberg, Mollie Louise A-9-1 Sandpoint 

Sorenson, Ora M .A-9-1 Nezperce 

Soule, Gertrude Ella A-2 Jr Salmon 

Southwick, Goldie B-1 Lenore 

Southwick. Viola B-1 Lenore 

Strode, Willis B-2 Peck 

Soreau, Esther B-1 Grangeville 

Staff, Alfreida Elemena A-9-1 Troy, R. F. D. 3 

Stanford, Kathryn Elaine A-4-1 Nampa 

Stevens, Violet A-4-2 Mountain Home 

Stewart, Lillian Norma A-l Jr, Clarkston, Win. 

Stone, Gertrude, Emma A-9-1 Lewiston 

Stone, Minnie Christiana A-3 Sr Rosalia, Wn. 

Swedland, Fretha A-l Sr Potlatch 

Swisher, Nema Margory A-l Jr Lewiston 

Tappan, Grace Evelyn A-9-1 Emmett 

Taylor, Hannah Mahola A-3 Sr Preston, R. F. D. 3 

Taylor, Nance Loretta A-9-1 Lewiston 

Thomas, Elsie B-1 Kendrick 

Tupker, Hilda Blanche A-9-1 Genesee 

Turner, Mary E B-1 Kooskia 

Tweedy, Ida M Sp. Piano Clarkston, Wn. 

Vogleson, Mae Belle Jose A-l Jr Lewiston 

Volkel. Mervil A-l Jr Post Falls 

Vesser, Jean A-9-1 , Coeur d'Alene 

Uhri, Gertrude A-9-1 Glenwood 

Waldahl, Nellis O A-9-1 1506 Resseguie, Boise 

Wallace. Ruth A-2 Jr Waha 

WebHtnr. Florence D A-2 Sr Clarkston, Wn. 

70 



Name Course Home Address 

U'ellman, Helen Gladys A-8 Sr Orofino 

Wells, Golda Lois A-9-1 Payette, R. F. D. 

Wells, Marie B-1 Dietrich 

W^elsh, Albert E Sp. (State certificate) . . . .Lewiston 

Wenz, Frences Mae A-4-1 Rathdrum 

W'hittaker, Anne Campbell . . . .Sp Clarkston, Wn. 

Williams, Madge Sp. Piano Lewiston 

Williamson, Lyman Vassar . . . .A-10 Sr Lewiston 

Willis, Clarissa Sp. Piano Lenore 

Wilson, Eleanor Margaret . . . .A-4-1 St. Marie? 

Wiswell, Mildred A-9-1 Deary 

Wood, Frances E A-9-1 Weiser 

Woesner, Inez Estelle A-1 Sr Boise 

Wyatt, Ella Elma B-1 Lewiston 

Wyatt, Florence Elsie Sp. Piano Lewiston 

Wyman, Thelma 'A-9-1 Culdesac 

Wyant, Ruby A-9-1 ("6 weeks") Salmon 

Wright, Anna E Sp. (Univ. credit) Troy 

Young, Helen A-8 Sr Lewiston 

Yount, Norma A-3 Sr Clarkston, Wn. 

Yount, Frances Sp. Piano Clarkston, Wn. 

York, Vanda M A-9-1 ("6 weeks") Kamiah 



Directory of Students of the Summer Session 



Peryl Acker Coeur d'Alene 

CJorda Acton Coeur d'Alene 

Marie Aldridge . . Bonners Ferry 

Edyth Allen Sandpoint 

Fannie Amey Sandpoint 

Freeda Anderson, Gulps Landing 
Hildur Anderson, Gulps Landing 
Byrd M. Ault . . Enterprise, Ore. 

Olga Axelson Lewiston 

Margaret Baillee Coeur d'Alene 

William Roy Baker 

New Plymouth 

Edna Ball Peck 

Ruth Ball Peck 

Mary Becker Aberdeen 

Wayne Beloit Giff ord 

Madge Belts. . . . Clarkston, Wn. 

Ella Bishop Coeur d'Alene 

Minnie Blake Orofino 

Cora Blanchard Troy 

Esther Boggs. . Clarkston, Wn. 
Grace Bohrer Weiser 



Ada Bower Avon 

Lora Brackett ...... .Lookoat 

Evelyn Brennan, Coeur d'Alene 

Mary Brown ... Kell i^g 

Myra Brown Moscow 

Roma Broyles.... Maiden, Wn. 
Lyda Bruneau Mountain Home 

Bertha Buchanan 

New London, Minn. 

Ethel Bunde Sanlpoint 

Blanche Burns Lewiston 

Gladys Burns Lewiston 

Lena Burns Lewiston 

Clara Campbell . . New Meadows 
Stella Campbell . . New Meadows 

Helen Cupps Tekoa, Wn. 

Katherine Carey Athol 

Mabel Carlson Leadore 

Myrtle Games, French Lick, Ind. 
Mabel Carscallen, Coeur d'Alene 
Lila Chariton . .Coeur d'Alene 
Beulah Clifford Pearl 



71 



Marguerite Collins, Butte, Mont. 

Edith Compton Kendrick 

Lelia Connors. . .Coeur d'Alene 

Ellen dook Juliaetta 

Nina Cook Emmett 

Lois Coolidge Ho 

Ruth Coolidge Ho 

Cjlara Cramer . . . .Cottonwood 

Bessie Curran Naples 

Jess W. Curtis Nezperce 

Kathrj^n Curtiss Reubens 

Ruby Curts, Walla Walla, Wn. 
Irene Danforth. . . .Priest River 
Dorothy Dayton Coeur d'Alene 
Helen Dobner . . . .Grangeville 

Mildred Dole Lewiston 

Florence Dowling 

Spokane, Wn. 

Geneva Dreskell Cataldo 

Mildred Dunning 

Bonners Ferry 

Mabel Dryden Peck 

Edna Eckersley . . .Winchester 

Beulah Eckles Cambridge 

Mark Egbers St. Joe 

Dorothy Ehlert . . . Sweetwater 

Cleo Engle Kooskia 

Alice Erskine Grangeville 

Lillian Ferguson ....(... .Deary 

Lottie Foster Webb 

Mabel Garvey Kellogg 

Genevieve Gesellchen . . Genesee 
Clara Gilbertson, Coeur d'Alene 

Eff ie Glass Emmett 

Dela Glassco Kuna 

Eva Good . . . .Marysville, Wn. 

Lena Gordon Sandpoint 

Gertrude Graebner . . . G,iff ord 
Raymond Guerrettaz 

Uniontown, Wn, 

Rose Gute .... Cloverland.Wn. 

Saul Haas New York 

Norma Haaser Lewiston 

Mamie Hagglund . . . .Lewiston 

Etta Hall Coeur d'Alene 

Hilda Halverson. .Anatone, Wn. 

Mabel Halvorson Moscow 

Maud Hanners ..Coeur d'Alene 

Inga Hanson Avon 

Myrtle Heberling Naples 

Ella Helnzmann . . . .Lewiston 
Fay Henson Kamlah 



Alice Hoban .... Spokane, Wn. 

Christian Hoff Leland 

Evern Holden Peck 

Thelma Hubbard Pullman 

India Huelsiep Dudley 

Leland Irwin Juliaetta 

Carrie Isbell Lewiston 

Jennie Jacks Lewiston 

Esther Johnson Troy 

Vera Jones . . . .Bonners Ferry 
Oscar R. Jordan .... Lewiston 
Anna Kellner. . .Coeur d'Alene 
Esther Kellner . .Coeur d'Alene 

Pearl Kitch Troy 

Lelia Knight Weiser 

Mary Knowles Peck 

Grace Larkin Orof ino 

Maybelle Larkin Orof ino 

Zella Laymaster Weiser 

Ethel Lewis Salmon 

Dorothy Lollar . .Spokane, Wn. 
Helen Lommasson 

Clarkston, Wn. 

Georgia Loughney 

Bonners Ferry 

Ruth Lozier . . . Bonners Ferry 

Nannie Lyle Peck 

Lucette Lytle Grangeville 

Ruth McConaughey . . . Gif f ord 
Isabel McCormick . . Spirit Lake 
Margaret McCullough . .Fraser 
Lucille McDuffie ...Sandpoint 
Mary McEntee .... Grangeville 
Marie McFadden . . . .Southwick 

Jesse McGhee Leland 

Gladys McGrath Lewiston 

Vida McKern Juliaetta 

Precious McKinnon . .Lewiston 

Marion McLeod Kamiah 

Betty McPeak . . Clarkston, Wn. 
Veva Malone . . Clarkston, Wn. 

May Manring Grangeville 

Honor Merrill Lewiston 

Cfharlotte Miller . . Black Lake 

Ruth Miller Grangeville 

Mildred MJisner Melrose 

Ruby Moe Medimont 

Pauline Mohr ..Coeur d'Alene 

Lauro Monroe Orofino 

Georgia Mooney Coeur d'Alene 
Hazel Moore .... Bonners Ferry 
Louizette Moore Bonners Ferry 



72 



Mabel Moore (deceased) .... 

St. Anthony 

Evangeline Neil Oreana 

Virginia Neil Oreana 

Genevieve Nelson . . . .Nezperce 
Mabel Nettleingham . . Sandpoint 

Vallie Noble Orofino 

Ray Nolan Garfield, Wn. 

Lorain Norway St. Maries 

Elvina Nylander Coeur d'Alene 
Esther Nylander Coeur d'Alene 
Teresa O'Brien. .Bonners Ferry 

Alma O'Hara Orofino 

Verl Oliver Orofino 

Oliver Ostrander . . . .Lewiston 

Violet Packer Harrison 

Elise Papendick, . . . . Rathdrum 

Alice Patton De Smet 

Arlie Payne . . . .Coeur d'Alene 

Florence Pearce Lewiston 

Anna Pearson . .New Plymouth 

Rupert Peck Clearwater 

Florence Pederson . . -Potlatch 

Mar\' Pentland Granite 

Grace Perry. .Farmington, Wn. 
Ludy Peterson . . . .Idaho Falls 

Arlina Picket Lewiston 

Nellie Pierce Jerome 

Nola Pierstorff Lewiston 

Maude Poole Boise 

Angela Portz. .Uniontown, Wn. 

Lennis Pullen Stites 

Geneva Randall Lewiston 

Lena Reader Harrison 

Nellie Reed Webb^ 

Elizabeth Remo ....Sandpoint 

Lois Ramey Nezperce 

Blanche Rapp .... Grangeville 

Adah Ratliff Nezperce 

Frances S. Rice Gifford 

Hazel Rice CJoeur d'Alene 

Lilly Roberson Orofino 

Berdena Robertson 

Onalasa, Wn. 

Mabel Robertson .... Cascade 

Lucia Rodius Cascade 

Ida Rogers Stites 

Lucia Rosenranz Gifford 

Margaret Ross. . Mountainhome 

George Roup 

Cloverland, Wn. 



Mrs. George Roup 

Cloverland, Wn. 

Frances Ruch Kellogg 

Luella Ruen Sandpoint 

Bertha Rushing Rathdrum 

Nora Saling Weippe 

Lucia Sanderson New Plymouth 

Emma Schmidt Plummer 

Florence Schultz Salmon 

Rose Schultz St. Maries 

Avice Sheridan Boise 

Esther Sibert Garfield, Wn. 

Marion Sims Lewiston 

Maude Sloan Grangeville 

Laura Small Orofino 

Mrs. Fred Smith ....Lewiston 
Lillian Stewart. .Clarkston, Wn. 
Edna Stoddard .... Rathdrum 

Inice Stoddard Rathdrum 

Nina Stoddard Rathdrum 

Minnie Stone .... Rosalia, Wn. 

Mabel Storholt Orofino 

Grace Stuckey .... Grangeville 

Anna Sundstrum Troy 

Eleanor Suppiger .... Caldwell 
Georgiana Suppiger . .Caldwell 
Lydia Swatman ....Ferdinand 
Mabel Sweeney .... St. Maries 

Sarah Sweeney Genesee 

Lee Taylor Sandpoint 

C. D. Thaxton Copeland 

Cora Thompson ...Grangeville 

Marie Tiggelbeck 

Spokane, Wn. 

Alice Tobin Genesee 

Violet Van Vleck 

Coeur d'Alene 

Pearl Vaughn Leona 

Mervil Volkel Post Falls 

Verna Walser Worley 

Agnes Warlick Peck 

Florence Weed St. Maries 

Albert Welsh Lewiston 

Alice West Peck 

Daisy White Orofino 

Jennie White Edgemere 

Lena Whitmore Moscow 

Clarissa Willis Lenore 

Mrs. Anna Wilson .... Moscow 

Metta Wilson Pullman, Wn. 

Sarah Wilson ..Clarkston, Wn. 



78 



Elda Wright St. Maries 

Hazel Wright St. Maries 

Helen Wrighter Jiewiston 

Frances Wood Weiser 

Aaron Wyne New York 

M. Veronica Yearout . . Sebesta 
Norma Yount . . Clarkston, Wn. 
Helen Young . . . .Tacoma, Wn. 

Lietha Aiken Orof ino 

Lillian Balgeman .... Vale, Ore. 
Carl M. Benson . . . .Sandpoint 

Clarabel Coontz MuUan 

T. Floyd Dryden Peck 



Emma Griffin Ford 

Jo W. Guy Kendrick 

Fred K. Haase . . Clarkston, Wn. 

Alicia Keeley Sandpoint 

Alta Pratt Lewiston 

Joseph Passoneau 

Pullman, Wn. 

Miriam Phillips . Clarkston, Wn. 

Lena Satterlee Sandpoint 

Esther Volgt Spokane, Wn. 

Satie Wahl Gif ford 

Janette Wood St. Maries 



74 



Publications of Lewiston State Normal School 



BULLETINS. 



Catalog, 1896-1897. (Out of print). 
Catalog, 1896-1897. (Out of print.) 
Circular of Information, 1903-190. (Out of print.') 
Biennial Report, 1902-190. (Out of print.) 
Catalog, 1904-1905. (Out of print.) 
Vol. 1, No.l. Catalog, 1905-1906. (Out of print.) 
Vol. 1, No. 2. Bulletin, 1905. (Out of print.) 

Bulletin, January to March, 1916 (Out of print.) 
Manual Training, Nature Study, and Announcements. 

August, 1907. (Out of print.) 
Biennial Report. 1904-1906. 

History in the Grades. March, 1907. (Out of print.) 
Catalog. June, 1907. 

Legislative Enactments, 1893-1907. November, 1907. 
Civics In the Grades March, 1908. (Out of print.) 
Supplementary Catalog Number. June, 1908. 
Biennial Report, 1906-1908. December, 1908. 
Catalog. 1909. 

Bulletin. April, 1910. (Out of print.) 
Some Library Aids for Teachers. September, 1910. 

(Out of print.) 
Biennial Report. 1908-1910. 

School Libraries. Fe^^ruary, 1911. (Out of print.) 
General Information April, 1911. (Out of print.) 
The Preparation of Teachers for Elementary Schools. 
Courses for the Preparation of Teachers in Subjects 
Other Than Those Purely Professional in Charac- 
ter. (Out of print.) 
School Libraries. (Revised). April, 1912. 
Rural School Book List. April. 1912. (Out of print.) 
Announcement of Department of Home Economics. 

June, 1912. 
List of Books for Public Schools. (Out of print.) See 

State Board Bulletins, Vol. 3, No. 3. 
General Catalog June, 1913 (Out of print) 
Announcement of Rural Department. August, 1913. 
Seat Work for Rural Schools. November, 1913. (Out 

of print) See Vol 11, No. 1. 
Social Activities for Rural Schools. February, 1914. 
Biennial Report. 1913-1914. (Out of print.) 
Oral English. February, 1915. 
General Catalog July, 1915. (Out of print.) 
May Festival. Mlarch, 1916. (Out of print.) See 

Vol. 10. No. 2. 
Course of Study for the Training School. May, 1916. 
General Catalog. August, 1916. (Out of print). 
Biennial Report 1915-1916. 

May Festival. Revised Reprint of Vol. 9, No. 2. 
Announcement of the 1917 Summer Session. May, 1917. 
General Catalog. August, 1917. 

Occupational Seat Work for Rural Schools. Revised 
edition of Vol. 8, No. 1. 
Any of the above publications will be sent free upon request, ex- 

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4, 


No. 


3. 


Vol. 


4, 


No. 


4. 


Vol. 


5, 


No. 


1. 


Vol. 


5, 


No. 


1. 


Vol. 


5, 


No. 


3. 


Vol. 


5, 


No. 


4. 


Vol. 


6. 


No. 


1. 


Vol. 


6, 


No. 


2. 


Vol. 


6, 


No. 


3. 


Vol. 


^. 


No. 


3. 


Vol. 


7, 


No. 


3. 


Vol. 


7, 


No. 


4. 


Vol. 


8. 


No. 


1. 


Vol. 


8, 


No. 


2. 


Vol. 


8, 


No. 


3. 


Vol. 


8, 


No. 


4. 


Vol. 


9. 


No. 


1. 


Vol. 


9. 


No. 


2. 


Vol. 


9, 


No. 


3. 


Vol. 


9, 


No. 


4. 


Vol. 


10 


, No. 


1. 


Vol. 


10 


No. 


2. 


Vol. 


10 


, No. 


3. 


Vol. 


10 


, No. 


4. 


Vol. 


11 


, No. 


1. 



cepting in cases where the bulletin is to be used as a text, i. e., for 
class use or in preparing for an examination. 

The price of "School Libraries" is 15c. All other bulletins, 10c 

each. ^ — 

Idaho Rural Teacher's Monitor — Published monthly thruout the regu- 
lar session. 

BUIiliETINS ISSUED BY THE STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

Vol. 2, No. 1. Handbook for Rural Teachers. 

"Vol. 2, No. 2. State Educational Institutions. 

Vol. 2, No. 4. Outline for the Study of the History of Idaho. 

Vol. 3, No. 3. List of Books for Elementary and Rural Schools. 

Requests for these bulletins should be addresesed to the State 
Department of Education, Boise, Idaho. 



76 



Application for admission to the IJewiston State Normal School 

To be sent to the Recorder at least two weeks before the day for Enrollm 

Name Date of Birth 

Home Address 







Prepared at 


Graduated 


Graduated 


Admission Record 

SUBJECTS 


'1 




M 


1 


Admission Record 

SUBJECTS 


2^ 


1^ 






HIGH SCHOOL RECORD 


Use this space and the reverse 
necessary, for record of work con 
in normal schools, summer schoo 






















leges and universities. 












1 


1 




































































































































— - 




— - 


— - 




























.... 






























































































.... 












































Total Academic Professiona 


1 


Total Academic Profeas?ioTini 


♦Passing- Mark*> 


Meai 


Tino- nf 


*Passing Mark ? 


A/Too -n 


other marks 




other marks 


Signed 


Signed 


Official position 


Official position 



(To be filled out by the student named above.) 
Name of Course chosen (See pp. 34-39). 
Date on which you expect to enroll 191 



w 

>Iume XI 



AUGUST, 1918 



Number 3 



§tat? Normal S>rl|00l 
lulbtin 



Published Quarterly by the Lewlston State Normal School at 
Lewiston, Idaho. 



General Catalog 



^.C 






'P' 



Sntered as second-class matter, August 5, 1905, at the Postofflce at 
Lewlston, Idaho, under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. 



Volume XI AUGUST, 1918 Number 3 






Published Quarterly by the Lewlston State Normal School at 
Lewiston, Idaho. 



General Catalog 



Entered as second-class matter, August 5, 1905, at the Postofflce at 
Lewiston, Idaho, under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. 



INDEX 



Accommodations for Students and Expenses 16 

Administrative Staff 5 

Admission Requirements 27 

Answers to Questions 14 

Appointment Committee 2rf 

Bulletins Issued by the State Board of Education 71 

Calendar of Months 6 

Certificate of High School Standing 73 

Cost of Board and Room 19 

Courses by Departments: 

Agriculture 43 

Education 45 

English 47 

Fine and Applied Arts 48 

Geography 49 

Health 59 

History and Civics 50 

Home Economics 52 

Library Department 53 

Mathematics 53 

Public School Music and Piano 54 

Penmanship 55 

Physical Education 55 

Primary Department 57 

Science 58 

Courses of Instruction 36 

Directory of Students 63 

Diplomas and Certificates 31 

Expense Estimated for a Year 19 

Extension Work 21 

Faculty List 8 

General Information 11 

Lewis Hall 16 

Outside Accommodations 18 

Piano and Voice Lessons 15 

Publications of Lewiston State Normal School '70 

Railroad Service 20 

School Calendar, 1918-1919 6 

School Libraries 22 

School Publications 12 

State Board of Education 3 

State Educational Institutions 4 

Student Organizations 12 

Student's Outfit 1^ 



Student Aid 



20 



Summary of Admission Requireinonts 30 

Summary of Attendance since 1912 59 

The Training Schools 33 

War Activities Courses 25 

What to Do When You Reach Lewiston 13 



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

and 
BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO 



Evan Evans, President Grangeville 

Ramsey M. Walker, Vice President Wallace 

J. A. Keefer, Secretary Shoshone 

J. A. Llppincott Idaho City 

William Healy Boise 

Ethel E. Redfleld, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, 

Ex-Officio Members Boise 

Enoch A. Bryan, Commissioner of Education Boise 

Austin C. Price, Business Agent Boise 



Executive Committee of The State Board of Education 
for the Lewiston State Normal School 

Evan Evans, Chairman. 

Enoch A. Bryan, Commissioner of Education. 

Oliver M. Elliott, President of the Lewiston State Normal School. 



state Educational Institutions. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO, at Moscow, including Colleges of 
Letters and Sciences, Engineering, (including Mining), Agri- 
culture and Law. 

THE STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS, at Lewiston and Albion, for the 
training of teachers. 

THE IDAHO TECHNICAL INSTITUTE, at Pocatello, a school giving 
vocational, scientific, literary and technical work of a grade 
covered by the first tMO years of college courses and such 
secondary school as the needs of the state demand. 

THE INDUSTRIAL TRAINING SCHOOL, at St. Anthony; a horn© 
and school for boys and girls who in the judgment of the 
Juvenile Court need special care and discipline. 

DEAF AND BLIND SCHOOL, at Gooding. 



Information concerning any of the above institutions may be ob- 
tained from the institution or from the State Board of Education 
at Boise. 



Administrative Staff. 



Oliver M. Elliott, President. 

Francis E. Millay, Dean of the Rural Department and Recorder. 

Bernice McCoy, Dean of Women. 

Edith M. Peckham, Executive Secretary. 

June Faulkner, Financial Secretary and Accountant. 

Frances E. Rich, Recording Secretary. 

Ora L. Kennedy, Matron of Lewis Hall. 

In the absence of the President, Francis E. Millay, Dean of the 
Rural Department and Recorder, is his official representative. 

The heads of the departments are directly responsible to the presi- 
dent for the details of administration within thir respective depart- 
ments. 

Mr. Frances E. Millay is in charge of the Extension work offered 
for teachers-in-service who are desirous of self-improvement in a 
professional way but who are unable to take work in residence. Cor- 
respondence courses are not as yet on a final credit basis. Requests 
for further information concerning extension work should be addressed 
to Mr. Frances E. Millay. (See page 21 for details of this work). 

All General Inquiries and requests should be addressed to the 
President or the Executive Secretary. 



1918 CALENDAR 1918 


JULY 


AUGUST 1 


SEPTEMBER 


S|M|TiW|TiF|S 


S|M|T|W| 


T|F| S|| 


S|M|T|W|T|F|S 


11 21 31 41 5 


6 


j 






1 


2 


3 


1| 21 31 


4 


5 


61 7 1 


7 


8 


9 10 


11 12 


13 


4 


5 6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


8 


9 10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


14 


15 


16 17 


18 19 


201 


11 


12 13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


15 


16 17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


21 


22 


23 24 


25 26 


27 


18 


19 20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


22 


23 24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


28 


29 


30 31 






25 


26 27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


291301 1 1 








OCTOBER 1 


NOVEMBER | 


DECEMBER I 


S|M T|W|T|F 


^ 


S|M|T|W 


T| 


F| S| 


SiM 


T 


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FjS 1 


1 11 21 31 4 


5 


1 1 




1 


2 


11 2 3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


6 


V 


8 


9 


10 11 


12! 


3 


4 5 6 


7 


8 


y 


8| 9 10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 18 


191 


10 


11 12 13 


14 


15 


16 


15 16 17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 25 


26, 


17 


18 19 20 


21 


22 


23 


22 23|24 


25 


2fi 


27 


28 


27 


28 29 


30 


31 


1 


24 


25 26 27 


28 


29 


30 


29|30|31( 








1919 CALENDAR 1919 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


S M|T|W|T|F| S 


S M|T 


W| T 


b' S 


S |M| T|W| T|F| S 






1 


2 


3 


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1 












1 


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9 


10 


11 


2 


3 


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5 


6 


7 


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2 


3 


4 5 


6 


7 


8 


12 


13 


14 15 


16 


17 


18 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


9 


10 


11 12 


13 


14 


15 


19 


20 


21 22 


23 


24 


25 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


16 


17 


18 19 


20 


21 


22 


26 


27 


28 29 


30 


31 




23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 




23 


24 


25 26 


27 


28 


29 


1 1 .1.1 




, 


! 1 1 








30 


31 










APRIL. 


MAY 


JUNE 1 


S|M 


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F S 


S|M| T 


W 


T 


F|S 


SiM 


T|W|T 


F 


S 


1 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 










1 


2 3 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 11 


12 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 10 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


13 


14il5 


16 


17 18 


19 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 17 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 25 


26 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 24 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


27 


28 


29 


30 






25|26|27 


28 


29 


30 31 


29 


30 












^ 


ULY 


AI 


J^"UST 


SEPTEMBER | 


S |M 1 T|W| T| F| S 


S |M 1 T 


W| T| F| S 


S |M 1 T|W| T| F 


s 




1 


2 


3 


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1 


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:j 


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5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


7! 8 9 10 


11 


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13 


13 14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


14|15 16 17 


18 


19 


20 


20 21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


21|22 23 24 


25 


26 


27 


27 28 


29 


30 


31 






24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


28|29|30 1 1 1 
II III 


OCTOBER 


NOVEM 


Bi 


]R 


DECEMBER 


S|M|T|W 


T|F| S 


S |M 1 T|W| T 


F|S 


S M 
1 


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4 


F S 








1 


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•j 


4 


1 










1 


2 


3 


5 


6 


5 


6 




8 


9 


10 


11 


2 3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


7 S 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


1? 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


9 10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


14 15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


in 


?,0 


?A 


V^ 


23 


24 


35 


16 17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


21 22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




23 24 


25 


26127 


28 


29 


28 29 


130 


31 




















L_ 


301 1 


1 1 




I i 











School Calendar 1918-1919 

First Quarter 

I'.egJstration Monday, September 16, 191S 

Training Scliool Opens Tuesday, September 17, 1918 

Class Work Begins Tuesday, September 17, 1918 

First Quarter Closes Friday, November 15, 1918 

Second Quarter 

Second Quarter Begins Monday, November 18, 1918 

Thanksgiving Holidays .... Thursday and Friday, Nov. 28 and 29, 1918 

Christmas Holidays Begin Friday, December 20, 1918 

Exercises Resumed Monday, January 6, 1919 

First Semester Closes Friday, January 31, 1919 

Third Quarter 

Second Semester Begins Monday, February 3, 1919 

Third Quarter Closes Friday, April 4, 1919 

Fourth Quarter 

Fourth Quarter Begins Monday, April 7, 1919 

Spring Vacation .... The days of the Inland Empire Teacher's Ass'n, 

Exercises resumed the following Monday. 

Training School Closes Thursday, May 29, 1919 

Annual Field Day Saturday, May 31, 1919 

Commencement Exercises . . . .Sunday, June 1 to Friday, June 6, 1919 
Fourth Quarter Closes Friday, June 6, 1919 

Summer Quarter, 1919 

Summer Quarter Begins Tuesday, June 10, 1919 

Summer Quarter Closes Friday, August 8, 1919 

"Six-weeks Term" Closes Friday, July 25, 1919 

Independence Day Friday, July 4, 1919 

In addition to the Summer Session, one quarter's work will be 
offered for those desiring Third and Second Grade Normal School 
Certificates. The work offered for these certificates is approximately 
the same as that required for Third and Second Grade County Cer- 
tificates, so that students desiring these latter certificates may take 
the courses at the same time. 



Faculty for 1918-1919 



Oliver M. Elliott, President Educatlom 

A. B., Marietta College; A. M. University of Iowa. 

Bernice McCoy Dean of Women 

Graduate, Lewiston State Normal School; Graduate Student, 
Teachers' College, Columbia University. 

Francis E. Millay Dean of Rural Education and Recorder 

Graduate S. N. S., Cheney, Washington; A. B., and M. A. 
University of Washington. 

Martha Birkeland 

Rural Center Supervisor at Lower Tammany School 

B. A. University of Minnesota. 

Louise Shaff Blomquist . . . .Assistant in Dep't. of History and Civics 
Student, Lewiston State Normal School; A. B., University of 
Washington; Graduate Student, University of Washington, 
and University of California. 

Carrie E. M. Burks 

Supervisor of Primary Department (Grades I-IV) 
Graduate S. N. S., Edmond, Oklahoma. Student, University of 
California >and University of Chicago ;{ B. &, Columbia 

University. 

Charles Chessman 

Supervising Principal of Training School; Acting Head of 
Department of Mathematics and Geography. 
A. B. Harvard University; Student, Bridgewater S. N. S.; 
Graduate Student, University of California, and Teachers' 
College, Columbia University. 

A. Roy Combs Head of Department of Agriculture 

Graduate Normal Department, Highland Park College, Des 
Moines, Iowa; B. S. A., Iowa State Agricultural College, Ames 
Iowa. 

Besse E. Combs Penmanship 

Graduate Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa; Student State 
University, Iowa City, Iowa; Student State 'J'eachers' College, 
Cedar Palls, Iowa; Palmer Method Teacher's Certificate. 

Mary Royce Crawford Librarian 

Diploma Library Training School, Riverside, California. 

Ruth Fauble Head of Department of Home Economics 

Graduate Western Illinois State Normal; B. S., University of 
Idaho; Student, University of Washington. 

8 



Herbert E. Fowler 

Dean of Men and Head of Department of English 
Graduate S. N. S., Mansfield, Pennsylvania; A. B. Princeton 
University. 

Alvida L. Hansen Rural Center Supervisor at the Sweetwater 

School; Graduate, Lewiston State Normal School. 

Jean G. Henderson Rural Center Superv' isor at Myrtle 

Valley City Normal Schol, Valley City, N. D.; Student at 
University of North Dakota. 

Edith Hibbard Assistant in Library 

Diploma. Library Training iSchool, Riverside, California. 

M. Edith Jones Piano 

Graduate Oberlin Conservatory; B. Music, Oberlin College; 
Student in Conservatory of Music, Leipzig. 

Florence Kitchen Special Room Teacher in 5th and 6th Grades 

Graduate Iowa State Teachers' College and of lowa State 
Teachers' College Training School. 

Edna M. Lockwood Rural Center Supervisor at Gurney School 

Graduate,. Lewiston State Normal School; Student, Univer- 
sity of Idaho. 

Margaret M. McCarthy Assistant in the Department of English 

Graduate Emerson College of Oratory; B. A., University of 
Wisconsin. 

Grace McCollister . . . .Assistant in Department of Home Economics 
(Domestic Science) 

Graduate S. N. S., Santa Barbara, California. B. S., Univer- 
sity of California. 

Alice McDonald Special Room Teacher In 1st and 2nd Grades 

Graduate, Lewiston State Normal School. 

Elizabeth McDonald. .... .Rural Center Supervisor at Hatwai School 

Student, Northwestern Academy, Evanston, Illinois; Student, 
Agricultural College. Logan, Utah. 

Pearl McEachran Assistant in Department of Science 

Graduate, Lewiston State Normal School. 

Mary Wilson McGahey. .Head of Department of Pine and Applied Arts 
A. B., Nebraska University; B, S., Columbia University. 

Virginia Mary Mann Fine Arts 

Cincinnati Art Academy and Teachers' College of Cincinnati, 

Melissa M. Minger. Rural Center Supervisor at Upper Tammany School 
Graduate, Lewiston State Normal School. 

Bernita Ninneman Special Room Teacher in 3rd and 4th Grades 

Graduate, S. N. S., Mankato, Minnesota; Graduate Student 
Lewiston State Normal School. 

Margaret C. Schemel Supervisor Junior High School 

Graduate, Wayne State Normal School, Nebraska; Graduate, 
University of Nebraska. 

9 



Henry L. Talkington Head of Department of History and Civics 

A. B., and A. M., Drury College, Springfield, Missouri. 

Edith Thompson Assistant in Department of Physical Education 

Graduate, Lewiston State Normal School; Student, University 
of California. 

Myrtle Treadwell Head of Department of Public School Music 

Northern Illinois Normal School; Columbia School of Music. 

Margaret Griffith Tyler Head of Department of Science 

A. B,, and Teacher's Diploma, University of Michigan; S. M., 
University of Michigan; S, M., University of Chicago. 

Irene Watson Head of Department of Physical Education 

Graduate, Western Illinois State Normal School; Graduate, 
Sargent School for Physical Education. 

Glentworth M. Willson Assistant in Department of Education 

Ph. B. Alfred University, Graduate Student, Columbia 
University. 

B. Evangeline Wiseman Director of Rural Education 

Graduate, Lev/iston State Normal School. 



, Assistant in Department of Home 

Economics (Domestic Art.) 



LEWISTON STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

GENERAL INFORMATION. 

The Lewiston State Normal School was created by an act of the 
Legislature in 1893, but the first building was not erected until 1896, 
at which time a campus of ten acres was given to it by the City of 
Lewiston. Now it consists of four buildings and a campus of twenty- 
five acres. The growth of the institution has been gradual but steady. 
Two dormitories, one for women, one for men, were erected in 1899; 
but the present dormitory for women, Lewis Hall, was built In 1907. 
The Gymnasium building was also erected in 1907, and the Domestic 
Science building in 1912. The first addition to the main building was 
made in 1905 when the east wing was built; the west wing has been 
under construction during the past winter. 

A most disastrous fire occurred in December, 1917, which destroy- 
ed the entire east wing of the Administration Building and Injured the 
main part of the structure; the west wing, under construction at the 
time, was not damaged. This fire entailed the utter loss of the very 
fine library of the Normal as well as the destruction of valuable files, 
records and bulletins. But owing to the prompt helpfulness of local 
Institutions temporary quarters were furnished so that the work of 
the Normal went on without interruption. Generous contributions 
came in not only from Lewiston people but from all over the State 
and from the other State institutions, so that a good-sized library of 
books and magazines was well-organized by February, 1918. A wooden 
building was put up for the training school; class rooms were ar- 
ranged for in the Domestic Science building and in the Gymnasium, 
and the residence used for a boys' dormitory. While the temporary 
quarters were crowded and limited, the regular Normal School worlo 
was continued as usual. 

The central portion of the old Administration building has been 
restored, and the west wing has been completed. The remodeled 
building will be used for the training school, administrative offices 
and library. 

The buildings and grounds of the Normal are ideally located on 
Normal Hill, a residence section of Lewiston. A.nd Lewiston, a natural 
home city and a most fitting location for a state institution, Is situated 
at the confluence of two of the greatest rivers of the Northwest, — the 
Snake and the Clearwater. It Is well served by railroads and will 
be a terminal for the proposed North-South Highway and also for the 

11 



Montana-Idaho Highway, which is under construction. Added to 
these advantages, those who temporarily make their home in the city 
enjoy the benefits of a well organized community life and are sur- 
rounded by the best facilities for promoting their religious and social, 
as well as their physical, welfare. 

The School is a State institution and desires especially that the 
citizens of Idaho become familiar with its purposes, its facilities for 
its special work, and the character of the results being obtained. To 
this end all citizens of the State are urged to visit this institution 
whenever they are in this part of the State. Citizens of Lewiston and 
vicinity are urged to become more directly acquainted with the School 
by making frequent visits to classrooms, laboratories, and the library, 
and by continuing their generous patronage of the special lectures and 
entertainments given under the auspices of the School. 

Addresses on educational topics, illustrated lectures and demon- 
strations in art, music, home economics and agriculture, and special 
programs are presented in General Assemblies. The School cordially 
welcomes all who are interested in attending these exercises. 
Schedule of Assemblies for the Year 1918-1919. 

All Assemblies are held in the Normal School Gymnasium from 
9:30 to 10:10 o'clock every morning. 

Mondays — in charge of the "Associated Students." 

Tuesdays and Thursdays — Chorus Practice in charge of the Super- 
visor of Public School Music. 

Wednesdays — in charge of the President 

Fridays — in charge of Faculty-Student Committee. 
School Publications. 

The Lewistonian, an eight-page publication issued semi-monthly, 
is published under the auspices of the Associated Students organiza- 
tion, and covers the fortnightly doings of students and faculty. 

ElCvSenes, the Senior annual, is published by the graduating class 
In May, and contains a record of school activities for the year, to- 
gether with much personal reference to members of the School. 
Elesenes is attractively illustrated with cuts and photographic repro- 
ductions. 
Student Organizations. 

It is the general policy of the School to foster all such organiza- 
tions of the Student Body as can be made to serve as media for the 
special interests and activities of the various groups of students. While 
all such groups are under the advisory control and direction of the 
school, it is desired at all times that they shall be conducted almost 
wholly by the students themselves. 

Since the opportunities for training in Initiative and leadership are 
more or less limited it becomes especially desirable that the students 
shall take advantage of every opportunity afforded by their own 
organizations. 

The Tiiterary Club. This Is a student organization composed of 
those who are Interested In promoting literary activities. The mem- 

12 




j)()i\n':sTic scii^]Nci'] bitildjng 

GYMNASIUM 



bership is regulated thru a simple try-out, to which all the members 
of the School are eligible. These try-outs are held at the beginning of 
each quarter. The Literary Club meets monthly in private session; 
at these times interesting and instructive programs, planned and 
executed by committees from the Club, are rendered. Music, plays, 
papers, recitations, dialogues, stories, — all are given a share in the 
work of the organization. Twice during the school year the Literary 
Club presents an entertainment for the public. During the first part 
of 1918 these two programs consisted of a most creditable St. Patrick's 
entertainment and an interesting Patriotic Benefit, play, entitled 
"Somewhere in France." 

Athletics. The athletic activities participated in by the girls in- 
clude swimming meets, tennis tournaments, paper chases and hikes, 
basket ball and indoor baseball, beside athletic contests in the gym- 
nasium. 

Athletic activities open to young men attending the School include 
track, tennis, swimming, basket ball and baseball. An especial feature 
has been made of basket ball contests. 

Science. The Science Club was organized for the purpose of foster- 
ing especial interest in recent developments in the field of applied 
science. All students who show especial proficiency in Science are 
eligible to membership in the Club. It meets weekly to discuss cur- 
rent science, and it has field trips. 

Glee Club.. The Glee Club has a membership of approximately 
twenty-seven students. It meets one evening a week for practice. 
The Club, a voluntary organization, has been generous in contributing 
musical numbers In assemblies and for many special entertainments 
given by the School. In May they gave a charming Operetta entitled 
"The Japanese Girl," staged on the Campus in front of Lewis Hall. 

The Associated Students of the IJewlston State Normal SchooL 
During the spring quarter, 1917, the student body organized as "The 
Associated Students of Lewiston State Normal School." The con- 
stitution of the organization states that the object is "to promote con- 
centrated efforts in student activities that concern the student body 
as a whole." The officers of the association are president, vice-presi- 
dent, secretary, treasurer and athletic, literary, social, music and 
science commissioners. These officers, with the assistance of the 
various student committees, have general control over all student 
activities. Members of the faculty act in an advisory capacity. Dur- 
ing the year one assembly period a week will be in charge of the 
Associated Students at which time they will give programs or discuss 
matters of business. 
What to do when you reach Ijewiston. 

For the information and guidance of students who are coming 
to Lewiston for the first time, and in particular for those who have not 
made the necessary living arrangements in advance, the following 
detailed statement is given. 

Secure living accommodations thru the office of the Dean of 

13 



Women, telephone 1126, or the Dean of Men, telephone 924-J. Plan 
to arrive in Lewiston in the day time so that living arrangements may 
be made before night. If late arrival is unavoidable, however, stud- 
ents should telephone to the Dean of Women or the Dean of Men to 
be directed to accommodations for the night. 

Students arriving on day trains should take a taxi-cab (telephone 
550, or 560, or 743-y, if there are no cabs at the station; the charge 
is 25c for a taxi), and go at once to the office of the Dean in the 
Administration Building on the Normal School campus. Those who 
have been assigned rooms in Lewis Hall should go directly to that 
building from the train. Those who have no assignment of room may 
check their baggage at the parcel check room connected with the news 
stand at the west end of the station. 

At the office of the Dean of Women students will be assisted in 
finding satisfactory homes where they may have room and board, or 
do light housekeeping, or may give household assistance in exchange 
for room and board. Accommodations in Lewis Hall may also be 
arranged for with the Dean of Women. 

Accommodations for men should be arranged for with the Dean 
of Men. 
Answers to Questions. 

The division of subject matter into courses is, in general, based 
upon the amount of work which can be done in one quarter. Students 
may enter at the opening of any quarter of the year and commence, 
or continue, any of the general courses to advantage. However, 
students are encouraged to enter either at the opening of school, 
September 16, 1918, or at the opening of the Second Semester, Feb- 
ruary 3, 1919. 

If you are in doubt concerning being able to meet the entrance 
requirements for normal school work, send a transcript of your prev- 
ious training to the Recorder stating definitely your plans. Please 
use the perforated sheet next to the back cover of this bulletin for 
this purpose, or apply to the School for a similar blank. 

Work completed in standardized institutions will be accepted for 
credit toward certification or graduation from this school In so far as 
the work submitted is transferable in the course for which the candi- 
date registers, provided, that not less than one-half the credits re- 
quired for certificates or diplomas shall be earned in residence in the 
Lewiston State Normal school. 

Students entering the Lewiston State Normal School for the first 
time must present evidence of their previous training on or before the 
day they register. Those who expect to enter September 16 are urged 
to send their records in before September 1st. 

Holders of Normal School certificates who wish renewals are 
asked to submit the names and addresses of references (3) and write 
direct to the office of the President for a statement as to what further 
requirements, if any, must be satisfied. For the most part, high school 

14 



graduates may renew Normal School certificates upon satisfactory- 
evidence of success in teaching. 
Piano and Voice Liessons. 

Private lessons in Piano are offered by the School at the following 
rates: 

One lesson per week, per quarter, $9.00. 

Two lessons per week, per quarter, $17.00. 

Use of practice piano per quarter (1 hour daily) is $2.00. 

Piano students who are not regularly enrolled in the school for 
other courses are required to pay the regular registration fee of 50c 
per quarter. The quarters are each nine weeks in length. All piano 
and voice students must register for their work promptly at the open- 
ing of the quarter; otherwise a full quarter of work cannot be ex- 
pected. Lessons are made up in cases of illness. Lessons missed for 
any other reason are made up at the discretion of the instructor. The 
work in this department follows the same schedule as work in all 
other departments of the school. Fees are payable strictly in advance. 

Private lessons in Voice are offered by private teachers in the 
city. The rates will vary according to the teacher secured. The 
School recommends Mrs. Florence Foster Hammond, who has studied 
with Madam Lucie Valair of Paris and Franz X. Areus of New York 
City. She gives voice and stage deportment, teaching not only correct 
breathing and placing but poise as well. She has been notably suc- 
cessful in her work with her pupils. 

Credit will be allowed for the Piano work under the direction of 
the School and for Voice work when completed with the approval of 
the School. Schedule for piano work must be arranged with Miss 
Jones; schedule for voice work must have the approval of Mrs. 
Treadwell. 



15 



ACCOMMODATION FOR STUDENTS AND 
EXPENSES 



For the information of all students attending the School the fol- 
lowing summary is made setting forth the various types of accommo- 
dations available. 

1. Rooms for Women.. Lewis Hall, the dormitory for women, ac- 
commodates sixty-six women for both room and board. The Dining- 
room is open to all students for table board at $4.50 per week. 

2. Rooms for Men. The Dean of Men has a list of available 
rooms in private homes that are recommended by the School, and 
assists all men to locate themselves comfortably. The dining-room 
is open to all students for table board at $4.50 per week. Further 
Information In detail may be found under the statement regarding 
the Lewis Hall dining-room and under the heading concerning outside- 
accommodations (Page 18). 

3. Outside Accommodations. 

(a) Rooms in affiliated private homes under the supervision 
of the Dean of Women and the Dean of Men. 

(b) Rooms furnished for light housekeeping. Only a limited 
number are available. 

(c) Cottages furnished or unfurnished. Only a limited 
number are available. 

1. LEWIS HALL 

Lewis Hall, the dormitory for women, was completed February 1, 
1908. The building is most artistic and most complete in its appoint- 
ments, and provides home accommodations which are almost ideal for 
students. The architecture is after the early English type, and pres- 
ents a most home-like appearance. The interior wood finish is of a 
quarter-sawed fir, stained, and all the rooms are appropriately deco- 
rated. The building has accommodations for from sixty-four to sixty- 
six students, in addition to such accommodations as are set aside for the 
official household. The commodious living-room, library and dining- 
room, with their artistic finish and large open fireplaces, form centers 
for social life of the type which contributes especially to general cul- 
ture in the student body. The furniture thruout is of solid oak In 
mission design. 

Among the many rooms, all of which are steam-heated, electric- 
lighted, and provided with hot and cold water, doubtless the most 
attractive are the sixteen suite consisting of a study and alcove bed- 
room. Each such suite has an open fireplace in addition to the steam 
heat. All rooms are equipped with rugs, study tables, chairs, bureaus, 
and T. M. C. A. cots with excellent springs, mattresses, and pillows, 
couch covers, hangings, and swiss curtains for the windows are also 
provided. Thruout the building every arrangement has been mad© 
that Is essential to the comfort, happiness and good health of the 
students. A bath-room Is provided for every eight students. 

16 




J.IOVVISTOXIAX 



r.LKK CLUB 



ijtI':i:ai:v clt'ii 



A I IT CLUB 



Adbmlnistratlon. 

The women students who live in Lewis Hall are under the discip- 
linary supervision of the Dean of Women, who is a member of tho 
faculty of the institution. The social life of all the women of the 
School is under the direct supervision of the Dean. The Dean has also 
the executive control of the administration of Lewis Hall. Students 
not living in Lewis Hall will secure the approval of the Dean so far as 
residence outside the Hall is concerned. This is necessary to assure 
proper attention to the private life of each student and to protect 
every one who enters Ihe School. Under these circumstances, parents 
may rely upon the School to cooperate with them in caring for the 
yovng women entrusted to it. 
Home Liife. 

Care is taken to render the home life not only comfortable and 
pleasant, but also conducive to the cultivation of those graces of char- 
acter which mark refined women. Only such restrictions are throv/n 
around students in residence as are considered important for their 
health, for the best conduct of their work, and for their personal 
improvement. Importance is attached to the cultivation of that con- 
siderate regard for the wishes and feelings of others which leads to 
courteous deportment and to proper social adjustment. Thruout th« 
year definite instruction in good form is given by the Dean. 

A library well supplied with standard essays, works of fiction, and 
current magazines, contributes in no small degree to the attractive- 
ness of the life of Lewis Hall. 
Care of the Health. 

The health of the students is carefully safeguarded, both by the 
Department of Physical Education and by those In charge of the 
living arrangements and the disciplinary supervision of the students. 
To this end regular hours for study, recreation and sleep are required. 
At Lewis Hall most careful attention is given to the preparation 
and serving of meals. The School also endeavors to keep in touch with 
the living conditions of students outside of the Hall and thru advice 
and suggestions to aid such students in establishing and maintaining 
wholesome standards of living. 
Assignment and Care of Rooms. 

In the assignment of roms, precedence is given to those who have 
been longest in residence, but after May 20th of each year assignments 
will be made In order of request. 

The occupants of each room are expected to keep it in order. All 
rooms are frequently inspected by the Matron of Lewis Hall. 

Suites are assigned only to two students. No Assignment of Rooms 
will be Made Unless Application for Same Is Accompanied by a Do- 
posit of $5.00. This amount will be retained as a guarantee deposit 
for the protection of property used by each student and will be cred- 
ited on the final payment of board, less any deductions for breakage 
or damage to property. 

Should a person after having had a room assigned, for any reason, 

17 



wish to have this assignment cancelled, the $5.00 deposit will be re- 
funded, provided, application for same is received before September 
16 th. Applications for rooms should be made to the Dean of Women. 
Remittance should be made by postoffice orders, express money order 
or by bank draft, made payable to the Lcwlston State Normal School. 
Student's Outfit. 

Each student in residence in Lewis Hall is expected to provide the 
following outfit: 

1. Six table napkins, approximately 22 by 22 inches. 

2. A napliin ring, 

3. Three pairs of sheets, approximately 1 1^ by 2 i/i yards. 

4. Three pillow slips, 20 by 28 inches. 

5. The necessary blankets, comforts, towels and dresser covers. 
All articles should be plainly and durably marked with the name 

of the owner. 

Students using the laundry are required to provide themselves 
with clothes pins, iron holders, ironing blankets and sheets. A charge 
of 50c a quarter — i. e. nine weeks — will be made for the use of the 
electric current for ironing. Students who expect to do their own 
laundry should provide electric irons. It is required that electric irons 
be used only in the laundry. 
Ijewis Hall Dining-Room. 

For the accommodation of students who cannot be assigned to 
rooms in Lewis Hall, but who are none the less under the direct sup- 
ervision of the School, table board is afforded in Lewis Hall at the 
regular charge of $4.50 per week. Because of the low charge for 
table board it is impossible to make any deduction or remittance for 
absence from meals. 

3. OUTSIDE ACCOMMODATIONS. 

Rooms in Affiliated Private Homes. 

Rooms in private homes in the best residence section of the city 
surrounding the Normal School are obtainable for students and will be 
reserved by the School on the same basis as reservations are made in 
Lewis Hall. The prices range from $8.00 to $12.00 a month for rooms 
large enough to accommodate two people and from $6.00 to $10.00 for 
single rooms. In those cases the necessary bedding is supplied by the 
one from whom the room is rented. These rooms are under the direct 
supervision of the Dean of Women and the Dean of Men. 
Rooms Furnished for liight Housekeeping. 

Altho not especially recommended by the School, yet opportunities 
are available for those who prefer to undertake light housekeeping. 
The School does not recommend this method of living as being par- 
ticularly economical, especially when interference with study and in- 
sufficient opportunity for recreation are considered. The regular 
demands of the school work are so heavy each day that, unless stu- 
dents are especially capable In managing and above the average In 
their knowledge of Home Economics, it is difficult to live satisfactorily 

18 




C;VMNASTICS OUT OF DOORS 
I'.ASKKT |;AI;l team ST. PATRICK'S DAY COUPLE 

fip::ld day dance 



by engaging in light housekeeping. However, for all who desire to do 
so the school will exert every effort to be of assistance both in secur- 
ing such accommodations and also in furnishing advice from time to 
time thruout the year. The head of the Department of Home Econ- 
omics will render direct guidance in the matter of the daily food supply 
of all who undertake light housekeeping. 
Cottages Furnished or Unfurnished. 

Any who desire furnished or unfurnished cottages should com- 
municate directly with the Dean of Women or the Dean of Men for 
further information. 

COST OF BOARD AND ROOM 

For the purpose of making an estimate of the cost ol living, th« 
cost per quarter in the school dormitories, for room and board, includ- 
ing light, heat and general use of laundry and telephone, may be taken 
as $49.50. The financial policy is to charge sufficient to guarantee 
that the Hall be self-sustaining, and at the same time assure th© 
student good living at cost. 
Cost of Liaundry. 

In so far as it is possible to do so the laundry will be made avail- 
able for the use of the students living in private homes as well as 
those living in Lewis Hall. 

All bills are due and payable at the office of the Financial Secretary 
the first of each quarter in advance: September '6 and November 18, 
1918; February 3 and April 7, 1919. In cases where bills remain un- 
paid for five days after the beginning of a quarter, parents will be 
notified directly concerning the same. 

A limited number of guests of students in residence will be en- 
tertained at a nominal rate. 

Consultation with the Matron of Lewis Hall must be had before 
t;he invitation is given. 

EXPENSE ESTIMATED FOR A YEAR. 

As the expense of attending the Normal School will vary greatly 
with the individual tastes of students, it is possible to give only a 
conservative estimate, as follows: 

Four quarters room and board at $49.50 $198.00 

Books and stationery (estimated) 18.00 

Library fee, two semesters, at $1.00 2.00 

Student Activity fee 3.00 

Gymnasium suit, (estimated) 5.00 

Estimated necessary expenses $226.00 

No special laboratory fees are charged In any of the special de- 
partments but the School reserves the right to charge a special fee 
in case any student undertakes a problem Involving the use of costly 
material not in general use for class work. 

19 



No tuition tee is charged for students registered in the regular 
session. 

All other fees for the year are due and payable upon registration. 

Upon personal application fees will be returned to students who 
withdraw within ten days after the date of registering. 

Students who leave school during or at the close of the first 
semester will be entitled to a refund of the second semester fees, pro- 
vided application for same is made in person not later than ten days 
after the opening of the second semester. 

RAn.ROAD SEKVIOE. 

Lewiston is served by the N. P. Railway and its branches, includ- 
ing the Camas Prairie Railroad and th« Clearwater Short Line 
branch, connecting with northern and central Idaho points, and by 
the O.-W. R. & N. Company connecting with all points in southern 
Idaho. For a number of years the School has made a practice of 
arranging for a special sleeping-car for students from south Idaho 
points so that students coming from that section of the state may 
experience no inconvenience at junction points en route to Liewistoa 

If a sufficient number of students from south Idaho inform the 
President that they will avail themselves of the convenience of thia 
special sleeping-car service, arrangements will be made to secure the 
car. Students interested should communicate with the Office of the 
President not later than September 1. If secured, this car will be 
attached to the regular west-bound Portland train, No. 19, passing 
through south Idaho points on the afternoon and evening of Satur- 
day, September 14th, and arriving in Lewiston at 4:20 on the after- 
noon of Sunday, September 15th. Students coming from points on 
branch lines in south Idaho should plan to leave home in time to 
connect at the nearest junction point with the above through train. 

Students from the extreme north location of Idaho will reach 
Lewiston most dirctly by way of iSpokane. The Palouse branch of 
the N. P. runs two trains daily to Lewiston. For the accommodation 
of students the best train is the one leaving Spokane in the morning 
and arriving in Lewiston in the afternoon. 

STUDENT AID. 

The School desires to aid students in finding opportunities for 
self-help. 

For young women, the most productive means of self-support Is 
assisting in the care of private homes. The usual compensation for 
such service ia room and board. Other sources of income are, (1) 
caring for children at night, (2) serving in private homes for social 
occasions, (3) assisting with plain sewing. 

Young men are occasionally given opportunity to assist the 
janitor in caring for the grounds and buildings. Occasional inquiries 
come for young men who can care for lawns and gardens, or do 
other work around private houses. 

20 



Altho employment for young men is not regular and can seldom 
be secured in advance, the school will actively cooperate with stu- 
dents in finding remunerative work. Ordinarily it is inadvisable for 
a student to enter with less than enough to pay necessary expenses 
for one quarter or nine weeks. During that interval it is possible 
to get in touch with sources of employment. 

Fruit-picking and packing give opportunity for work outside of 
school hours, during the fruit season. Help is most needed during 
the cherry season which comes usually at the time of the Summer 
Session. 

To meet the demand for self-help the Dean of Women and the 
Dean of Men maintain an employment bureau for the students. 
Student Loan Fund, 

This fund is used to assist students, who find for financial reasons 
they are unable to continue their Normal School work. The amount 
comprising this fund has been received from the following sources: 
The Y. W. C. A., the Boise Columbian Club, and the Tsceminicum 
Club; several individuals have also contributed generously. 

Students who have been In attendance at the Normal School for 
two quarters, and who furnish satisfactory references, will upon 
receipt of proper application to the President be granted loans in 
any amount not to exceed fifty dollars. Notes in the amount of ten 
dollars each are given to cover the loan, the first note being payable 
in October, or at the end of the student's first month of teaching. 
Payments are made monthly thereafter until the full amount of the 
loan is paid. No interest is charged. 

EXTENSION WORK. 

The following lines of work are Illustrative of the types of exten- 
sion service which have been established: 
Agriculture. 

To the teachers in the rural schools desiring to do some valuable 
work for the community in the teaching of agriculture, the Lewiston 
State Normal School will furnish, free of cost, the use of a Babcook 
Milk Tester for a period of one week. The school receiving the us© 
of the tester, however, must pay transportation by parcels post, both 
ways. An amount covering the cost of transportation one way, on 
a weight of fourteen pounds, should accompany the application. 

Since the number of testers on hand is quite limited, those desir- 
ing the use of one should file their applications early. 

To avoid delay after the arrival of the tester, the school should 
have ready for use one pound of concentrated commercial sulphuric 
acid. The acid can be had for about ten cents per pound. One pound 
will be sufficient for testing several cows. 

Only teachers having seventh or eighth grade pupila should apply 
for the use of a tester. 

The application should include the foUwIng: 

21 



1. The address to which the tester is to be «ent. 

2. Sum covering the cost of transportation by parcels post on« 
way. (Applicant also to pay return charges.) 

Idaho Rural Teacher's ]Mionitor. 

The Rural Teacher's Monitor is a small paper published by the 
Rural Department. This paper, which js issued monthly during the 
regular session, is devoted especially to the problems of teachera 
working in the rural schools of Idaho. It is expected that teachers 
who are In their first year of service will find it of greatest assistance. 

The "Monitor" is sent to all of our graduates, to all who hold 
Normal School certificates, and to all the rural teachers of Idaho so 
far as we are able to secure the addresses of such teachers. Anyone 
wishing this paper may secure it upon request. If your address 
changes before the May number is issued, please advise us as to what 
address we may send the last number. 
School liibraries. 

No. 1. 

Country Life and the Country School, Carney. 

Games for the Playground, School and Gymnasium, Bancroft. 

Pine-Needle Basket Book. 

A Simple Card charging system for School Libraries, Rural Small 

Public Libraries. 
Farm Arithmetic, Jessie Fields. 
Suggestions for Organization of Field Day and Play Picnic for 

Country Child, Scudder. 
Boys' and Girls' Home Economics: 1. Primer of Instruction. 

2. Potato Growing. 
School Laws of Idaho. 
Lewiston State Normal School Bulletins — 

Oral English. 

Social Activities for Rural Schools. 

Outline for Study of History of Idaho. 

List of Books for Elementary and Rural Schols. 

No. 2. 

Children's Singing Games, Marie Hofer. 

Country Life and Country School, Carney. 

Reading in Public Schools, Briggs and Coffman. 

Primary Handwork, Dobbs. 

One Woman's Work for Farm Women, Jennie Buell. 

List of Books for Elementary and Rural Schools. 

Suggestions for the Organization of a Field Day and Play Picnic 

for Country Children, Scudder. 
Good Lunches for Rural Schools Without a Kitchen. 
Farm and Home Mechanics. 
Lewiston State Normal School Bulletin — 

Social Activities for Rural Schools. 

22 



Seatwork for Rural Schools. 
School Libraries. 

No. 3. 

Farm Arithmetic, Burket. 

How to Tell Stories to Children, Bryant. 

School Drawing, Daniels. 

Corn Lady, Field. 

Rural School Leaflets, Cornell, 

Course in Sewing. 

Farmers' Chautauquas. 

Farm Arithmetic, Field. 

Language. 

Outline Lessons in Housekeeping. 

Occupation Seat Work for Rural Schools. 

School Libraries. 

Other lists are being compiled and will be mailed upon request 
as fast as they are completed. This work is considered of especial 
value for small one-room rural schools in which the teacher and the 
children have little opportunity to come in touch with books of interest 
and value. The work as here undertaken is being done in only a very 
small way, but will be enlarged as conditions in the school justify. 

Picture Collections. 

Several sets of one hundred selected copies of reproductions of 
paintings dealing with subjects of art, literature and the sciences are 
available for loan to rural schools. These packets may be kept four 
weeks. They are to be returned at the expense of the borrower. 

Victrolas. 

In order that the children of the more remote rural schools 
may have an opportunity to hear some of the better music and to 
play some of the organized games that need special music, arrange- 
ments have been made to loan a limited number of schools a victrola 
with an appropriate collection of records. The machines are shipped 
for the expense of transportation and the assumption of repair costs 
in case of breakages. Advice in making up collection of records, or 
in selecting some text books, will be sent upon request. 

Ijantem Slides on the following subjects are available and fre- 
quently it can be arranged so that a member of the faculty can b© 
secured to give the accompanying lecture: 

1. Industries. 

2. Commercial Cities. 

3. Sciences. 

4. Peoples and Customs. 

5. History and Literature. 

6. Fine Art. 

Requests for Bulletins and "loan" materials and the direction of 
home-study for professional advancement coming from teachers-in- 

23 



service are attended to promptly thru correspondence, if addressed 
to the Director of Rural Education. Altho it is never the purpose of 
the School to divert any question which should go direct to the office 
of the county superintendent or other educational agencies of the 
state, it is glad to render personal help, either thru visitation or cor- 
respondence, whenever possible, and to this end frequently cooperates 
with the county superintendents in "following up" the teachers who 
have received their training in this institution, especially those teach- 
ers who are teaching their first school. 

Upon request the Normal School endeavors to assist teachers and 
school officials in securing speakers for community meetings or 
similar organizations, in making plan» for the arrangement, the 
building and the equipment of new buildings or the making over of 
old buildings, and in handling any specific problem pertaining to the 
work of the normal school. 



Appointment Conunittee. 



The major part of the student body goes directly into teaching 
each year. This is quite in accordance with the policy of the school 
which is that of preparing teachers as quickly and as directly for 
their work as is consistent with required standards in our State. 
Trained teachers are in demand, and this School will always welcome 
inquiries for such teachers. It is the purpose of the administration 
of the School to be as helpful as possible to public school officials, 
and with that end in view, it will strive to place its teachers so that 
they may serve the State with credit to themselves and to the educa- 
tional interests involved. 

For the past ten years v/e have maintained a special connmittee 
on appointments, and the Appointment Secretary serves as a medium 
of communication between our students and school officials. The 
purpose of this service is, first, to foster a spirit of interest and cooper- 
ation betv/een this School and the public school officials; second, to as- 
sist each graduate and every one who has had training in this school, 
to secure the kind of position for which he is best fitted by education, 
training and personality. The Committee furnishes confidential infor- 
mation concerning candidates for the consideration of school officials 
who are about to hire teachers. 

This Committee bears a very close relationship to the actual 
accomplishments of the School and to facilitate this work: 

1. It secures information concerning vacancies in schools thruout 
the State, getting in detail the needed information as to grades in 
which vacancies exist and the special demand of such positions. 

2. It investigates the records of students in all the departments 
of the school and prepares a report which becomes ihe basis for mak- 
ing recommendations. 

3. It makes definite recommendations of one or more candidates, 
thus avoiding over-crowding of applications, and at the same time 

24 



preventinc: the consideration of applicants for types of worl-c to which 
they are not adapted, either by nature or training-. 

4. It affords teachers better prospects for success, and g-lve.3 
BChool boards better assurance of receiving competent service. 

Records of students are centralized in the Recorder's office and 
students should apply to the Recorder for letters of recommendation 
or statements of any kind concerning work completed in the School. 

The Appointment Committee in addition to dealing with the 
matter of appointments, secures each year, from school boards and 
superintendents employing our teachers, definite reports concerning 
the success or failure of individuals, and these reports are filed each 
year and become a part of the permanent information, forming a 
basis for recommendations. The work of this bureau serves as a 
continuing bond between the Normal School and its former students, 
for it follows them up and secures confidential reports of the kind 
and character of work they are doing in their schools. This sys- 
tematic effort to keep in touch with former students, maintains, in 
spite of distances, some semblance of comradeship in educational 
endeavor. Students who are candidatefci for certificates or diploma3 
are advised to register with the Committee. The assistance of the 
Committee is given free to all students and alumni desiring it. 

WAR ACTIVITIES COURSES 

In compliance with the request of the Government that all educa- 
tional institutions render the greatest possible service to our country 
during the war period, the Normal School is offering a number of 
courses in war activities. These will be conducted in accordance with 
the requirements and suggestions of the Government, the Food Ad- 
ministration, the Red Cross, the Council of Defense and the National 
Security League. 

It is hoped that all students will avail themselves of these 
courses, in order that they may render, in their respective commun- 
ities, the greatest possible service to our country in this hour of need, 
by intelligent cooperation with the Red Cross, the Council of Defense, 
the Food Administration and the other organizations, whose duty and 
privilege it is to support and strengthen the Government during the 
war period. The Courses briefly are as follows: 
1. Food Conservation Courses. 

Food Conservation: This course aims to give general information 
on dietary conditions in this and other countries, to teach the prin- 
ciples of cookery, and such variations as apply to certain substitutes 
which all are now required to purchase; economic problems arising 
from these conditions will also be considered. 

The Rural Home Ecomonics work aims to give to the teacher in 
-country communities likewise, a knowledge of substitute foods, their 
values and preparation in regard to the school lunch problem. An 
■opportunity is thus opened to her to become a valuable asset to her 

25 



community thru the introduction of canning and cooltery clubs. On 
the days devoted to sewing-, instruction will be given in Red Cross 
work for the community, Belgian relief and various related activities 
for Juniors as well as the making of articles utilizing ordinary and in- 
expensive fabrics for purposes of beauty and utility in home and 
school-rooms. 
2. Dietetics. 

A certificate in Dietetics from the Red Cross will be awarded to 
any student of creditable standing. The problem of feeding in relation 
to cost and nutrition, the family menu relative to food conservation, 
and the fuel or calorie value of ordinary foods will be topics considered. 
o. Home Nursing. 

This will be offered only if there be a sufficient demand for it. 
It is given under the direction of a trained nurse and a Certificate is 
given by the Red Cross for the satisfactory completion of the course. 
This is a most valuable course for every one, whether she is interested 
in nursing or not; it gives practical training to fit one to meet the 
emergencies that may come up in caring for any one in the family. 

4. Fii'st Aid to the Injured. 

This will be offered in the Department of Physical Education only 
if there is sufficient demand for it. It is given under the direcc'on of 
a qualified physician, and a Certificate in First Aid is given by the 
Red Cross for a satisfactory fulfillment of requirements. 

5. Information Courses — History and Civics. 

This course is under the direction of the Department of History, 
and includes a brief history of the government and people of the 
warrinvT nations of central Europe; direct and indirect causes of the 
war; the fighting forces of this country, how they are obtained, or- 
ganized, trained and provided with food, shelter and munitions of war; 
the manner in which the citizen aids in the prosecution of the war; 
the means provided for caring for the soldier and his family; what 
the nation proposes to gain by the war. 

6. Infoi*niation Courses — Geography. 

This course is under the direction of the Department of Geogra- 
phy, and follows the different fields of action to make the geographic 
condition explain the course of events; reviews the resources of all 
nations engaged; investigates the food supplies of both sides; and re- 
views the social condition of each government taking part in the war, 
relative to their forms of government, numerical strength, and char- 
acter of the people. 

7. Information Courses — Knglish. 

(a) Oral English: This course will be largely devoted to war 
information thru various agencies. Material for class use will be ob- 
tained from daily papers and news-magazines, war information pamph- 
lets and "The Forum of Democracy." There will be much free dis- 
cussion, as well as debates, both prepared and extemporaneous. The 

26 



"Four-Minute" plan will be emphasized. This class will be self- 
managed, the instructor acting in the capacity of critic. 

(b) American Literature: This course might have as its sub- 
title, "The Development of American Ideals Thru Literature." In 
other words, our national literature will be studied in the light of the 
growth of democracy in America. Every great national writer has 
contributed something to this movement. 

8. War Courses in Agricultui*e. 

During this war, maximum food production is necessary, and the 
encouragement of all forms of increased activities in agriculture along 
the lines of soil fertility, field crops, live stock production, fruit grow- 
ing and gardening is therefore of the highest patriotism. 

The courses in general agriculture and club work will be viewed 
from these angles, keeping in mind and emphasizing the importance 
of increased production. 

9. Community Singing. 

Hearing good music means a lightening of all the burdens of life. 
It means the acquiring of strength, of fortitude, of good cheer. It 
is also one of the great factors in making us a united people. When 
people learn to sing together, they learn to act as a community. This 
course will take up the inspiration of community singing; the ethical 
and educational influence of music; the organization of community 
sings, and the effort to make those national and world wide; programs 
outlined and material suggested. 



Admission Requirements. 



The present policy of the State Board of Education is to place 
entrance to all Normal School courses on a basis of high school grad- 
uation. 

To fulfill the entrance requirements of the junior year, gradua- 
tes of four-year high schools must have made during their high school 
course a minimum of thirty credits. These credits should include 
at least six (6J credits in English, three (3) of science, two (2) of 
Mathematics, and three (3) of History. The remaining sixteen (16) 
credits may be felected in any of the branches named above, or in 
language, music, drawing, manual training, domestic science, physical 
education, or commerce. 

By a credit is meant satisfactory work in a course for one semes- 
ter (seventeen to twenty weeks) the class meeting five forty-five 
minute periods per week. If the subject be science or manual work, 
this should be doubled to allow for laboratory or shop work. 

Twenty-three high school credits or approximately three years 
work is the minimum preparation required for registering for normal 
school work, but it Is recommended that all applicants for admission 

27 



complete the required high school credits before applying for en- 
trance at the Normal School. 

Hating of Holders of Certificates Who Become Candidates for Normal 
Schooflj Certificates 

While it is the policy of the State Normal Schools of Idaho 
to place all courses on a basis of graduation from an accredited high 
school, exceptions are made to meet special cases and to do justice 
to the claims of teachers of some experience. These are: 

1. All teachers who hold valid Third or Second Grade certifi- 
cates are admitted as candidates for normal school certificates on 
the basis of their preparation to do Normal school work. 

2. All teachers who hold valid First Grade County certificates 
and who give satisfactory evidence of successful experience in teach- 
ing may be admitted as candidates for First Grade Normal School 
certificates. 

3. All teachers who hold valid State certificates and who give 
satisfactory evidence of successful teaching experience for three years 
are admitted to classification as juniors with such advanced credit 
on their junior year's work as their previous preparation justifies. 

4. All teachers who hold valid State Life certificates and who 
give satisfactory evidence of successful experience in teaching for 
five years are admitted with provisional classification as seniors. 

■5. Candidates of mature years are admitted as candidates for 
certificates but the School reserves the right to pass upon the time 
required to prepare for such certificates. 
Rating of Holders of Certificates Who Become Candidates for the; 

Diploma. 

High school graduates who hold valid First Grade Certificates 
issued previous to June 1, 1914, shall receive such credit toward grad- 
uation from diploma courses as their previous work in the normal 
school justifies. 

High school graduates who hold valid First Grade certificates 
issued after June 1, 1914, shall be given senior classification in general 
diploma courses when they have satisfied the high school require- 
ments as stated above. 

The following plans are suggested as feasible for high school 
graduates desiring to complete a two-year normal school course; 
diproma, where ever used, means a life certificate. 

1. A high school graduate may earn the Normal School diploma 
by taking the complete course and doing the work in two years. 

2. A high school graduate may complete the course in two 
periods of attendance: — First, by doing one year's work at the Nor- 
mal for which a First Grade Normal Certificate will be granted; 
second, by returning after teaching 3 years, for the second year's 
work, at the end of which a diploma will be granted. 

3. A high school graduate may complete the course required 
for a Normal School diploma by entering at the beginning of the 

28 



I 



Summer School session, remaining thru the following school year and 
the following Summer session, thus making the equivalent of one and 
one-half years' work, for which a First Grade Normal School Certifi- 
cate will be granted. One then could teach thru the two following 
school years, returning each of the summers for the Summer quarter, 
and by so doing, earn the life diploma. This method enables one to ob- 
tain the diploma by losing only one year from actual teaching. 

4. A high school graduate may complete the course for a Nor- 
mal School diploma by attending a Summer session, for which a 
Third Grade Normal School Certificate will be received . by teaching 
the following year and attending the second Summer session, for which 
a Second Grade Normal School Certificate will be received; by teach- 
ing the following year a short term of seven months and returning 
to the Normal for practice work in a rural training center and com- 
pleting the work required for a First Grade Normal School Certificate 
at the third Summer school. By attending the next three Summer 
schools and by doing an extra quarter's work during the first or 
fourth quarter, the full course required for a diploma may be com- 
pleted with a loss of not more than four months from actual service 
in the schools of Idaho. 

These last two ways enable one to do continuous work toward the 
final goal of certification, the earning of a Normal School diploma 
or life certificate, with the minimum loss of time from actual service 
in teaching. 

Honorable Dismissal. 

A student desiring to enter from another school before com- 
pleting the work offered in that school should present a certificate of 
honorable dismissal from that school. 
Former Rating Recognized. 

Students from standardized institutions in other states who wish 
to enter this School, will receive the same rating they have in a normal 
school in the state from which they come. The suggestions which 
follow will be found of definite assistance to those who contemplate 
entering this School. 
Recognition of College Credits. 

College or university graduates or under-graduates will upon 
formal application be granted such advanced standing in this School 
as their credentials warrant. For the most part, all who have com- 
pleted ten credits or more of their under-graduate course, can com- 
plete course A-4 in one year by taking ten assigned credits in educa- 
tion. See pages 45 to 47. 
Application Blank for Advanced Standing. 

1. If you wish a statement of your rating in this School and 
an estimate of the time it will require to complete a given course on 
the basis of the work you have completed elsewhere, please submit a 
record of your work beyond the elementary school on the blank in- 
serted next to the back cover of this bulletin. It is best to have this 

29 



blank filled out and returned to us by the principal or registrar of the 
school or schools attended. 

2. When this blank is returned write to us and give us the 
following Information: (1) Are you interested in securing our diploma 
by your attendance now? If so, what department do you expect to 
enter? (2) Is your immediate purpose in coming here to secure a 
certificate? If so, what grade of certificate do you expect to work for? 
(3) If you have had experience in teaching, submit a statement of 
it. (4!) Enclose some evidence of your success in teaching. (5) What 
certificate, now in force, do you hold in Idaho? In any other state? 
(6) send credentials from the institution in which your training was 
received. 

3. As soon as you decide to enter here, write directly to the 
office of the President and ask for such information and assistance as 
you may need in making preliminary arrangements for your room and 
board while in Lewiston. See pages 16 to 21. 

Basis of Estimating Credits in This School. 

One credit equals work completed in a class meeting for 45 to 60 
minutes, four or five time a week for a semester, (or the equivalent): 
The laboratory period is a double period. Ten (10) credits is con- 
sidered a full year's work. 
Meaning of grades: 

S+ Above average. 

S Satisfactory. 

S — Below average. 

C Conditioned. 

I Incomplete. 

U Failure. 

X Dropped by permission. 
Students wishing a transcript of the record of the work they 
completed in this School, for the purpose of entering another school 
or for any other reasonable purpose, will find it to their advantage to 
accompany their request with the address of the school they expect 
to enter and have the record sent directly from this office to the office 
of such school. All schools prefer, and most institutions require, that 
this method of obtaining information concerning credit be followed. 

No charge is made for copies of student's records that are sent 
directly from this school to other institutions, but only one copy will 
be sent to the student, without charge. For additional copy sent to 
the student, a charge of $1.00 is made. This fee is to cover the cost 
of clerical work and should accompany the request of the student. 

Summary of Admission Requirements. Courses Offered, and 
Certification in The IJcwiston State Normal School. 

High School Preparation: Normal School Course: Certificate Granted 

4 years or its equivalent 1 year First Grade Normal School 

good for 3 years and not re- 
newable. 

30 



4 years or its equivalent 2 quarters Second Grade Normal School, 

good for 1 year and not re- 
newable. 

4' years or its equivalent 1! quarter Third Grade Normal School 

good for 1 year and not re- 
newable. 

4 years or its equivalent 2 years Diploma or Life Certificate 

4 years or its equivalent 3 years Diploma in two departments 

(selected) 

4 years or its equivalent 2 Vz to 3 years Specialist's diploma and cer- 
tificate to teach general sub- 
jects. 



Diplomas and Certificates. 



The Idaho State Normal Schools issue upon graduation, after the 
completion of a two-year course beyond high school graduation, a 
diploma which is a Ldfe Certificate in the State of Idaho. 

In addition to the Life Certificate the Normal Schools grant: 

A First Grade Certificate: A graduate of an accredited high school 
may obtain a First Grade Certificate by satisfactorily completing a 
one-year professional course for teachers; or, a high school graduate 
holding a Second Grade Normal School Certificate may obtain a First 
Grade Certificate by obtaining satisfactory standings on eighteen 
week's additional work in either of the State Normal Schools. This 
certificate is written for three years and is not renewable. 

In most cases candidates for First Grade Certificates are granted 
Probationary certificates instead of full-time certificates. These Pro- 
bationary certificates are exchangeable at the end of the first year 
of teaching for a full-time certificate with the dating of the original 
certificate, provided, evidence of satisfactory success in teaching be 
presented to the School issuing the certificate. 

A Second Grade Certificate: The holder of a Third Grade Cer- 
tificate who has taught successfully for at least 18 weeks, may obtain 
a Second Grade Certificate after having obtained satisfactory stand- 
ings in nine weeks' work in either of the State Normal Schools. This 
certificate is good for one year and is not renewable. 

A Third Grade Certificate: A graduate of an accredited high 
school may obtain a Third Grade Normal School Certificate by passing 
satisfactorily the examinations required for third grade certificates, 
and by obtaining satisfactory standings in nine weeks' work in either 
of the State Normal Schools. This certificate is good for one year 
and is not renewable. 

Notes: 

1. "High School graduates" as used above means those who 
have completed a four-year course in an accredited high school 
or the equivalent. Thirty high school credits are required for 
admission. 

31 



2. At least one-half of the work required to complete any 
of the above courses shall be completed in the institution granting 
the certificate or diploma. 

o. I'racti'^e teaching under tne supervision of the institution 
issuing the certilicate or diploma shall be a requirement in all 
the above courses, except 2nd and 3rd Grade Normal School Cer- 
tificates. 

The diploma issued upon the completion of one of the two-year 
courses is a special stamp of approval placed upon teachers as special- 
ists in a particular field; for example, general grade teachers (primary, 
intermediate or upper, juniot high school) rural, home economics, 
public school music, principals. In the one-year courses the Normal 
schools endeavor to give the students such general training as will 
qualify them to teach and will at the same time fulfill the require- 
ments of the junior year of the two-year course which they look for- 
ward to completing as soon as possible. This general training is 
specifically directed toward general grade teaching and teaching 
rural schools. 

In case of those whose previous training Is less than high school 
graduation the one-year professional course is essentially the same a» 
above However, holders of Second Grade Normal School certificates 
and holders of First Grade Normal School certificates, who are not 
high school graduates, shall satisfy high school graduation requirement 
before they enter upon their senior year's work in the professional 
school. 

"Made-Up" Work: In view of the fact that the Lewiston State 
Normal School has eliminated all senior high school work, not more 
than three semesters credits, or one and one-half units, of senior high 
school work can be secured in the Lewiston State Normal School, and 
it is not advisable to depend upon completing entrance requirements 
in this institution. A student entering the Normal School is expected 
to have completed four years of high school work. 

Candidates Registered for Normal School Certificates May 
Complete Course. 

Certificate courses may be completed under the provisions ob- 
taining when the candidates registered for such courses, provided 
candidates for First, Second or Third Grade Normal School Certifi- 
cates as granted previous to September, 1916, shall change the method 
of securing certificates In accordance with the present rules of cer- 
tification, provided that such concessions may be made to experienced 
teachers as will enable them to continue teaching. 

No charge Is made for the issuance of these certificates but in any 
case, when thru loss or accident, a duplicate certificate Is requested to 
be issued a fee of $1.00 will be charged. In the case of the Issuance 
of a duplicate of a diploma the fee of $1.00 will be charged. 

Application for a Normal School Certificate by students registered 

32 



[ 




SCHOOL GARDFJNS 

jixiou men scriooL work foil Belgian relief 



in the School the first semester, must be filed with the Recorder before 
the opening of the second semester. Those students who enter at the 
opening of the second semester, or later, must file their application 
for a certificate with the Recorder by the end of the first month fol- 
lowing their registration. 

This school follows the policy adopted by the state: First. In 
matters regulating those who are eligible to hold a certificate as set 
forth in the following statement taken from the laws of Idaho. 

• * • "After May 1, 1917, no person shall be granted a certificate 
who has not completed four (4) years of high school work or its 
equivalent; Provided: That this requirement shall not apply to anyone 
who has taught at least eight (8) school months before May 1, 1914, 
and Provided further: that the State Board of Education may make 
such temporary modifications of the requirements of this section as 
may be necessary to supply the schools with teachers." 

Second. In the number of certificates of the same grade that will 
be issued to any one person. 

Since this School has eliminated high school work there has been 
a very decided Increase in the number of certificates and diplomas 
granted. The following table shows the change during the period 
June, 1908, to the present time: 

Certificates Diplomas Total 

1908 26 9 35 

1909 32 17 49 

1910 39 25 64 

1911 45 38 83 

1912 112 43 155 

1913 117 45 162 

1914 174 58 232 

1915 284 66 350 

191.; 354 51 40S 

1917 (record incomplete because of the fire) 242 74 316 

1918 July 1 181 45 226 



THE TRAINING SCHOOLS. 

THE GRADED TRAINING SCHOOIj AT liEWISTON 

(Mr. Chessman, Principal.) 
Function. 

The function of the training school is to typify the proper proce- 
dure and equipment of a good elementary school, and to serve as a 
laboratory for the demonstration of principles and methods of teach- 
ing. The training school also offers to teachers-in-traln'ng, of ad- 
vanced standing, the opportunity for actual teaching under expert 
supervision and under conditions that approximate the conditions 
which they will meet in their later work as teachers. 



That the time spent in observation by the teachers-in-trainin^ 
may be of the greatest value to them, it follows that the teaching 
done in the training school must be of the highest possible order. To 
this end only the most competent supervisors and instructors of ex- 
perience are employed, and only students of advanced standing are 
allowed to teach, and then only under the direction, observation and 
criticism of the supervisors. 
Organization. 

That the condition under which this teaching is done may approx- 
imate as nearly as possible the actual conditions of public school 
teaching the endeavor has been made to effect an organization such 
as one would find in a town school of the best standing. This organ- 
ization is based primarily on the six and six plan, comprising the Pri- 
mary grades (grades 1-4), the Elementary grades (grades 5-6) and 
the Junior High School (grades 7-9). The work is departmental only 
in such special subjects as music, physical education, household and 
manual arts, and agriculture. All children, including the 7th, 8th and 
9th grades, are grouped under room-supervisors whose foremost con- 
sideration is the welfare of the children under their charge. 

A bulletin on the Course of Study in the training school is in 
preparation and when printed will be sent upon request. Addres-B 
the Office of the President. 
The Mothers' Club. 

This meets the third Tuesday in each month of the regular ses- 
sion. This club was organized primarily for the purpose of securing 
the closest cooperation between the home and the school, to establish 
right relations between parent and teacher, changing criticism to 
cooperation; and secondarily to give the student teachers an oppor- 
tunity to learn how to conduct such meetings. Any mother or teacher 
of the children in the training school is eligible to membership. At 
these meetings topics are discussed concering the management of 
the school and its curriculum; and particular problems pertaining 
to the work of each grade. Any suggestions from parents and teach- 
ers which promise greater efficiency in the school and a more com- 
plete cooperation between the school and the community, will be 
kindly received and duly considered. 

Rural Training Centers. 
Purpose. 

The first purpose in the operation of the rural training schools 
is to provide typical rural schools in representative rural communi- 
ties that will afford the best possible educational conditions to the 
children and patrons of these communities. 

The second purpose is to offer to those students who will teach 
in the rural schools, the opportunity to work out, under skilled super- 
vision, the better principles and more fruitful methods of class room 
practice, and to gain a conception of the organization of the ma- 
chinery of a school to meet the special needs of each community. 

34 



Oi-ganizatlon. 

The rural training schools are made as nearly typical as possible. 
They are in no sense "Model Schools." In each, instance the Normal 
School makes an arrangement with a rural school district board for 
the use of the school plant as a normal training center. 

During the past year six such centers have been maintained, 
varj'ing in distance from five to eighteen miles from Lewiston. The 
same number are planned for the coming year. 

Six students are sent to each of these centers each quarter of 
nine weeks. These students live in the community and devote their 
entire time to a study of the school and community problems. The 
students are encouraged to develop leadership of community activities; 
they observe the work of the school, they make a study of special rural 
school methods and gradually take over the work of instruction and 
management. Each school is in charge of a member of the Normal 
School faculty who is a skilled supervisor with special training and 
experience in rural school work. This supervisor also acts as dean 
of women to the students in her charge. 
Field Work. 

It is steadily becoming more apparent that the responsibility of 
the Normal School to the schools of the State does not end when the 
students are sent out with certificates to teach. It is the desire of 
the school to give every possible assistance to its students in adjust- 
ing methods and practice to immediate conditions. During the com- 
ing year it is planned to keep an experienced supervisor in the field 
who will visit the students during the first year in their own schools. 
This field worker will cooperate with County Superintendents- in help- 
ing the new teacher get hold of her community and school problems 
in a specific way and in working out fruitful ways of attacking these 
problems. 



35 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



COURSES IN OUTIjINE 

In order to meet the present demands in Idaho this school offers 
several types of courses for the training of teachera for rural, village 
and city schools in all grades up to the senior high school. In con- 
tent these courses consist of (1) courses for the instruction of stu- 
dents in subjects they may later be expected to teach; and (2) pro- 
fessional courses, dealing with theory and practice of teaching and 
leading to special certificates and life diplomas. 

The courses offered are as follows: 

1. For training teachers for general grade work from the pri- 
mary to the senior high school (A-1, A-2, A-4). 

2. For the training of teachers for the rural schools (A-1, A-8) 

3. For training principals for town and village schools (A-10). 

4. For the training of teachers of special subjects' (A-3, A-5, 
A-6, A-7). 

5. Certificate courses. 

6. Extension courses for teachers-in-service. 

1, GENERAL COURSES. 

The admission requirements to all two-year courses leading to 
graduation is the completion of four years of high school work or 
its equivalent, that is, thirty credits above graduation from the eighth 
grade. 

Students presenting certificates from standard High Schools will 
not be required to pass entrance examinations other than to satisfy 
the School of their ability to use written and oral English and to 
write legibly. 

The General Course for the Training of Grade Teachers forms 
the basis of the courses known as: 

Primary Teachers' Course, (2 years) designated as Course A-2. 
Rural Teachers' Course (2 years), Designated as Course A-9. 
Course for Students who enter with Advanced Standing, 

Designated as Course A-4. 

Electlves in the special departments of manual training (A-5) 
and applied arts (A-6), tine arts (A-6), public school music (A-7), 
or physical education (A-8), may be combined with the General 
Course (A-1). Students interested are referred to page 39 of this 
catalog. 

36 



SUGGKSTIVK OrTT>[NE of the GENKHAL COURSK (A-1) 
lor the Training of Grade Teachers. 
JUNIOR YEAR. 



First Quarter 

Psychology and Observation 
General Agriculture 
A "Subject Matter" Course 
General Biological Principles 
Physical Education, 2 days 
Penmanship, ;> days. 

Second Quarter 

Psychology and Observation 
General Agriculture 
General Biological Principles 
A "Subject Matter" Course 
One Assigned Elective. 



Third Quarter. 

Social Aspects of Education 
A "Subject Matter" Course 
Rural Sociology 
Two Assigned Electives. 



Fourth Quarter. 

Social Aspects of Education 

A "Subject Matter" Course 

Apprentice Work (Assisting) 

Sociology 

One Assigned Elective. 



SENIOR YEAR. 



First Quarter 

Practice Teaching, % hour 
History of Education 
Plays and Games 
Two Assigned Electives. 

Second Quarter 

Practice Teaching, % hour 
History of Education 
Three Assigned Electives. 



Third Quarter 

Practice Teaching, 1 hour 
Principles of Education 
Child Growth and Education 
Two Assigned Electives. 

Fourth Quarter 

Practice Teaching, 1 % hours 
Principles of Education 
The Function of Special Sub- 
jects 
Two Assigned Electives. 



SUGGESTIVE ELECTIVES FOR JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL COURSE. 



Mathematics. Science, etc., for 



Junior High School Methods. 
Courses in English, History, 

J. H. S. Teachers. 
Vocational Guidance. 
General Sewing. 
General Cookery. 

SUGGESTIVE ELECTIVES FOR ELEMENTARY 
GRADE TEACHERS 

Music, Applied Arts, English Courses. 

Subject Matter Courses for Elementary Grades. 

It is recommended that students specializing in any department 
take some work in other departments, e. g.. Junior High School Spe- 
cialists should do some work in primary and intermediate grade 
work; Primary Specialists in intermediate or upper grades; Inter- 
mediate Specialists in lower or upper grades. 



37 



SUGGtEBTlVE OUTLINE OF THE PRIMARY COURSE (A-2) 



Junior Year. 



First Quarter. 

Primary Methods (*) 
Psychology and Observation (*) 
General A.rt 
History Stories 
Penmanship or Elective. 

Second Quarter. 

Primary Methods 
Psycholog-y and Observation (**) 
General Methods 
Written English 
Literature for Primary Grades 
(*) 



Third Quarter. 

Observation in Primary Grades 
General Biological Principlc3(*) 
Sight Singing or Elective 
Geography for Primary Grades 
Fruit Growing. 

Fourth Quarter. 

Teaching and Criticism in Pri- 
mary Grades. 

General Biological Principles 

Vegetable Gardening 

Arithmetic for Elementary 
Grades. 

Primary Songs. 



Senior Year. 



First Quarter. 

Teaching and Criticism in Pri- 
mary Grades (***) 

Industrial Art for the Primary 
Grades 

History of Idaho 

Elementary Sewing 

Elective. 

Second Quarter. 

Practice Teaching and Criticism 

in Primary Grades 
Social Aspects of Education. 
Elementary Science 
Oral English or Elective 
Home Economics — Elective. 



Third Quarter. 

Teaching and Criticism in Pri- 
mary Grades 
Principles of Education (*) 
Elementary Sev/ing 
Child Growth and Education 
Plays and Games 
Home Economics — Cookery. 

Fourth Quarter. 

Teaching and Criticism in Pri- 
mary Grades 
Principles of Education 
Physical Education 
Electives. 



( "■' ) Semester subjects. 

(.**) Supervised observation. 

(***) Four quarters of teaching in the primary department 



required. 



2. SUGGESTIVIC OUTLINE FOR THE TWO-YEIAR RURAL 
TEACHERS' COURSE 

for graduates of four-year high schools. 



Junior Year. 



I^st Quarter. 

Psychology and Observation 
General Biological Principles 
General Agriculture 
A Subject Matter Course, e. g., 
a teacher's course in English, 
history, geography, arithme- 
tic, etc. 
Music for Ilural Teachers 
Physical Education (3 days). 



Third Quarter. 

Social Aspects oi Education 

Subject Matter Course 

Woodwork 

Three Assigned Electives, 



38 



Second Quarter. Fourth Quarter. 

Psychology and Oibservation Social Aspects of Education 

General Biological Principles Rural Methods 

Agriculture Handwork for Rural Teachers 

Subject Matter Course One Assigned Elective 

Drawing and Art for Rural Penmanship 

Schools Health and Education (2 days). 
Physical Education (3 days). 

Senior Year. 
First Quarter. Third Quarter. 

Special Methods. Observation, Principles of Education 

Teaching and Criticism in History of Education 

Rural Training Center. Three Assigned Electives. 

Second Quarter. Fourth Quarter. 

Rural Social Course, e. g., Rural Principles of Education 

Economics Rural Sociology 

Rural Primary Methods Three Assigned Electives. 

Rural School Management and 
Organization 

Library Course for Rural Teach- 
ers 

One Assigned Elective. 

3. TOWN AND VIIiLiAGE PRINCIPALS' COURSE. 

This course is for the most part an adaptation of the work of 
the General Course to meet the special needs of the type of teacher 
named. Two-year courses for principals are essentially Uie same as 
that outlined for the training of teachers for grade schools excepting 
in the matter of electives. Students in their election of work aro 
advised to select such courses as their individual needs require to 
make them effective and efficient teachers in the administrative field. 
This course entitles the graduate to receive a special certificate called 
Principal's Diploma. 

4. COURSES FOR SPECIAL SUBJECTS. 

A high school graduate who wishes to specialize in any subject 
may enter upon the work of the special department after completing 
a two-year course which combines general grade teaching and some 
special training in the chosen field. Such selection of work may be 
made as will enable all who complete the above two-year courses to 
be recommended for graduation from the General Course. Those 
who wish to specialize fully may by completing- a third year's work, 
in which the emphasis is in the special field, receive a specialist's 
diploma in addition to their general diploma. The Specialists' 
Courses offered are Home Economics, Manual Training and Applied 
Arts, Fine Arts, Public School Music, and Physical Education, 

Home Economics. Home Economics may be combined to ad- 
vantage with science, art, vocational work, or with one of the regular 
subjects in the junior high school. The demand for special teachers 
of home economics who are prepared to do some other line of school 

3» 



work is increasing every year and, altho high school graduates may 
enter and take two years of special training in home economics, thus 
obtaining a Home Economics certificate alone, the School advises 
those who wish to become specialists in home economics to follow a 
plan similar to the one suggested in the preceding paragraph for 
those interested in the other special department, namely: to precede 
their highly specialized work in home economics by preparation for 
general teaching. 

Such a course would require three years for its completion but it 
could be so arranged that the candidate could secure the general 
diploma at the end of the second year of work; then, after a year of 
teaching, return for the third year of work in which the emphasis 
would be on home economics. Upon the completion of the third 
year of work a specialist's diploma would be granted in home eco- 
nomics. 

The following is suggestive of the relative emphasis given to 
home economics in the field two years of this three-year course: 

Education 4 credits 

Teachers' Courses 3 ci edits 

Practice Teaching 3 credits 

Assigned Electives — 

In the general field 3 credits 

In home economics 3 credits 

Beginners' Courses in Art, Music, etc 2 credits 

Free Electives 2 credits 

SUGGESTIVE OUTLINE OF SPECIALISTS' COURSE IN 
HOME ECONOMICa 
Junior Ycat'. 
Psychology and Observation General Art 

English General Biological Principles 

General Chemistry Organic Chemistry 

Elementary Sewing Food Analysis 

Food Products Elementary Cookery 

Laundering Methods in Home Economics 

Physiology Elementary Sewing 

senior Year. 
Bacteriology Physiological Chemistry 

Teaching in Home Economics Dietetics 

Advanced Cookery Hygiene and Sanitation 

Dressmaking Dressmaking 

Sociology Teaching in Home Economics 

Home Nursing Textiles 

House Decoration and Design 

All students desiring a specialist's certificate in Home Economics 
are requested to arrange their course with the Head of the Depart- 
ment before registering. 

College Stiul^'nts Course, or Course for Students who enter with Ad- 
vanced Standing. 
The actual time required for any student entering here from a 

40 



college or other standardized institution to complete this course is 
determined by the record submitted to this office and the candidate's 
ability to qualify for teaching. For the most part, all who have com- 
pleted ten (10) or more cerdits in professional or subject matter 
courses which are transferable can complete the general course in 
one year. The worli from quarter to quarter shall consist of work in 
education and assigned electives which will best round out their 
preparation for the kind of work they expect to do. Such students 
shall satisfy the School that they are prepared to do the work of the 
regular classes in the course for which they register. Th«y are en- 
titled to provisional classification as seniors until such time as their 
previous records have been passed on by the Recorder. A satisfactory- 
rating by the Recorder plus sufficient practice teaching entitles them 
to become candidates for the diploma and regular members of the 
graduation class. 

5. CERTIFICATE COURSES 
Course for Third Grade Normal School Certificate. 

This course has the same requirements as the Third Grade 
County Certificate, both in subjects to be taken and in th« examina- 
tions to be passed. 

Candidates for Third Grade Certificates must have attended sum- 
mer school for at least nine weeks and must have completed four 
years of high school work, or its equivalent. Evidence shall be sub- 
mitted showing that this requirement is met before registration. See- 
blank for high school standing attached at the end of this catalog. 

Candidates for Third Grade Certificates are expected to pass the 
entrance examinations on the subject matter of the legal branches: 
orthoepy, spelling, reading, penmanship, arithmetic, elementary com- 
position, grammar, geography, history of the United States, the civil 
government of the United States, and of the State of Idaho, physiology 
and hygiene with special reference to the effects of stimulants and 
narcotics upon the human system, school law, the manual of the 
elementary course of study for the common schools of Idaho, and 
the elements of agriculture. If the applicant desires to raise his 
grade in any subject, or to pass in any subject from which he may 
have been excused at the preliminary examination, he may do so at 
any regular examination. 

Every applicant for a Third Grade Certificate, in addition to at- 
tendance at a professional school for teachers for at least nine weeks, 
shall have received satisfactory standings in: Methods of teaching 
Arithmetic; School Management; Methods of teaching Reading and 
Language; Methods of teaching Geography; School Laws of Idaho. 
The summer school standing will be accepted in lieu of any examina- 
tion in (a) Manual of Course of Study, (b) Agriculture, (c) Idaho 
Civics. Candidates will qualify both in the examination in subject 

41 



matter and in the methods courses. All such applicants shall also do 
the required work in the practice school. 

Suggestive Coui*se lor Second Grade Normal School Certificate. 

Preferably one quarter's practice teaching in a rural trainingr 
center 

OR 

Rural Life and the Rural School. 

One Assigned Subject Matter Course: Music, Penmanship, Art 
Handwork, etc. 

Agriculture, or Manual Training, or Rural Home Economics. 

Apprentice Work and Observation in local Training School. 

Suggestive Course for First Grade Normal School Certificate. 
First Quarter Second Quarter. 

Psychology and Observation Psychology and Observation 

General Agriculture A Subject Matter Course, e.g. a 
Art for Rural Teachers (2 days) teacher's course in history, 

Music for Rural Teachers (3 geography, arithmetic, etc. 

days) Rural Home Economics (2 days) 

Rural Social Course, e.g., Rural Rural Applied Arts (3 days) 

Sociology 1 Assigned Elective. 
Physical Education (2 days) 
Penmanship (3 days). 

Third Quarter. Fourth Quarter. 

Rural Social Course Special Methods, Observation 

Subject Matter Course Teaching and Criticism in 

Rural Methods Rural Training Center. 
2 Assigned Electives 

The above course has in mind the inclusion of various elements 
which experience has shown should enter into the preparation of a 
teacher in so far as this can be accomplished in one year. Such ^ 
modifications and substitutions will be made in the program as the 
best interests of the student and the work for which he is preparing 
demands. The quarter's work at a Rural Training Center includes 
both practice teaching and further work in teaching preparation. 
The practice teaching may be done i nthe city training school when 
so assigned to prepare students for a particular grade position. 

6. EXTENSION COURSES FOR TEACHERS-IN-SERVICE. 

This work so far consists of giving aid in books and suggestions 
to those who wish to study at home. Such work has not yet been 
put on a credit basis, but help is willingly offered. 
Six Weeks Courses. 

Any student may take work in the Summer Session and receive 
the same permanent credit for it as would be received for the same 
work if completed in any quarter of the regular session. The desire 
on the part of the school to provide opportunities for those who wish 
to obtain county and state certificates, or who wish to renew them 
by taking advantage of the provisions of the State Law with respect 

42 



to professional training, led to the establishment of one special six 
weeks course. This is offered during the Summer quarter. Studenta 
desiring to begin teaching after short preparation during the year, 
may, when there is sufficient demand, elect the Third Grade Normal 
Certificate course. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION BY DEPARTMENTS. 

DEPARTMENT OF AGKICUIiTUIlE. 

Mr. Combs. 
Course 1. Rural Science, (l Quarter). Offered each quarter. 

A study of science and its relation to the factors in every day 
life. The problems of light and heat as factors in plant growth, 
"Weather, seasons and climate as related to agriculture, bacteria and 
its relation to the soil. Applied farm mechanics. Farm sanitation. 
Food and nutrition. 

These topics will be taken up in as far as they are practical for 
the rural teacher. 

Course 2. General Agricultui-e. (2 Quarters). Offered 1st and 2nd 
semesters. 

A course in which a general survey of the whole field of agricul- 
ture is taken. This course deals with the fundamental principles of 
agriculture and general practice in crop production, farm animals, 
fruit growing , gardening and soils. Lectures, recitations, laboratory 
periods and field trips thruout this course. 
Course 3. Animal Husbandry. (1 Quarter). Offered 1st quarter. 

A study of the breeds of farm animals. Attention is given to the 
principles of feeding, beef cattle, dairy cattle, horses and other farm 
animals. Practical work in scoring of farm animals and balancing of 
rations. 

Course 4, Field CIrops. (1 Quarter). Offered 1st quarter. 

A study of field crop classification, the growth of plants, including 
seed and its germination, function of leaves and roots and seed pro- 
duction. Corn, wheat, oats, barley, rye, flax, legumen, root crops, 
crop rotation and weeds are emphasized. 

Course 5. Soils and Soil Fertility. (1 Quarter). Offered 2nd quarter. 

A study of the origin, classification, composition, physical con- 
dition and general treatment of soils and the scientific basis of tillage 
to maintain soils in the highest state of fertility. Much attention is 

43 



given to the auestion of how to keep soils productive and how to keep 

soil in a high state of production. 

Course 6. Dairying-. (1 Quarter). Ottered 2nd quarter. 

A brief course in the composition of milk and milk products, th© 
use of cream separator, Babcock milk tester, the handling of tream 
and the manufacturing of butter on tlie farm. Instruction will also 
be given in the care and feeding of dairy cattle and raising of dairy 
calves. 
Course 7. Poultry Keeping, (i Quarter.) Offered 3rd quarter. 

The economic importance of poultry, egg production, grading and 
marketing of poultry products, feeding and housing of poultry. Types 
and breeds. Practical work in scoring and incubation. The school is 
v;ell provided with good poultry equipment. 

Course 8. Fruit Growing-. (1 Quarter). Offered 3rd quarter. 

A study of the essential elements in soils for different fruits, the 
locations of sites, marketing, making of sprays, pruning, budding, 
grafting. The nearness of orchards and fruit gardens to the Campus 
permits of practical work. 

Course 9. Vegetable Gardening. (1 Quarter). Offered 4th quarter. 

Principles and practice in growing vegetables. Special attention 
is given to the home and school garden. Emphasis on soils, fertilizers, 
seed testing, insecticides. Garden club problems and plans of organi- 
zation and management of boys' and girls' clubs are taken up. 
Practical work in the school garden required. 

Course 10. Floriculture and L/andscape Gardening. (1 Quarter). Of- 
fered 4th quarter. 

Beautification of hom.e and school grounds is the central theme 
of the course. Hardy flowers, shrubs, shade trees and their culture, 
also the principles of laying out home grounds most attractively will 
be included in the study. 



44 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION. 

Mr. Elliott, Mr. Millay, Mr. Wiilson, Miss Wiseman. 

Course 1. Psychology and Observation. (2 Quarters). Offered eax^h 

semester. 

A study of iho fundamental factors and processes in the psy- 
chology of learning. Cases found both in and out of school life ana- 
lyzed to familiarize student with the method of learning-, and make him 
sensitive to symptoms of mental activity and retardation. The result 
aimed at is a scientific attitude toward teaching and the beginnlngm 
of rationalized skill in school procedure. Frequent visits to classes 
where teaching is going on will be made, in order to get cases tor 
analysis and illustration. Psychological theory is to grow up out of 
and in the midst of practice. 

Course 2. General Biological PHnciples. (2 Quarters). Offered each 

semester. 

Designed to give the student: (1) a general conception of the 
fundamental laws and principles upon which biological development 
depends; (2) the biological foundations for diagnosing educational 
and social problems and working out moral and religious elements of 
human life will be considered. 

Course 3. Social Aspects of Education. (2 Quarters). Offered once 
during th3 year. 

The more important epochs of educational history with special 
ememphasis on their social interpretation with its lessons for the pres- 
ent and further development of education. School materials and 
activities and ideals seen as tools for accomplishing specific results. 

Course 5. Principles of Education. (2 Quarters). Offered once during 
the year. 

Basal necessity of education; its aim; correlative nature of edu- 
cation for social efficiency and education as self -development; native 
tendencies as the materials of education; the principles of selection 
of subject matter, and conditions without which subject matter select- 
ed may not become genuine information to the students who are 
attacking it; these and similar problems intended to help the student 
teachers begin constructive thinking and modify our methods of in- 
struction and materials of education into such practices as will be in 
conformity with out best educational ideals and professions. 

Course 6. Sociology, Social Origin and Social Organization. (1 

Quarter). Offered twice during the year. 

Intended to induct students into the analysis of social structures 
and their functions as social processes, thus enabling them to parti- 
cipate effectively In the intelligent attack on social problems, and to 

4S 



support those elements and processes which are making for social 
welfare. 

Course 7. Rural Sociology. (1 Quarter). Offered twice during the 

year. 

A consideration of the xsccial conditions of rural communities, 
together with the forces of improvement and the direction the action 
must take. 

Course 8. Rural Econoniics. (1 Quarter) 

Fundamental principles of economics. Principles applied to pro- 
blems of production, distribution and consumption in rural com- 
munities with special reference to economic conditions in Idaho and 
the Northwest. 

Course 9. School Management and School I*aw. (1 Quarter). 

The problem of rural school room administration with special 
emphasis on the daily program. A presentation of the general and 
specific provisions of Idaho school laws and a comparison of Idaho 
laws with similar provisions in other states. 

Course 10. General Methods.. (1 Quarter). Offered twice during the 

year. 

A discussion of the common principles and methods of procedure 
of teaching the common branches. 

Course 11. Rural Vocational Oourse. (1 Quarter). Offered each 

quarter. 

A practical and concrete course malting the needs of the farm 
home the basis of all occupational work suitable for seventh and 
eighth grades under rural school conditions. Possibilities of home 
projects, boys' and girls, agricultural, home economic and farm 
handicraft clubs as educational agencies under the direction of the 
school. The development of a real farm culture and the respon- 
sibility of the rural schools toward that end. 

Course 12.. Rural Methods. (1 Quarter). Offered each quarter. 

This course will precede the work in practice teaching in the 
rural training centers. A study of thie best methods of teaching the 
common school subjects under rural school conditions. Economy 
of time, application of the principles of education, adoption of the 
Idaho Course of Study and text books to meet rural community needs 
and the socialization of all school subjects will be emphasized. 

Course 13. School Administration. (2 Quarters). Offered once dur- 
ing the year. 

This Is a course offered for those who are making special prepar- 
ation for administrative positions. The first quarter's work deals 
with problems of administration and the work of the second quarter 
emphasizes problems of supervision. 

46 



Course 14. Introductory Education.. (1 Quarter). 

An orienting course in education aiming primarily to fulfill a 
"guidance" function. The various types of teaching made clear. 
Specific qualities essential to success in each type of worlc. 

Course 15. Cliild Growth and Education (1 Quarter). Offered once 
during the year. 

A survey of the processes of mental and physical growth with 
special reference to their interrelationship in normal development. 
A consideration of some of the disorders of growth, both mental and 
physical, including nervousness, retardation, mental defect, etc. 
School materials and processes seen as factors of growth and retarda- 
tion. 
Course 16. Tlie Function of Special Subjects (1 Quarter. Offered 

once during the year. 

Intended to make the connection between educational theory and 
the teaching process. Answers the question, "How can the various 
elementary school subjects be used as educative materials?" 

DEPARTMENT QF ENGLISH. 

Mr. Fowler. 
The courses of this department .'ire intended to aid students in 
acquiring habits of vigorous, clear and correct speech and writing; 
to give them a keener understanding and appreciation of literature, 
and to prepare them to teach English subjects with pleasure and 
with skill. 

Course 1. Survey of English. (1 Quarter). Offered 1st quarter. 

This course is designed for all entering students who intend to 
qualify for practice teaching. The purpose of the work is to discover 
the nature of each student's English preparation and to advise him 
accordingly in regard to the pursuit of further English studies. 
Course 2. Written English. (1 Quarter). Offered each quarter. 

A mastery of the principles and habits of correct and effective 
writing. Continuous practice in writing, together with helpful criti- 
cism. 

Cousre 3. Oral English. (1 Quarter). Offered each quarter. 

Develops logical and orderly thinking, with correct and forceful 
oral expression. The student begins with brief talks from notes. 
Toward the end of the quarter he speaks extemporaneously. Per- 
sonal interests, current events, and professional problems typify the 
subject-matter of this course. 
Course 4. Juvenile literature. (1 Quarter). Offered twice duringr 

the year. 

(For intermediate and junior high school grades). 

The study of children's interests in literature; wide reading of 

47 



children's books; practice in reading and story-telling; the school 
library. 

Course 5. Sentence Structure. (1 Quarter). Offered twice during th« 

year. 

Those whose understanding of English grammar is insufficient 
for teaching, have here an opportunity to study the sentence in Its 
various aspects, with a view of teaching grammar. Emphasis is 
upon analysis and synthesis of the sentence. 

Course 6. English Literature, (l Quarter). Offered twice during th& 

year. 

Extends the students' acquaintance with the best Einglish, works; 
freshens his interest in the subject; gives him a basis for good judg- 
ment in his own reading as well as in that of his pupils. Especial 
attention is given to the literature of the last decade. 

Course 7. American Liiterature. (l Quarter). Offered twice during the 
year. 

Acquaintance with our national literature. This course is of- 
fered largely as a background for the teaching of reading and litera- 
ture in the grades. 

Course 8. Word Study. (1 Quarter), Offered twice during the year. 
Spelling, pronunciation, enunciation, meaning, derivation, and use 
of words in sentences, are matters considered in this course. The 
aims are to make students better spellers, to give them a wider work- 
ing vocabulary, and to discuss methods for teaching the subject in the 
elementary school. 

Course 9. L/anguage for Teachers. (1 Quarter). Offe!red 1st and 3rd 

quarters. 

This course emphasizes the study of problems involved in train- 
ing pupils to speak and write better English; ways and means of 
teaching composition, grammar and word-study in the elementary 
and upper grades are investigated. 

Course 10. Reading for Teachers. (1 Quarter). Offered 2nd and 4th 

quarters. 

Methods of teaching reading and literature in the intermediate 
and upper grades. Features of the work are: — ways of improving 
voice qualiyt; exercise in pronunciation and enunciation; ways of con- 
ducting recitations; practice in reading. 

DEPART^TENT Or^ FINE AND APPLIED ARTS. 

Miss McGahey, Miss Mann. 
Course 1. General Art. (1 Quarter). 

Drawing and design: a practical study of free hand drawing and 
the principles of design, line harmony, dark and light and color. 

48 



i 



<ll 



Course 2. Rural Art. (1 Quarter). 

Drawing and design, with practical application made wh.ich the- 
rural teacher may use under conditions existing in rural schools. 

Course 3. Advanced Fine Arts. (1 Quarter). 

A further study of design and its application in tone, harmonies, 
balance, relation of light and dark, tone values and color harmony. 

Course 4. Hand Work for Rural Teachers.. (1 Quarter). 

Various kinds of handwork from the standpoint of the rural 
school. The use of materials easy to obtain and requiring minimum 
of equipment and supervision. The enriching of the regular school 
curriculum thru manual arts. 

Course 5. Industrial Arts for Primary Teachers. (1 Quarter). 

A course designed to develop possibilities of hand work in the 
primary grades. Sand table work, booklets and other illustrative 
work will be done; also some general constructive work, as weaving 
and clay work, with their industrial significance. 

Course 6. Advance Applied Arts. (1 Quarter). 

A course designed to give further experience, in different kinds 
of hand work. Kinds of material used will be determined by needs 
of the class and economic conditions. 

Course 7. Costume Design and Home Decoration. (1 Quarter). 

A practical course in planning for costumes and home surround- 
ings with adaptations of principles of design to every day use. 

Course 8. Woodwork for Beginners.. (1 Quarter). 

Use of common tools; making of a few projects; working draw- 
ing of at least one project; recognition of a few physical characteris- 
tics of w^ood; simple staining and finishing; suggestions as to plans- 
and organization. 

Course 9. Wood Work. (1 Quarter). 

Further use of tools; particularly the chisel; drawing and mak- 
ing projects involving use of simple common joints; the uses and 
characteristics of wood, and industrial significance. 

Course 10. Rural Woodwork, (l Quarter). Offered each quarter. 

Use of a few common tools; making of a few articles for practical 
use. Comparisons and notes on difficulties involved; making a 
working drawing of at least one project; simple staining and finishing; 
suggestions as to equipment and place in the program. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY. 

Mr. Chessman. 
Geography for Teachers. 

Review of the fundamentals in the text and methods for teaching! 

4d 



these. Minimum essentials. Methods of drill. Correlation. Use 
of the text and supplementary readers. 

Advance Geography. 

Relation of geography to current events. A definite survey of 
world's resources as related to needs of the war. 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND CIVICS. 

Mr. Talkington, Mrs. Blomquisc. 
Course 1. History Stories for the Primarj' Grade.. (1 Quarter). 

Offered 1st and 3rd quarters. 

Indian: Indian myths; food, clohting, and shelter; snares, traps, 
implements and utensils; peace pipe and methods of warfare; caro 
and training of children; travel by water and by land; the potlatch 
and the medicine man. 

Pastoral and Pioneer: Domestic animals and their use; manner 
of cultivating, harvesting and threshing grain; social conditions, 
games and sports, religious customs; house and household furniture; 
methods of travel. 

Course 2. The Origin of European Nations — An American Back- 
ground.. (1 Quarter). Offered 2nd and 4th quarters. 
The object of the course is to show the origin of American in- 
stitutions as is found in the Old World from the study of the Feudal 
system, the Church, the monastery, the guilds and trade routes; the 
monastic and palace schools; the manor and the mark; the crusades; 
and inventions and discoveries. 

Course 3. The Formation of Nations in America — Spanish, French, 
English, American or United States. (1 Quarter). Offered 1st 
and 3rd quarters. 

The course is largely biographical and geographical, in which 
the lives of the men who established the claims of their nations to 
particular sections of the western continent, are treated. 

Course 4. American Farm Life, (l Quarter). Otffered 2nd quarter. 

The history of the United States until the close of the "Recon- 
struction" period is largely rural. The course includes the study of 
the public lands; westward immigration; naturalization; opening up 
of new farms; the growth of slavery and cotton growing; inventions 
and manufacturies; agriculture; the Civil War; the improvements of 
farm life. 
Course 5. National Expansion. (1 Quarter). Offered 4th quarter. 

The period of United States history since the Civil War has been 
one of expansion: industrial and financial; reclamation and conser- 
vation; science and education; improvement of social and foreign 
conditions. Such questions will be considered from source materials. 

50 



Course 6. Pacific Coast History.. (1 Quarter). Offered 1st and Srd 

quarters. 

The object is to supplement the material found in the average 
text on this subject. Discovery; exploration; settlement; political 
and industrial development; growth of churches and schools; rela- 
tions to Spanish possessions on the South and British on the North; 
final separation into states; and the growth of the Pacific Coast 
States and possessions. 
Course 7. History of Idaho.. (1 Quarter). Offered 2nd and 4th 

quarters. 

The purpose is to present the leading facts in the State's history, 
using the following and other topics: the mining era; the organiza- 
tion of the territory; Indian wars; the admission of the State, ana 
the development of State institutions; the timber resources; reclama- 
tion; stock raising; and various phases of industrial life peculiar to 
this State. 

This includes the races of people; classes of society; forms of 
government; school and church; industrial and social conditions of 
the common people; how the rulers involve their nations in war; the 
lack of the voice of the common people in making war or peace. 

Course 9. Oi^dcs and Social Science. (State). (1 Quarter). Offered 

1st and Srd quarters. 

The government of Idaho consists of the following political units: 
the family; the school; the precinct; the city; the county; the state- 
Each of these has a government provided for it which should be 
administered for the community as a whole, and the object of the 
course is to show how this is done. 

Course 10. Current History. (1 Quarter). Offered 1st and Srd 
quarters. 

This course includes the study of the magazines, newspapers and 
reports of various kinds which show how the various industrial 
political and social problems of life are being solved; to correlate the 
history learned from books with that found in actual life; to awaken 
an interest in present day subjects; to keep in touch with the progress 
of the war and the measures for its support. 

Course 11. History and Civics for GDeachers. (1 Quarter). Offered 
1st and Srd quarters. 

"Materials of History," the elements of which it is composed.. 
The organization of these materials. The adaptation of these mater- 
ials to the different kinds and grades of work. Methods of presenta- 
tion. A proper understanding of the term "civics." "Type" lessons 
on state, county and community civics showing kinds of materials 
used and methods of presentation. 

SI 



DEPARTMENT OF HOME EOONOAnCS. 

Miss Fauble, Miss McCollister 

Course 1. Food Products. (1^^ Quarters). Offered 1st semester. 

The source, manufacture and preparation of food products, with 
conditions and laws regulating- the same. Introductory to laboratory 
work in cookery. 

Course 2. Laundering;. (^ Quarter). Offered 2nd quarter. 

A study of the development of laundry work, cleansing agents, 
methods of cleansing different fabrics, stain removal, dry cleaning. 

Course 3. Elementary Cookery. (2 Quarters). Junior year — 2nd 

semester. 

Laboratory work designed to give a practical working knowledge 

of the general principles of cookery. Note books required. 

Course 4. Advanced Cookery and Table Service. (2 Quarters). Senior 

year — 1st semester. 

A course for the development of skill in the technique of cooking. 
Preparation and service of luncheons and dinners for varying num- 
bers at limited expense. 

Course 5. Home Nursing;. (1 Quarter). Senior year — 2nd semester. 
Care of the sick under home conditions. Observation of symp- 
toms and administration of medicine. Preparation and service of 
foods for the invalid. 

Course 6. Dietetics.. (1 Quarter). Offered 4th quarter. 

A study of food materials in daily dietaries of families under 
various conditions. Influence of conditions upon food requirments. 
Computing, preparing and serving dietaries of specified cost furnish- 
ing specific nutrients. Diets in the common nutritional diseases. 
Course 7. Food Conservation. (1 Quarter). Offered every quarter. 

A general survey of the world's food problems. The effect of 
war on the food of all nations and the necessity for food control. A 
development of the nutritional aspects with practical laboratory ap- 
plication of principles involved. 
Course 8. Elementary Sewing:. (4 quarters). 

The fundamental principles of hand and machine sewing applied 
to undergarments, household linens and simple dresses. Drafting 
patterns, care of clothing, darning and patching, are essential feature* 
of the course. Art needlework is included when applicable. 
Course 9. Dressmaldng. (3 Quarters). Offered 1st, 2nd and 4th 

quarters. 

A development of Course 8, giving the fundamental principles of 
dressmaking and tailoring. Drafting and adjusting of commercial 
patterns to measurements for use in making dresses and suits of cot- 

52 



ton, silk and wool. Materials and their influence on the design o^ 
garments. Color combinations, economical purchasing and other 
problems relating- to dress are considered. 

Course 10. General Sewing'. (L Quarter). Offered 4th quarter. 

An abridged couxse arranged for students having a knowledge of 
plain sewing. The construction of garments with discussion of fabrics 
according to use, quality and cost. 

Course 11. Textiles.. Senior year. Offered 3rd quarter. 

Their production and manufacture; the identification of various 
fibres and of their substitutes and adulterations by means of physical 
microscopic and chemical tests. The effect of dyes upon textiles and 
their relation to laundry problems. A study of the hygiene of cloth- 
ing, economic conditions and social aspects, relating to textile manu- 
facturing. 

(Course 12. Rural Home Keonomics. (2 Quarters). Offered each 

semester. 

The preparation of food and the adaptability of textiles to the 
needs of the human race. The course in cookery aims to carry the 
theory and practice along parallel lines. 

Instruction in First Aid, home nursing and the recognition of so- 
called "children's diseases" will be given. 

The sewang plans to include such problems as will meet the 
needs and utilize the resources of the rural teacher, enabling her to 
organize sewing clubs, Red Cross auxiliaries, etc. 
LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

Miss Crawford, Mrs. Hibbard. 
liibrary Methods. (1 Quarter). Offered for 3 quarters. 

Use of libraries. 

Classification, use of reference books, card catalog, periodicals 
and periodical indexes, bibliographies. 

Library In the School. 

School library room, book selection, book buying and ordering. 

Organization. 

Routine, supplies, binding and mending, classification, accession- 
ing, charging system. 

Administration. 

Service, reports, teaching the u.'^e of the library. 

l>EPARTaiENT OF MATHEMATICS. 

Mr. Chessman. 
Course 1. Applied Arithmetic, (l Quarter). 

A general review course In subject matter. Drill work on fun- 
damental operations. Much problem work, emphasis on farm prob- 

5S 



lems — buying, selling, commissions, insurance, taxes, notes, mort- 
gages, depreciation; measurement, value of crops, land, etc.; construc- 
tion problems — wood, cement; mechanics — lever, pulleys, horse power, 
inclined plane, good roads, gasoline engine; constituents (percent- 
ages), fodder, soils, fertilizers, sprays, dairy problems; household and 
farm budgets and accounts. 

Course 2. Modern Elementary Mathematics. (2 Quarters). Offered 

once during the year. 

For students who wish to specialize in junior high school mathe- 
matics and science. The supplementary aspect of the several 
branches of secondary mathematics is recognized and the work is 
presented from a unified point of view. Number, symbol and form-or 
arithmetic, algebra and geometry — frequently enter into the same 
problem and the result is economy of time and richer content. 

Course 3.. Arithmetic for Teachers. (1 Quarter). Offered each 

quarter. 

Review of work to be accomplished in the primary grades and 
brief discussion of methods of the same. The "right sort" of 
arithmetic, formal and applied; eliminations. Means of securing 
good methods of overcoming these difficulties. The State Course of 
Study in arithmetic, the state text and supplementary work discussed. 
(Observation and discussion of typical lessons. 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SCHOOIj MUSIC AND PIANO. 

Mrs. Treadwell, Miss Jones. 
Course 1. Harmony and Ear Training. (2 quarters). Offered each 

semester. 

The Harmony courses develop in students a broader appreciation 
of good music and of the works of the great masters. Ability to 
recognize and execute scales, intervals and simple chords and simple 
chord connections withi their inversions in a given base or a given 
soprano. Ear training, tone thinking, recognition of rhythmic and 
tonal sequences as heard. This course or its equivalent is required 
for beginners, to be followed by Course 2. 

Course 2. Sight Singing. (1 Quarter). Offered 2nd and 4th quarters. 
Rote song used as basis for technical work. Simple rhythmic types^ 
nine common keys, chromatic tones. Individual work emphasized. 

Course 3. Public School Music for Teachers. (1 Quarter). Offered 

every quarter. 

Lectures, discussions and required readings on ways of present- 
ing music in rural primary and upper grades. Study of song and 
technical material used, class demonstrations. 

Course 4. Advanced Sight Singing. (1 Quarter). Offered 1st quarter. 
Fifteen major keys. Bass clef, part-work, modulations. 

64 



m 



I 



Course 5. Appi-cciation. (1 Quarter). Offered 2ncl and 4th quarter. 

Students are afforded opportunities for becoming- familiar with 
standard and classic compositions and to develop a love for good 
music. Victrola and piano player are used. 
Course 6. Teaching and Criticism of Music. (1 Quarter). Offered 

each quarter. 

Seniors will be given practice in the training school each quarter. 
Criticism periods for this course are to be arranged with the Super- 
visor. 
Course 7. Primary Songs, (l Quarter). Offered 2nd and 4th quarters. 

This is a beginners course for Primary specialists. About one- 
third of the quarter is given to note reading. 

General course students may elect course. 
Course 8. Teaching and Criticism of Music. Offered each quarter. 

Seniors will be given practice in the training- school each quarter. 
Crticism periods for this course are to be arranged with the Super- 
visor (Mrs. Treadwell). 
Course 9. Chorus. 

Meets Tuesdaysl and Thursdays at 9:30 thrnout the year. Glee 
Club Wtork and Orchestra will be continued. Each group meets one 
evening a week. 

The Teachers' Course in this department is scheduled each 
quarter. One quarter the work will be directed especially for prim- 
ary teachers, another for elementary and upper grade teachers, and 
the remaining- two quarters for rural teachers. 

PENMANSHIP. 

Mrs. Combs. 
Course 1. General Course. 

Palmer Method Test covered. Drills and exercises as well as 
methods in teaching worked out in class. 
Course 2. Primary Course. 

Methods of Teaching- the Palmer Method to the Primary Grades. 
Special drills and exercises for these grades covered. 
Course 3. Certificate Course. 

Open to senior students or teachers who have had some work in 
the Palmer Method and who wish to obtain the Teacher's Certificate 
in Penmanship. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICATi EDUCATION. 

Miss Watson, Miss Thompson. 
Course 1. Play and Playground Instruction. (1 Quarter). Offered 
twice during the year. 
The theoretical side of this course deals with the psychology of 

55 



play to varying ages and conditions, construction and equipment for 

playgrounds, organization and daily programs, history and literature 

of the playground movement. Part of the time will be devoted to 

the study and practice of playground activities suitable for rural 

schools. 

Course 2. First Aid to Injured. (1 Quarter). Offered twice during 

the year. 

Instruction in emergencies for general use. Treatment of ac- 
cidents, causes and treatment of common ailments and discussion 
of contents of a practical medicine chest. 

Course 3. Educational Hygiene, (l Quarter). Offered every quarter. 
Consideration of effects of all phases of hygiene on the child. 
Principles of sanitation and their relation to conditions under which 
we live. 

Course 4. Corrective Gymnastics. (1 Quarter). Offer#d every 

quarter. 

Course arranged to meet the needs of the student who thru some 
physical or organic weakness i? unable to take the regular practice 
courses in Physical Training. 

Course 5. General Gymnastics. (1 Quarter). Offered every quarter. 
Marching, calisthenics, folk dancing and games. Special atten- 
tion is given to posture. 

Course 6. Advanced Gymnastics. (1 Quarter). Offered twice during 

the year. 

For students who have had general gymnastics. This course will 
Include club swinging, light and heavy apparatus. 

Course 7. Elementary Aesthetic dancing. (1 Quartet). Offered 

every quarter. 

To develop co-ordination, grace and freedom of movement. 
Course 8. Advanced Aesthetic Dancing, (l Quarter). Offered every 

quarter. 

For students who have had elementary dancing. 
Course 9. Practical Gymnastics. (1 Quarter). Offered twice during 

the year. 
Course 9. Practical Gymnastics. (1 Quarter). Ofifered twice during 

the year. 

A course arranged to give the students methods for teaching 
gymnastics, folk dancing and games. Practice teaching will be in- 
cluded. 
Course 10. Sports.. (1 Quarter). Offered every quarter. 

Course In organized team games — as captain ball, volley ball, 
hockey, basket ball, base ball, and so on. 

66 



Course 11. Tennis. Offered 1st and 4th quarters. 
Course 12. Sv^inunlns. (1 Quarter). Offered every quarter. 
Various strokes, diving, stunts, towing and life saving. 

PRIMARY DEPARTMPENT. 

Miss Burks, Miss McDonald, Mrs. Ninneman. 

Course 1. Primary Methods for Specialists. (2 Quarters). Offered 

each semester. 

Required of all students who are talcing the Primary Specialists' 
Course (A-2). Prerequisite, or parallel: Psychology. 

(1) Offered first and third quarters. The aims and principle! 
of primary instruction. Current literature on primary methods read 
and discussed. Relation of subject matter and method. The teach- 
ing process, factors conditioning. Subjects considered: reading, writ- 
ing, drawing, spelling, phonics. A critical study of the modern 
methods of teaching reading. Brief survey of the history of methods. 

(2). Offered second and fourth quarter. Principles applied. 
Selection and organization of subject matter which functions in the 
child's life. Writing of lesson plans. Teaching children how to 
study. Social phases of the recitation. Observation lessons. Subjects 
considered; language, arithmetic, industrial activities. 

Course 2. Primary Methods for General Students.. (1 Quarter). 

Offered twice during the year. 

Aims and principles of primary instruction. Principles applied 
In the selection of subject matter and materials. Rural problems dis- 
cussed. Subjects considered: reading, writing, phonics, spelling, 
arithmetic industrial activities. 
Course 3. I^iterature for Primary Grades. (2 Quarters). Offered 2nd 

and 4 th quarters. 

Educational value of stories for children. Possibilities for crea- 
tive work. Characteristics of a good story. Preparation of a story 
for telling. Story telling. Teaching stories — distinction between tell- 
ing and teaching a story. Method of dramatization. A study of folk 
tales, fairy tales, myths, legends, fables, animal stories, realistio 
stories, and rimes and poetry according to their fitness for various 
ages and purposes. 
Course 4. Teachin;^ in the Primary Grades. (4 Quarters). Senior 

year. 
Course 5. Geography for the Primary Grades. Offered 3rd quarter. 

This course is planned for grades I-IV inclusive. Attention will 
be given to both, subject-matter and method. Selection of material 
of home and world geography adapted to these grades. A study of 
the physical and industrial aspects of home geography. A study of 
type res:ions which best illustrate the geographic control of heat, 

5T 



cold, moisture, drought. Thruout the course, correlations will be 
made with the work in history. 

I>EPART3IENT OF SCIENCE. 

Miss Tyler, Miss McEachran. 
Course 1. Chemistry 1. Beginning- College Clieuiistry. (.2 Quarters). 
The elements of inorganic chemistry with special emphasis upon 
war and useful phases. 

Chemistry 2. Organic Cliemistry. 

The general laws of organic chemistry and the useful organic 
compounds. This runs simiiltaneously with Course 3. 

dourse 2. Chemistry 3. Food Analysis. 
Course 3. Chemistry 4. Physiological Chemistry. 

Chemistry of the body and its functions, with special reference 
to digestion and food requirements. 
Course 4. Chemistry 5. Economic Chemistry. 

Designed for Rural and General students and to provide the 
material requested by the Government for war information. Special 
reference to basis of foods work. 
Course 5. Bacteriology. (2 Quarters). 

Morphalogy and classification of bacteria, study of bacteria found 
in the home. Making of cultures and study of same. Disease, cause 
and immunity. Manipulation of disease organisms. 
Course 6. Economic Bacteriology. 

The bacteriology of common things. Quarter course for Rural 
and General students. 
Course 7. Elementary Science for Grade Teachers. 

Subjects, materials and methods for teaching science In the 
grades. 
Course S. Elementarj- Science for Rural Teachers. 

Subjectjs, materials and methods for teaching science in rural- 
schools. 
ICourse 9. Zoology. (2 Quarters). 

A study of the facts, uses, and general principles connected with 
animals. 

Course 10. Botany. (2 Quarters). 

A study of the factors connected with the physiology and struc- 
ture of seed plants, as a basis for agriculture and war work in foo(^, 
production and the problems, life histories and uses of plants In 
general. 
Course 11, l»hysics. (2 Quarters). 

The facts and principles of physics as related to every day life,, 

58 



Course 12. Physiology, 

A study of the body, special reference to digestion. 
Course 13. Boys and Girls Club Work. Food Preservation. 

A course in different methods of food preservation. 

DElPARXaffENT OF HEALTH. 

(To be selected) 
Course 1. Rural Health Problems. 

Course 2. Home Nursing-. 

Course 3. Schoolroom Health. 



Summary of Attendance Since 1912. 



Session 1912-1913. 



Classified by Year of Course 

First Year (Eliminated) 

Second Year (Eliminated) 

Third Year 235 

Junior Year 90 

Senior Year 50 



Total Regular Session 375 

Summer Session 133 



Classified by Course Pursued 

Course A-1, General 69 

Course A-2, Primary 20 

Course A-3, Home Economics 37 
Course A-4, General 1-Year 13 

Courses B-1-3, Rural 64 

All other Courses 182 

Total in Regular Courses. . .375 
Summer Session 133 



Total Enrollment 508 Total Enrollment 508 

The enrollment of the Training School is not included in the 
above totals. 

The enrollment in the Training Schools in 1912-1913 was 309. 

2. Session 1913-1914. 



Classified by Year of Course 

First Year (Eliminated) 

Second Year (Eliminated) 

Third Year 174 

Junior Year 51 

Senior Year 138 



Total Regular Session 36 3 

Summer Session 186 



Classified by Course Pursued 

Course A-1, General 96 

Course A-2, Primary 41 

Course A-3, Home Economics 27 
Course A-4, General, 1-Year 10 

Courses B-1-3, Rural 65 

All other Courses 114 

Total in Regular Courses. .. 363 
Summer Session 186 



Total Enrollment 549 Total Enrollment 549 

The enrollment of the Training Schools is not included in the 
above totals. 

The enrollment in the Training Schools in 1913-1914 was 170. 



59 



Sessions 191^-1916. 



Classified by Year of Course 

Seniors 74 

Juniors in General Courses. 70 

Juniors in Certificate Courses 83 
Specials — 

In Rural Courses 70 

Piano Students 21 

In Six Weeks Course ... 8 

All others 31 



Total in Ret^ular Session ... 357 
Total (Joint) 

Summer Session 251 



608 



Classified by Course Pursued 

Course A-1, General 44 

Course A-2, Primary 24 

Other Specialists Courses 

(A-6, A-7, A-8) 13 

Course A-4, General (1-year) 16 

Course A-9, Rural "A" 17 

Courses Rural "B" 70 

Other Certificate Courses. . 83 
All other Courses 60 

Total in Regular Session. .. 357 
Total (Joint) 

Summer Session 251 

608 



i 



The enrollment of the Training Schools is not included in the 
above totals. 

The enrollment in the graded Training School in 1914-15 was 
200, I.e.: 

159 Regular Session B. 69 G. 90 

41 Summer Session B. 22 G. 19 

4. Session 1915-1916. 



Classified by Years of Course 

Post Graduates 3 

Seniors 6 2 

Jviniors in Gen. Courses ... 67 

Juniors in Certificate Courses 84 
Specials — 

In Rural Courses 52 

In Piano Courses 14 

In Six Weeks Course .... 2 

In All other Courses 14 

Total in Regular Session ... 298 
Total in (Joint) 

Summer Session 309 

C07 



Classified by Course Pursued 

Course A-1, General 52 

Course A-2 2 5 

Course A-3 20 

Other Specialists' Courses 

(A-6, A-7, A-8) 6 

Course A-4 16 

Course A-9 10 

Courses Rural "B" 52 

Other (Junior) Certificate 

Courses 84 

All other Courses 33 

Total in Regular Session ... 298 
Total in (Joint) 

Summer Session 309 



607 

The enrollment of the Training Schools is not included in the 
above totals. 

The enrollment In the graded training school in 1915-1916, not 
including the summer training school which registered about 62, was 
150. B. 69. G. 81. 

The five rural training centers enrolled approximately 145 child- 
ren during 1915-1916. 



«0 



5. Session 1916-1917 



Classified by Years of Course 

Post Graduates 2 

Seniors 87 

Juniors in General 

Courses 39 

Juniors in Certificate 

Courses 143 

Specials — 

In Rural Courses.... 32 
In Piano Courses.... 22 
In Six Weeks Course. . 4 
In All Other Courses. 10 



Classified by Course Pursued 



General. . . 



59 
3 5 
17 



339 



Course A-1 

Course A-2 

Course A-3 

Other Specialists' Courses 

(A-6, A-7, A-8) 

Course A-4 

Course A-9 

Course A-10 

Course Rural "B" 

Other Junior Certificate 

Courses 143 

All other Courses 36 



Number counted twice. 11 



347 



Number counted twice. 19 



Actual number enrolled 
in Regular Session ... 328 

Actual number enrolled 
in Summer Session.. 263 



Actual number enrolled 

in Regular Session... 328 

Actual number enrolled 

in Summer Session... 263 



Total for the entire year 591 



Total for the entire year 



591 



Eight graduates of the School enrolled for work in the 1917 
Summer School and forty-nine students who attended during the 
regular session remained for the Summer Session. 

The enrollment of the Training Schools is not included in the 
above totals. 

The enrollment in the graded training school in 1916-1917, not 
including* the summer training school which registered 38, was 126. 
B. 63. G. 63. 

The four rural training centers enrolled approximately 115 
children during 1916-1917. 

The local extension work offered during the year in Canning and 
Physical Education registered approximately 57 people. 



61 



6. Session 1917-1918. 



Classified by Tears of Course 

Post Graduates 3 

Seniors 80 

Juniors in General 

Courses 35 

Juniors in Certificate 

Courses 90 

Specials — 

In Rural Courses.... 10 

In Piano Courses.... 19 

In Six Weeks Course 2 

All other Courses 3 

Actual number enrolled 

in Regular Session. . . 242 

Actual number enrolled 

in Summer Session. . . 265 



Total for the entire year 



507 



Classified by Course Pursued 



Course 
Course 



A-1, 

A- 2 



General . 



35 
33 



Course A-3 13 

Course A-4 17 

Course A-9 14 

Course A-10 1 

Course A-8 (Special) . . 1 

Course A-7 (Special) . . 1 

Courses "B" 10 

Piano Specials 19 

Special Courses 3 

Post Graduate Courses. 3 
Junior Certificate 

Courses 92 



Actual number enrolled 

in Regular Session... 2 42 

Actual number enrolled 

in Summer Session. . . 26 5 



Total for the entire year 



507 



The enrollment of the Training Schools is not included in the 
above totals. The enrollment in the graded training school in 1917- 
1918, not Including the summer training school which registered 57, 
was 126, boys 60, girls 66. The six rural training centers' enrolled 
approximately 162 children during 1917-1918, 



62 



DIRECTORY OF STUDENTS 



Lewiston State Normal School 
1917-1918 

Abshire. Frances . A-9-2 Meadows, Idaho 

Aiken, Letha May A-9-1 Orofino, Idaho 

Aldridge, Marie Louise A-9-2 Bonners Ferry, Idaho 



Andersen, Christina A-9-1 . 

Anderson, Allie A-9-2 , 

Anderson, Clara Irene A-1 Sr. 



Coeur d'Alene, Idaho 

Ashton, Idaho 

. . . .Sandpoint, Idaho 



Anderson, Esther A-3 Jr Idaho Falls, Idaho 

Anderson, Ethel A-2 Jr Clarkston, Wash. 

Anderson, Ruby Elizabeth A-2 Sr Idaho Falls, Idaho 

Arth, Elizabeth A-9-1 Eraser, Idaho 

Askey, Edna A-1 JHS Sr Caldwell, Idaho 

Baker, Pauline A-4-1 Caldwell, Idaho 

Baldridge, Lela Gail A-9-2 Parma, Idaho 

Barrett, Glenna M A-9-1 (6 wks.) Joseph, Idaho 

Batterton, Francise B A-9-1 Kellogg, Idaho 

Bell, Myrtle Nellie A-1 Sr Payette, Idaho 

Bevis, Gordon Sp. Piano Lewiston, Idaho 

Blomstrom, Elsie M A-9-1 Cambridge, Idaho 

Bollinger, Mary Edith A-9-1 Fruitland, Idaho 

Booher, Mary V A-1 Sr Troy, Idaho 

Boyd, Edith A-4-9-1 Roseburg, Oregon 

Bozarth, Alice Sp. Piano Lewiston, Idaho 

Bozarth, Hannah Sp. Piano Lewiston, Idaho 

Branson, Evelyn A-4-9-2 Sandpoint, Idaho 

Broker, Mabel Cora A-9 Jr Ilo, Idaho 

Brown, Ethel A-3 Jr Clarkston, Wash. 

Buckingham, Marybelle A-9-1 Gifford, Idaho 

Bumgarner, Marguerite R A-9-2 Nampa, Idaho 



Buntroch, Lena Post Graduate 



Caldwell, Idaho 



Burnside, Mary Frances A-2 Sr. Lewiston, Idaho 

Burnside, Margaret Sp. Piano Lewiston, Idaho 

Bursell, Margaret A-2 Sr Lewiston, Idaho 

Busby, Marjorie A-9-2 Coeur d'Alene, Idaho 

Bush, Marguerite Orril A-4-2 Boise, Idaho 

Campbell, Clara A-9-1 New Meadows, Idaho 

Campbell, Stella A-9 Jr New Meadows, Idaho 

Carscallen, Mabel A-1 JHS Sr Coeur d'Alene, Idaho 

Case, Leota A-2 Sr Clarks Fork, Idaho 

Chaney, Frankie Belle A-9-1 Gifford, Idaho 

Chariton, Lila A-9-1 Coeur d'Alene, Idaho 

Chesley, Charlotte A-2 Sr Burke, Idaho 

Chesley, Frances A-2 Sr Burke, Idaho 

Clark, Frances E A-2 Sr Boise, Idaho 

Clark, Zella A-2 Sr Boise, Idaho 

Cochrell, Mrs. Nora A-9-1 Weippe, Idaho 

Clemans, Irene V Sp. Piano Clarkston, Wash. 

Cody, Ruth Eileen A-9-1 Clarkston, Wash. 

Coldren, Ellen Sp. Piano Clarkston, Wash. 



63 



Conway, Helen A-9-1 Winchester, Idaho 

Cool, Iva M. (Mrs.) A-1 Sr Lewiston, Idaho 

Coolidge, Lois A-9-2 Ilo, Idaho 

Crawford, Hazel A-9-2 St. Maries, Idaho 

Crawford, Marion A-2 Sr Payette, Idaho 

Cronk, Myron P A-1 JHS Sr Worley, Idaho 

Cupp, Margaret A-2 Sr Boise, Idaho 

Curry, Fern A-9-1 Clarkston, Wash. 

Curtis, Iris A-4-1 Caldwell, Idaho 

Davis, Miriam A-9-1 Ilo, Idaho 

Day, Margaret E A-1 JHS Sr Clarkston, Wash. 

Drager, Alathea A-9-1 Bellevue, Idaho 

Dresser, Angeline Jessie A-S Sr Lewiston, Idaho 

Ebinger, Dorothy Eloise A-1 Jr Lewiston Orchards 

Eby, Pearl Naomi A-9-1 Fruitland, Idaho 

Ehlert, Dorothea ........... !B-1 Sweetwater, Idaho 

Engelbrecht, Esther A-9-1 Coeur d'Alene, Idaho 

Enoch, Mamie A-9 Sr Lewiston, Idaho 

Fell, Clarice [ .*A-9-l Culdesac, Idaho 

Foster, Nell A-9-1 Clarkston, Wash. 

Fox, Bertha E A-9 Jr Winchester, Idaho 

Fredrickson, Anna Mae A-1-3 Jr Coeur d'Alene, Idaho 

Gaffney, Clyde A-9 Jr Weippe, Idaho 

Gaffney, Fay S A-9-1 Weippe, Idaho 

Gaffney, Margaret Ella A-9-1 Weippe, Idaho 

Genoway, Ivy p A-9-2 Payette, Idaho 

Genoway, Phoebe May A-9-1 Payette, Idaho 

Givens, Luella A-9-1 Nampa, Idaho 

Goldman, Queen Sp. Piano Clarkston, Wash. 

Gray, Carrie M. (Mrs.) 'Special Ed'n Lewiston, Idaho 

Green, Edra Thelma A-1 Sr Lewiston, Idaho 

Greene, Ethel Alice A-9-1 Culdesac, Idaho 

Greene,, Helen Phoebe. ...... !a-2 Jr Lewiston, Idaho 

Greene, Mary Dering A-3 Sr Salmon, Idaho 

Groefsema, Gertrude A-2 Jr Mountain Home, Idaho 

Groom, Stella Fae A-9-1 Peck, Idaho 

Grosso, Rose A A-2 Sr Nampa, Idaho, R.R. 2. 

Hall, Alma M . . . !a-1 JHS Sr Boise, Idaho 

Hall, Faye A-2 Jr Jerome, Idaho 

Hampton, Minnie Sp. Piano Genesee, Idaho 

Hanratty, Winifred A-9-2 Coeur d'Alene, Idaho 

Harbke, Lenorah E A-4-9-1 Nezperce, Idaho 

Harbke, Olive A-9-1 Nezperce, Idaho 

Plardy, Ellen A-9-1 Cambridge, Idaho 

Harrington, Irene C Post Graduate Caldwell, Idaho 

Hauser, Frances Mamie A-1 Jr Lewiston, Idaho 

Heinzman, Ella A-1 JHS Sr St. Maries, Idaho 

Henderson, Grace M '. !a-1 Sr Nezperce, Idaho 

Hershberger, Emily Mae A-1 JUS Sr Lewiston, Idaho 

Hill, Emma Sp. Piano Lewiston, Idaho 

Hill, Mrs. R. C A-1 Jr Lewiston, Idaho 

Hogaboam, Margaret Ann B-1 Clarkston, Wash. 

Hollingsv/orth, Bertha G Post Graduate Lewiston, Idaho 

Hollingsworth, Lila M A-1 Sr Lewiston, Idaho 

Hollman, Beulah T li-l Lewiston, Idaho 

Holtz, Verla A-9-1 Winchester, Idah;» 

Hoskins, Amelia A-9-1 Myrtle, Idaho 

Hughes, Margaret A-9-1 Spirit Lake, Id.-'.ho 

Irwin, Hazel Dell A-9-1 Juliaetta, Idaho 

Isbell, Pearl Alodia A-1 Sr Lewiston, Idaho 

Jacobs, Louise Clara A-9 Sr Lewiston, Idaho 

64 



Jacobson, Esther H A-9-1 Parma, Idaho 

Jensen, Eleanor Lillian A-4-9 JHS IIo, Idaho 

Johnson. Ethel (Mrs.) 3d Co, Cer. (6 wks.) Cottonwood, Ida. 

Johnson, Hazel B-1 Waha, Idaho 

Johnston, Mabel L A-9-1 Moscow, Idaho 

Jones, Helen M B-1 Bovill, Idaho 

Jones, Rebecca A-2 Sr Gooding, Idaho 

Jordan, Oscar Rush A-10 Sr Lewiston, Idaho 

Judd, Ivy May A-9-1 Kooskia, Idaho 

Kauffman, Ruby Ellen A-9-1 Payette, Idaho 

Keeler, Mabel A-1 Sr Payette, Idaho 

Kellbergr, Hilma Josephine A-9-1 Troy, Idaho 

Kelly, Susie E A-2 Jr Winchester, Idaho 

Kerrick, Doris , .A-4-2 Parma, Idaho 

Kicker, Cora Naomi A-9-1 Milton, Oregon 

Kicker, Minnie Myrtle A-9-1 Milton, Oregon 

Kinney, Whilldin A-4-2 Blackfoot, Idaho 

Knight, Spencer Sp. Piano Lewiston, Idaho 

LaFollette, Georgia A-9-1 Spokane, Wash. 

Latham, Fred L A-9-1 Kansas City, Mo. 

Lanningham, Mae A-9-1 Grangeville, Idaho 

Larkin, Grace E A-9-1 Orofino, Idaho 

Larkin, Maybelle B-1 Oroflno, Idaho 

Larrabee, Mary Ilah A-4-3 Sr Genesee, Idaho 

Lavin, Leila M A-1 JHS Sr Lewiston, Idaho 

Lee, Clara Margaret A-1 JHS Sr Lewiston, Idaho 

Leeper, Louise Margaret A-3 S'r Lewiston, Idaho 

Leeper, Villa M A-2 Jr Peck, Idaho 

Lehfeldt, Edla A-9 Jr Asotin, Wash. 

Lewis, Ethel M A-1-7 Sr Lewiston, Idaho 

Longeteig, Hazel A-9 Jr Southwick, Idaho 

Loy, Maude E A-9 Sr Lewiston, Idaho 

Lozier, Ruth C A-9-1 Tacoma, Wash., 

1224 N. Prospect Ave. 

MacDorman, Frances A-1 Jr Kamiah, Idaho 

Mammen, Bessie A-1 Sr Parma, Idaho 

Mammen, Bonnie A-9-1 Parma, Idaho 

Mason, Maude A-2 Sr Plymouth, Idaho 

Masters, Aaron A-1 JHS Sr Harrison, Idaho 

Mathews, Adda A-3 Sr. Lewiston, Idaho 

McGee, Thelma Sp. Piano Lewiston, Idaho 

McGuire, Mabel A A-4-1 Caldwell, Idaho 

McHugh, Norrine A-3 S'r Spokane, Wash., 

327 E. Boone Ave. 

McKinnon, Precious Pearl A-2 Sr Lewiston, Idaho 

McLeod, Marion A-9-2 Kamiah, Idaho 

McPeak, Betty Jane A-2 Jr Clarkston, Wash. 

McSparran, Gertrude E A-1 Sr Meridian, Idaho 

Melendy, Carolyn Mae A-9-2 Burley, Idaho 

Melendy, Helen B A-2 Sr Burley, Idaho 

Merwin, Marjory A-4-2 Elk River, Idaho 

Michaelson, Grace Sp. Piano Lewiston, Idaho 

Michaelson, Hazel Sp. Piano Lewiston, Idaho 

Michaelson, Mildred Sp. Piano Lewiston, Idaho 

Miller, Margaret A-3 Sr Spokane, Wash. 

Moe. Jessie Katherine A-2 Sr Kellogg, Idaho 

Monroe, Laura A-9-1 Orofino, Idaho 

Morrison, Nanna Marie A-4-1 

Muffle, Meda Sp. Piano Lewiston, Idaho 

Murray, Mildred A-9-1 Sandpoint, Idaho 

Musser, Gail Frances A-2 Sr Filer, Idaho 

66 



Niemann, Winifred A-9-1 Salmon, Idaho 

Nitardy, Elma M A-1 JHS Sr Minneapolis, Minn. 

Noble, Vallie A-1 Sr Orofino, Idaho 

Nunnallee, Cora Helyn A-9-2 Cambridge, Idaho 

Nyquist, Leone A-9-1 Cambridge, Idaho 

O'Brien, Kathleen A-9-1 Coeur d'Alene, Idaho 

Odle, Aletha A-2 Sr Clarkston, Wash. 

Oliver, Agnes E Sp. Piano Clarkston, Wash. 

Oliver, May R A-3 Grangeville, Idaho 

Parker, Sylvia A A-3 Sr Grangeville, Idaho 

Patch, Delia J A-9 Jr Weiser, Idaho 

Passoneau, Joseph Special Lewiston, Idaho 

Pentland, Mary Ellen Ann A-4-1 Granite, Idaho 

Peters, Jennie B Special Joseph, Idaho 

Pittinger, Corinne B-1 Melba, Idaho, R. D. 1 

Plato, Winifred B A-3 Jr Bonners Ferry, Idaho 

Poole, Maude A-1 Sr Lewiston, Idaho 

Randall, Edris Elizabeth A-1 Sr Lewiston, Idaho 

Rathborne, Altha (Mrs.) A-9-2 Cavendish, Idaho 

Raymond, Iva A-8 Jr Caldwell, Idaho 

Reid, Hazel Edna A-4 1 and 3 Caldwell, Idaho 

Reinhardt, Mary A-9-1 Wallace, Idaho 

Richey, Ethel A-4 Nampa, Idaho 

Roberson, Bertha A-9-1 Orofino, Idaho 

Roberts, Everta A-9-2 Oregon City, Oregon 

Rojan, Gladys B-1 Hope, Idaho 

Rood, Katherine B-1 Kooskia, Idaho 

Rose, Edna Maud A-1 Sr Parma, Idaho 

Rouse, Myrtle S A-9-2 Troy, Idaho 

Rugg, Mary Belle A-9-2 Peck, Idaho 

Rowe, Iris May A-9-1 Moscow, Idaho 

Sanderson, Lucia A-2 Jr New Plymouth, Idaho 

Sartain, James Arville A-1 JHS Jr Lewiston, Idaho 

Schilling, Alma Marie A-9 Jr Post Falls, Idaho 

Schmidt, Emma E A-2 Sr Plummer, Idaho 

Schooler, Ida A-9-2 Genesee, Idaho 

Schroeder, Meta Trula A-9-1 Cottonwood, Idaho 

Schultz, Florence M A-9-1 Salmon, Idaho 

Schulze, Jennie L A-1 Jr Lewiston, Idaho 

Shaunessy, Margaret A-9-2 Winchester, Idaho 

Shurtz, Malinda, Irene A-4-1 Boise, Idaho 

Skinner, Georgia A-1 Jr Portland, Oregon 

Small, Laura C A-9-1 Orofino, Idaho 

Smith, Dora Andrea A-9-1 Moscow, Idaho, R.F.D. 1 

Smith, Neeta A-2 Sr Caldwell, Idaho 

Smith, Susan Annette .A-9-1 Payette, Idaho 

Sodorff, Wilda Sophia A-9-1 Johnson, Wash. 

Soule, Ella H A-2 Sr Salmon, Idaho 

Southwick, Chrlstena A-9-1 Southwick, Idaho 

Southwick, Viola .A-9-1 Southwick, Idaho 

Stewart, Lillian A-2 Jr Clarkston, V/ash. 

Stookey, Annice A-2 Jr Lev/iston, Idaho 

Storholt, Mabel A-9-1 Orofino, Idaho 

Swedland, Vivian A-9-1 Potlatch, Idaho 

Sweeney, Johanna A-9-1 Genesee, Idaho 

•Swisher, Mena M A-1 JHS Sr Lewiston, Idaho 

Tabor, Marie Sp. Piano Lewiston, Idaho 

Taylor, Roeby Sp. Piano Lewiston, Idaho 

Teachnor, Myrtle Sp. Piano Lewiston, Idaho 

Tesch, Evelyn Helen A-9-1 Moscow, Idaho 

ToWn, Alice C A-1 Sr Clarkston, Wash. 

0< 



Tuft, Mildred A-9 Jr 

Turner, Marceline A-2 Jr Tacoma, V7ash. 

Vesser, Jean A-9 Sr Rathdrum, Idaho 

Wallace, Ruth A-2 Sr Waha, Idaho 

Wallace, Virla A-9-1 Nezperce, Idaho 

Weaver, John A-9 Jr Lenore, Idaho 

Williams, Bessie B A-9-1 Cottonwood, Idaho 

Williams, Frances Special Lewiston, Idaho 

Willoughby, Alice Beryl A-3 Jr Lewiston, Idaho 

Wilson, Tillis Marie A-9-1 Kamiah, Idaho 

Winegardner, Edith May A-9-1 Lewiston, Idaho 

Wiswell, Mildred A-9-1 Deary, Idaho 

Yarborough, Nora A-9-1 Moscow, Idaho 



Directory of Students of the Summer Session. 



Aiken, Letha May Orofino 

Anderson, Vio Clagstone 

Anderson, Hildur.Coeur d'Alene 

Adair, lona S Moscow 

Aldridge, Marie Louise 

Bonners Ferry 

Anderson, Freeda 

Coeur d'Alene 

Bunyoe, Mrs. M. Leona. . .Viola 
Brandt, Corinne Regina 

Coeur d'Alene 

Bumgarner, Marguerite. .Nampa 
Branson, Evelyn . . . .Sandpoint 
Bean, Beatrice I 

Walla Walla, Wash. 

Baker, W. Roy.. New Plymouth 
Barrett, Glenna Merle. .Canfleld 

Bos, Nellie Granite 

Bandy, Mayme L Peck 

Byrne, Cora Bayview 

Brewster, Pauline ....Lewiston 
Buchanan, Olive ....Woodland 
Brown, Gertrude . . . .Lewiston 

Blake, Ruth Orofino 

Brady, Rose Russell 

Boehl, Cora A Lewiston 

Bailey, Clara L Kendrick 

Bauman, Helen Kingston 

Biddle, Lettie Meridian 

Barackman, Nell Moscow 

Bauman, Thelma ....Kingston 
Berreman, Dora 

Philomath, Ore. 

Brown, Mary E Troy 

Barkley, Gertrude 

Cloverland, Wash. 

Bower, Ada Rose Avon 

Booher, Jeanette 

Clarkston, Wash. 

Brady, Mary A Elk City 

Bigley, Irene A St. Maries 

Cronk, Myron P Worley 

Cupp, Margaret Boise 



Crowell, Gertrude . . .Sandpoint 
ChaflSns, Dorothy ...Sandpoint 
Cave, Mrs. Inez. .Bonners Ferry 

Chaney, lone Gifford 

Craig, Laura. .Clarkston, Wash. 

Compton, Edith Kendrick 

Cronk, Lillian Charlotte 

Worley 

Clark, Frances E Boise 

Clark, Zella Boise 

Chermak, Rose Gifford 

Cook, Nina Grace Emmett 

Comer, Frances 

Deer Park, Wash. 

Dole, Mildred Lewiston 

Donart, Anna A.. Coeur d'Alene 

Dayton, Dorothy Naples 

Dake, Alta M . . . • Cheney, Wash. 
Dinnis, Mary Irene 

Coeur d'Alene 

Dunlap, Beatrice. Coeur d'Alene 
W^right, Mary A. . Bonners Ferry 
Darrah, William Ray. . .Gifford 
DeSaussure, Dorothy 

Coeur d'Alene 

Dawson, Grace Florence 

Agatha 

Dabner, Helen .... Grangeville 
Dresser, Ruth Jane . . . Lewiston 

Delaney, Margaret Orofino 

Dyer, Goldie Coeur d'Alene 

Driessen, Gertrude Ellen.... 

Harrison 

Emerson, Vivian Louise 

Bannack, Mont. 

Elliott, Frances A Weiser 

Engle, Leona Henrietta 

Kooskia 

Ehlert, Dorothea. .. .Sweetwater 

Eam.aii, Lucy Sandpoint 

Engle, Cleo M Kooskia 

Enoch, Mamie A Lewiston 

Fry, Amy Genevieve 



«7 



* Bonners E^erry 

Foster, Nell Cecil 

Clarkston, V/ash. 

Foredyce, Ollieve W 

Cloverland, Wash. 

Fietzer, Eimma Jo 

Big Falls, Wis. 

Fell, Clarice Culdesac 

Ferguson, Mrs. William 

Deary 

Fitzsimmons, Thelma . . . .Mica 

Fredrickson, Anna 

Coeur d'Alene 

Fann, Mary Louise.. . .Lewiston 

Grosso, A. Rose Nampa 

Gray, Emma T Lewiston 

Graebener, Gertrude . . . Giff ord 

Guy, Jo W Kendrick 

Giesler, Mrs. Dora. . . .Potlatch 
Gossett, Verda Mae .... Moscow 
Gallaher, Effie Lucile . 

Harrisburg 

Greene, Ethel Alice. . .Culdesac 
Greene, Helen Phoebe 

Lewiston 

Genoway, May Payette 

Gibbs, Frances Ruth 

Cambridge 

Hardy, Ellen Cambridge 

Heinzman, Eilla St. Maries 

Harvey, Angileta . . . Harrisburg 

Hafterson, Annie Lane 

Holmstrom, Emily Weiser 

Hobson, Winnif red Gifford 

Hanson, Manila May. .Kendrick 

Hill, Jennie Moscow 

Hanners, M. Jeannette 

Coeur d'Alene 

Harbke, Lillian M . . . . Nezperce 
Hollmon, Beulah Truesdell. . 

Lewiston 

Hart, Mildred E Lewiston 

Hilts, Douglas Mackay 

Hanratty, Mary Rita 

Coeur d'Alene 

Halgren, Olga, Devils Lake, N. D. 
Hoban, Alice M., Spokane, Win. 
Inghram, Opal Viola. . Lewiston 
Inghraham, Evelyn... Kooskia 

Irwin, Hazel Juliaetta 

Johnson Violet Marie 

Coeur d'Alene 

iJohanson, Tennle .... Oroflno 

Johnson, Esther E Troy 

(Johnson, Frances . . Nezperce 
CTohnson, Margaret... Lewiston 
Jones. Vera E. .Bonners Ferry 

Johnson, Hazel W|aha 

Keely. Alicia Sandpoint 

Kuhn. Mllllcent .... Lewiston 
Klaus, Maybelle . . . Sandpoint 



Knorr, Christine E., Grangeville 
Kruse, Besse M., Coeur d'Alene 

Kenney, Vera M Peck 

Killner, Esther. . Coeur d'Alene 

Kerrick, Doris Parma 

Lavell, Mildred .. .Spokane, Wn. 
Leitch, Thelma Marie, Lewiston 
Lommasson, Helen 

Clarkston, Wlash. 

Lyon, Mrs. Lois Mky Harrisburg 

Litch, Eva Moscow 

Logue, Willa Gooding 

Laymaster, Zella Wieiser 

Leeper, Dorothy Alice, Lewiston 
Lockridge, Mabel 

Clarkston, Wash. 

Latimer, Sylvia Lane 

Lanningham Laura C 

Grangeville 

Larkin, Maybelle .... Orofino 
Larkin, Grace Ethel. . .Orofino 
Lee, Clara Margaret. Lewiston 

Lytle, Lucetta G Stites 

Luce, Helen Jeanette 

Albany Falls 

Misner, Helen Dorothy, Melrose 

Monroe, Laura Orofino 

Merwin, lEivelyn S Oirofino/ 

Melendy, Helen B Burley 

Moe, Jessie Katherine, Kellogg 
McDuffie, Lucile H.. Sandpoint 

Messinger, Lena Gifford 

McAllister, Viola M. . . Crescent 

Munson, Vivian Mibscow 

Morgan, Dorothy A 

Coeur d'Alene 

McKern, Vida Mae . . Juliaetta 

McKern, Hazel Juliaetta 

Maynard, Patricia L 

Johnson, Wlash. 

Marsh, Florence A 

Endicott, Wlash. 

Misner, Mildred Melrose 

McClannahan, Jessie M 

Coeur d'Alene 

Morse, Irma, Walla Walla, Wn. 
McGregor, Isabel . . Kendrick, 
McGuire, Golda, 

Kalisijell, Mont. 

McGrath, Gladys ....Lewiston 

McGhee, Jessie L Leland 

Miller, Margaret, Spokane, Wii. 

McLeod, Myrtle Kamiah 

McConnaughen, Ruth 

. Coeur d'Alene 

Masters, Aaron A. A., Harrison 

Marshall, Hazel E., Gibbs 

Moon, Gladys Kamiah 

Martin, Ada Marie 



Coeur d'Alene 

Morton, Margaret . . . Moscow 

Miller, Madge Nezperce 

McKeever, Mabel Genevieve . . 

Kendrick 

Niemann, Winifred D... Carmen 
Nolan, Ray ...Garfield, Wlash. 
Nylander, Elvina V 

Coeur d'Alene 

Nylander, Ruth, Coeur d'Alene 
Nylander, Esther A 

; Coeur d'Alene 

Nettleingham, Mabel . .Colburn 

Noble, Vallie Orofino\ 

O'Brien, Kathleen 

Coeur d'Alene 

O'Keefe, Norene, Coeur d'Alene 

O'Hara, Alma Orofino 

Oliver, Reeta, Clarkston, Wash. 
Plato, Winifred B 

Bonners Ferry 

Pierstorff, Nola Izetta, 

Lewiston 

Pring, Olive Blossom, Lewiston 
Page, Celia K., .Coeur d'Alene 

Parkins, Greeta Lapwai 

Peterson. Segne, Clarkston Wn. 
Parkes, Mrs. Cleora C 

Portland, Or. 

Poole, Maude Lewiston 

Pentland, Mary Ellen, Granite 

Rogers, Beatrice E Stites 

Rogers, Ida May Stites 

Rojan, Gladys Hope 

Reader, Lena Harrison 

Routson, Adelia Weiser 

Reynolds, Martha Marie, Weiser 
Ratliff, Nellie B., ... .Nezperce 
Rhett Myrtle K. . . Cottonwood 

Ruch, Frances Kellogg, 

Rodins, Lucia . . Coeur d'Alene 

Reed, Nellla Webb 

Reinhardt, Mary A. . . Wallace 

Rowe, Iris May Moscow 

Scott, Emma Agnes. .Lewiston 
Streit, Elizabeth A., St. Maries 
Swatman, Ruth . . . Ferdinand 

Smith. Ethelyn H Gem 

Swift, Edna E Wallace 

Snyder, Grace J Lewiston 

Smith, Leah Linden 

Sloan, Maude C. . . Grangeville 
Schurtz Florence M. . . Salmon 
Schroeder, Meta Trula 

Cottonwood 



iSebelist, Ruth Loise, Sandpoint 
Sheridan, Avice Clare . . Boise 
Stoddard, Rosettii .... Gifford 
Schwartz, Ethel Elva . . Lenore 

Simpson, Grace Orofino 

Smithwick, Mary A. . . Moscow 

Stoufer, Isabel Nezperce 

Schafer, Lily Nezperce 

Slayton, Mary R Harrison 

Sweeney, Johanna M. .Genesee 
Stoddard, Nina .... Rathdrum 
Stoddard, Edna Georgia 

. . Rathdrum 

Sellers Beulah Lee Lane 

Schultz, Dora MUdred, Salmon 
Shanafelt, Edna Lyall, Salmon 
Schilling, Alma . . Spokane, W'n. 
Stantial, Flora, Spokane, Wash. 

Tefft, Ruth Agusta Ho 

Thain, Mary Florence, Melrose 
Thain, Douglas W. . . . Melrose 
Tuttle, Dorothy E., Cambridge 
Tallman, Edith Alta Lewiston 
Terry, Margaret .... Kendrick 
Terhaar, Carolyn M., 

I. . . Cottonwood 

'Tard5% Maybell E Lapwai 

Tuttle, Hazel M. . . . Cambridge 
Thorne, Margaret 

Coeur d'Alene 

Turner, Mary E Kooskia 

Tardy, Alice Mina .... l^^pwai 
Welch, Edith Elvira 

Bonners Ferry 

William. Ethel V., St. Maries 
Wilson, Golda A. ... Lewiston 
Webster, Edith L. . Garfield, Wn 

Wright, Elda St. Maries 

Warren, Harry Homer. , Peck 

Warner, Annabel Weiser 

Wickstrom, Cecilia 

Liberty Lake, Wash. 

Wilcox, Gladys . Payette 

Wendt, Emilie A. . . . C'uldesac 
White, Mattie Ellen, Cambridge 

Wilson, Ina T Lewiston 

Willis, Lucile Elnore. . .Lenore 

Willis, Clarissa Lenore 

Walser Verna M Worley 

Wethered, Clara, Spokane, Wn. 
White, Alice Irene. , , . Wlallace 
White, Jennie H. . . Eidgemerc 
Williams. Vivian . . Sandpoint 
York, Ethel Greencreek 



et 



Publications of Lewiston State Normal School. 



BULLETINS. 



Vol. 


1, 


No.l. 


Vol. 


1, 


No. 


2. 


Vol. 


1, 


No. 


3 


Vol. 


1, 


No. 


4. 


Vol. 


2, 


No. 


1. 


Vol. 


2, 


No. 


2. 


Vol. 


2, 


No. 


3. 


Vol. 


3, 


No. 


1. 


Vol. 


3, 


No. 


2. 


Vol. 


3, 


No. 


3. 


Vol. 


3, 


No. 


4. 


Vol. 


4, 


No. 


1. 


Vol. 


4, 


No. 


2. 


Vol. 


4, 


No. 


3. 


Vol. 


4, 


No. 


4. 


Vol. 


5, 


No. 


1. 


Vol. 


5, 


No. 


2. 


Vol. 


5, 


No. 


3. 



Catalog, 1896-1897. (Out of print.) 
Circular of Information, 1903-1904. (Out of print.) 
Biennial Report, 1902-1904. (Out of print.) 
Catalog, 1904-1905. (Out of print.) 
Catalog, 1905-1906. (Out of print.) 
Bulletin, 1905. (Out of print.) 
Bulletin, January to March, 1916 (Out of print.) 
Manual Training, Nature Study, and Announcements. 

August, 1907. (Out of print.) 
Biennial Report. 1904-1906. 

History in the Grades. March, 1907. (Out of print.) 
Catalog. June, 1907. 

Legislative Enactments, 1893-1907. November, 1907. 
Civics in the Grades. March, 1908. (Out of print.) 
Supplementary Catalog Number. June, 1908. 
Biennial Report, 1906-1908. December, 1908. 
Catalog. 1909. 

Bulletin. April, 1910. (Out of print.) 
Some Library Aids for Teachers. September, 1910. 

COut of print.) 
Biennial Report. 1908-1910. 

School Libraries, February, 1911. (Out of print.) 
General Information. April, 1911. (Out of print.) 
The Preparation of Teachers for Elementary Schools. 
(Out of print.) 
Vol. 5, No. 4. Courses for the Preparation of Teachers in Subjects 
Other Than Those Purely Professional in Charac- 
ter. (Out of print.) 
School Libraries. (Revised). April, 1912. (Out of 

print.) 
Rural School Book List. April, 1912. (Out of print.) 
Announcement of Department of Home Economics. 

June, 1912. 
List of Books for Public Schools. (Out of print.) See 

State Board Bulletins, Vol. 3, No. 3. 
General Catalog. June, 1913. (Out of print.) 
Announcement of Rural Department. August, 1913. 
(Out of print.) 
Vol. 8, No. 1. Seat Work for Rural Schools. November, 1913. (O^ut 

of print) See Vol 11, No. 1. 
Vol. 8, No. 2. Social Activities for Rural Schools. February, 1914. 

(Out of print.) 
Vol. 8, No. 3. Biennial Report. 1913-1914. (Out of print.) 
Vol. 8, No. 4. Oral English. February, 1915. (Out of print.) 
Vol. 9, No. 1. General Catalog. July, 1915. (Out of print.) 
Vol. 9. No. 2. May Festival. Mlarch, 1916. (Out of print.) " Se» 

Vol. 10, NO. 2. 
Vol. 9, No. 3. Course of Study for the Training School. May, 1916. 

(Out of print). 
Vol. 9, No. 4. General Catalog. August, 1916. (Out of print). 
Vol. 10, No. 1. Biennial Report. 1915-1916. 

Vol. 10, No. 2. May Festival. Revised Reprint of Vol. 9, No. 2. (Out 
of print). 

70 



Vol. 


6, 


No. 


Vol. 


6, 


No. 


Vol. 


6, 


No. 


Vol. 


7. 


No. 


Vol. 


7, 


No. 


Vol. 


7, 


No. 



Vol. 10, No. 3. Announcement of the 1917 Summer Session. May, 1917. 

Vol. 10, No. 4. General Catalog-. August, 1917. 

Vol. 11, No. 1. Occupational Seat Work for Rural Schools. Revised 

edition of Vol. 8, No. 1. (Out of print.) 
Vol. 11, No. L'. Announcement of the 1918 Summer Session, May, 1918. 
Vol. 11, No. 3. General Catalog. August, 1918. 

Owing to the recent fire in the Administration Building all of 
these bulletins are out of print, but it is planned that many of them 
shall be reprinted in the fall. Information can be obtained concern- 
ing them by addresjiing the I'resident's Office. 



Idaho Rural Teacher's Monitor — Published monthly thruout the regu- 
lar session. 



BUliLETINS ISSUED BY THE STATE BOARD OF EDIIOATIOIV. 

The State Department of Education has a limited number of these 
Bulletins for distribution. 
Number 1 — Educational Conditions in Idaho. (Brief Summary 
in June, 1914). 

Vol. I No. 4 — Course of Study — 1915 Edition — Includes two sup- 

plements. 25 c. 

Vol. I No. 5 — High School Bulletin No. 1 — Requirements for 

Standard High Schools — Organization of Small 
(High Schools. 

Vol.11 No. 1 — Handbook for Rural Teachers. (Price 25c). 

Vol. II No. 2 — State Educational Institutions — Joint Catalog (1916) 

Vol. II No. 2 — Suggestions for Purchasing School Equipment, Fur- 

niture and Supplies. 

Vol. II No. 3 — High School Bulletin No. 2 — Work in Small Schools. 

Vol. II No. 4 — History of Idaho — Outline for Study of. 

Vol. til No. 4 — Legislative Proposals Concerning Education — for 

1917 Session of Legislature; also, gives the "Idaho 
Plan." 

'Ebctra Edition Health of the Country School Child. 

Vol. Ill No. 1 — Special Report on School Finance. 

Vol. Ill No. 1 — Second Biennial Report — Includes reports of State 
Board of Education, the State Superintendent and 
the six educational institutions for the biennium 
ending December, 1916. 

Vol. Ill No. 2 — School House Plans — ^One-room Buildings. 

Vol. Ill No. 3 — Handbook for Rural School Trustees. 

Extra Edition Report of Sensory and Mental Tests at Industrial 

Training School. 

Extra Edition High School Bulletin No. 3 — ^Textbooks for High 

Schools. 

Vol. Ill No. 3 — List of Books for Elementary and Rural Schools. 

Pamphlet on Examination and Certification of Teachers. 

A Course In Professional Reading. 

School Laws — Effective July 1 1917. 



71 



Application for Admission to the Lewiston State Normal 

School. 

To be sent to the Recorder at least two weeks before the day for enrollment 

^^rne ' Date of Birth 

Home Address . 

CERTIFICATE OF HIGH SCHOOL STANDING. 

THIS CERTIFIES, That 

has attended the High School at 

District No County, Idaho, and that 

the following- is a correct record of subjects taken and standings therein: 



Subjects 


Credits 
earned 


No. 

weeks 


The above named student was ad- 
mitted to this school and duly accred- 








ited with the following subjects from 
















High School: 
















Subjects: 











































































Credits I'eqinred for graduation in this High School: 

The above named student was graduated from this High School on 
191..., and is entitled to admission to the Univer- 
sity of Idaho, the Idaho Technical Institute, the State Normal School at 
Lewiston, the State Normal School at Albion, and to the examination for 
certificate to teach school within the State of Idaho. 



(Signed 



Principal of High School. 



Superintendent of City Schools. 
, Idaho 



Date 

Name of Course chosen 



Date on which you expect to enroll , 191 

73 



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S"/ 


1 




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1 



UNIVERSfTY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 



3 0112 111977960